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Coleman 424, manufactured in 2006

Discussion in 'Coleman No:424' started by presscall, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A recent post from Simon (spike589715) threw up problems he'd experienced with this model and by sheer coincidence I'd just bought one from someone local to me who went for 'collection only' on his ebay listing, which kept the price down to £23 and a 4-mile round trip.

    With Simon's problem with a non-return valve and combustion issues still under discussion in that thread I checked out my purchase, chucked the reeking pump petrol away, stripped and cleaned the valve, fuel/air pickup tube and generator, then packed my (Coleman) suitcase, left home and took to the woods, not too far a stroll away from home

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    This 424 dates from May 2006 and has a rather attractive, and more importantly durable, leather-grain dark green paint finish. My Coleman 413G from 1971 is much larger and heavier, with a larger-diameter and longer generator tipped with a larger-bore jet nozzle, so the 413 burns hotter on max

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    I stripped the valve as I said, cleaned the parts in an ultrasonic machine and dried them off with a compressor.

    Lever up, fuel pickup hole partially plugged by the eccentric-controlled inner rod, burner taking pressurised air from above fuel level through hole in outer concentric pickup tube, atomising the trickle of fuel entering the inner pickup tube

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    Lever rotated down one minute into warm-up, control rod in pickup tube raised, allowing full flow of fuel able to be vapourised in a generator up to working temperature

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    The eccentric control and graphite packing

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    I mentioned the reek of pump petrol fuel when I first got the stove. The stove hasn't seen much use in the nine years it's been around, judging by the rather good state of the paintwork and griddle. Consequently, though there was some coke deposit on the cleaning needle control rod in the generator there wasn't much. Cleaned up, the stove will be fuelled by Aspen in future, so should do well on that

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    Simon replaced the non-return valve (check valve) in his stove, but having found my check valve wasn't torqued down at all firmly, I wonder whether that was true of his also? He'd had fuel spurting out of the hole in the pump knob when pressurising the tank - I assume with the fuel tank dismounted from the stove and upright, pump, uppermost, otherwise fuel wouldn't reach the tank-top air inlet to reach the check valve. A check valve only loosely screwed in would have the same effect as a leaky valve.

    I certainly didn't need the removal tool to get the check valve out, but it made sure it went back in properly tightened up

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    There's not a lot holding the burner in place in the stove box, but sufficient

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    Food spills had attacked the burner drip/mounting tray beneath the main burner (used most)

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    I treated the rust with chemical remover and daubed on some paint approximating to the colour - not too obvious a mis-match in that location

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    The spare generator I have isn't for this model, but the instructions for removing the generator are uncompromisingly robust, using a vice and serrated jaw pliers

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    I love the clips holding the windshields in place! Very effective, positive fixings that makes windshields and (open) lid a rigid combination, shrugging off gusts of wind

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    Great control of the flame, not too bad on the secondary burner either, which takes what fuel/air mixture it can get from the mixing chamber some distance away

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    Not a stove to look up to as the most desirable when some of the old classics are in contention perhaps ...

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    ... but certainly not one to look down on either

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    John
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
  2. HercL4D2

    HercL4D2 United States Subscriber

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    Nice!!! I like it.
     
  3. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    Great strip down and explanation as always, John.
    The stove is in great condition, and for £24 it was an amazing bargain.
    Over here the new price is fives times that.
    Beautiful scenery as always.
     
  4. jbf

    jbf Canada Subscriber

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    john :thumbup::clap: great find
    Great pictures
    is this prose or poetic ?
    john
     
  5. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    I've one of each here, and one problem stands out: Coleman used the same gauge sheet metal for both stoves, and what works for the 424 and small suitcase stoves is rather flimsy and lacks rigidity when you scale up the design, as in the 413 series.

    Sad, as pressing in some ribbing to the sheet metal would have stiffened up the metal and made for a better stove overall, IMO.
     
  6. itchy United States

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    Nice presentation, again. Thanks.
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks all!

    I can see how that would be, Murph, good point. I seem to have the best of both worlds with the 413 as a stove for base camp or garden and the much lighter and compact 424 for the occasional excursion as proved possible (one more mile, not). Only detraction for the 413, as I've read and agree (since I have the 3-burner model too) is that if you're using a roomy stove you might as well go all the way and trundle out the 426 instead, with the third burner and even more room to accommodate pots and Coleman oven.

    John
     
  8. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    John, I'd be more inclined to use the 424 for base camp and take the 502 I have here for going afield. I'll be damned if I'll be out, away from camp and trying to put a stove together!

    For an excursion or such, I need a stove that I can fire up in total darkness or blindfolded, moments like that when you get caught short, you need something that works every time, right out of the gate. No bits or tits that just don't fit; strike a spark and damn, it's lit!

    Murph
     
  9. spike589715 United Kingdom

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    Great review and a great bargain !
    Thanks for the NRV thoughts though mine was very well tightened down so I am sure this was not the issue with mine
    I could also blow through it both ways so it really was not working

    Cheers
    Simon
     

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