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96 BURNER HEAD REMOVAL

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by kaw550red, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    96 burner heads are often jammed in place. This is a home made extractor that has shifted all of the burner heads that I have tried it on.

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    TOOLS NEEDED You will need a hacksaw, a tap with appropriate drills, a 14 mm drill for drilling the vaporising tube hole, a centre punch and a hammer. I used 6 mm screws but you could use 1/4" if you had those.

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    COMPONENTS I used 25 mm x 5 mm steel cross plates and 25 mm x 25 mm x 3 mm steel angle which had one flange cut down to 12 mm wide because it the assemblies were very clumsy with 25 mm flanges projecting from the flat assembly. Basically I used these sizes because I already had them. The two assemblies need to be as rigid as possible however there is a limited depth to fit them so you cannot go too mad on the thicknesses or you will not be able to fit the assemblies to the vaporising tube.

    MAKING Cut the cross plates and angles to length. On mine the angles are 95 mm long. Drill through the angles and cross plates to get the tapping holes exactly in the right place. Enlarge the holes in the angles to become clearance holes for the assembly screws. Tap the cross plates and assemble both plate assemblies with your chosen screws. The edges of the angles must be tightly butted against each other. Now centre punch the vaporising tube hole in the middle of each plate assembly. The angles need a splayed cut to allow them to pivot without fully dismantling the tool when fitting it to the vaporising tube. On mine I had a mental aberration and splay cut the ends of all of the angles on the stop plate. You only need one splay cut end to allow the angle to pivot away from the the other angle. The top plate needs splay cut ends on every end to clear the thrust screws threads however only one needs to be wide enough to allow the plate to pivot when fitting it to the vaporising tube. Drill and tap the thrust screw holes.

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    FITTING IN POSITION Remove one screw at one end of the pivoting angle. Slacken the screw at the other end. Pivot the angle to one side. Place the assembly either against the vaporising tube gland nut or against the burner head. Swing the angle back into position. Replace screw and tighten it and the slacken screw to form a rigid assembly Repeat with the other plate assembly at the opposite end of the vaporising tube. Either assembly can go at either end but it is probably simpler if the thrust plate ( with the projecting screws ) goes at the gland nut end as this gives more space for your spanner head.

    THE SPIRIT CUP SHOULD BE BETWEEN THE PLATES SO THAT THE PRESSURE IS EXERTED DIRECTLY ON THE GLAND NUT RATHER THAN THE SPIRIT CUP

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    IN USE Simply take up the slack on the thrust screws and then tighten them in turn so that an even pressure is exerted on the gland nut and burner head. Do not over tighten one and then go to the other as this will create an unequal pressure which could jam the burner head on a lot worse than it is. A half turn on each screw is probably enough to keep the pressure equal. On badly jammed burner plates you may push the gland nut off the tube. This can happen if the tube has been badly soldered in the first place. If this happens resolder it in place and the new joint should be strong enough to allow the burner head to be pushed off .

    Now that you have used the tool the thrust screws will have marked the cross plates where they have been pushing against it. Use these marks to drill recesses for the thrust screws to rest in when they are under load. You will probably find that the thrust screws will only fit with the plate assemblies fitting in one direction. In the other direction they may be fractionally out of position. When you use the finished assemblies make sure that the thrust screws are located in the recesses to avoid them slipping on the plates.

    I often work on 96s so it has been worth my while to make this tool. Obviously if you seldom work on 96s it would not be worth it.

    REMOVING BURNER HEADS WITHOUT THE TOOL You will need a blow lamp and a rod which fits through the slots of the burner head basket. Screw the vaporising tube into the tank. Heat the burner head with the blow lamp avoiding heating the tube. After it has got hot insert the rod through two opposite basket slots, grasp the tank and twist the rod in a clockwise direction making sure to keep the rod as close to the top of the tube as possible. If it slides to the top of the holes there is a danger that the basket will distort. It should come loose relatively easily. If it does not heat the basket a little hotter to make the socket expand more and slacken its grip on the tube.

    GOOD LUCK!

    Regards Bryan
     
  2. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It occurred to me that I had never updated this item. I have sold the majority of my collection together with the above tool

    However I still buy 1/2 pint and 1 pint stoves occasionally so still need to remove jammed burner heads from vapourising tubes.

    1362320056-Tool_opt.jpg

    1362320070-Slots_opt.jpg

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    The tools are sold to push disc brake pistons back into the cylinders so you can replace brake pads.

    You have to cut two slots in the blades to fit around the vapourising tube. The blades are quite hard so this is hard work. Once the slots are cut you insert the vapourising tube into the slots as shown, wind the tommy bar and the burner should pop off.

    The tools only cost about £8.50 plus postage so with a little work you have an effective tool which still works on brake pistons

    Regards Bryan
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  3. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Bryan. I've added your thread to my Favourite Topics for future reference.

    Terry
     
  4. Rick b

    Rick b United States Subscriber

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    Great idea Bryan.
     
  5. JonD

    JonD United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I have been putting this job off for a long time. I have had a 96 of old which has never burned that well and recently I was given another with a jet orifice heading for 0.5mm

    Lacking the tools described in the foregoing I decided to try removal of the bell by the heating method. Here is a picture of the setup. I was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was.

    A pot leg from a Primus 210 was a perfect fit through the slots, the machinists vice acted as heatsink for the lipstick, the torch allows very precise application of the heat to the bottom of the bell. With a slightly carburizing flame, (acetylene rich) heating the bell until the surface oxidation was just reducing back to bare metal, a slight twist and it fell off!

    It took longer to get all the gear out of the shed than it did to do the job. I don't know why I put this off so long. Aren't Bank Holidays wonderful things. :)

    1369647856-96_burner.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  6. Greeley

    Greeley United States Subscriber

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    Finally looked a this post. The tool is very (extremely!) similar to a tool used by brass band instrument repairmen to pull a stuck mouthpiece from a trumpet, tuba, etc. Works on the same principle of reverse pressure.

    I have such a tool to use when my young students get the mouthpiece stuck. I will have to try mine on my 96 tube when I get home! And will post a pic!
     
  7. Greeley

    Greeley United States Subscriber

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    Here are pics of my "Bobcat" mouthpiece puller, designed for removal of brass instrument mouthpieces.

    Puller.a.JPG

    Puller.a.JPG

    Puller.b.JPG

    Front jaws adjustable to fit any instrument from French Horn to tuba. I tried it on my Primus 96 and it fits just fine.

    Available from many music industry suppliers. Perhaps they stole the idea from Bryan!!

    Best regards,

    Tom
     

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