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Coleman 457G Handy Gas Plant *

Discussion in 'Coleman No:457' started by nzmike, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. nzmike New Zealand

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    Hi Team.

    I picked up this behemoth for the princely sum of NZ$35 at our antique auction a few weeks back, when I looked it over it seemed to be complete apart from the usual rock hard pressure seal on the filler cap.

    1354839523-bigassccs.jpg

    The hammer on the ground is for size scale, not for 'adjusting'. :lol:

    The label calls it a Coleman 457G Handy Gas Plant. Biggest petrol stove I ever did see! :shock:

    A bit cautious of anything that holds that much petrol, I spent some time just pressurizing the tank with compressed air and fiddling with the valves etc. It seemed to hiss from all the right places and the paint applied by the last owner didnt seemed to have found it's way into anything vital, so last nite I poured in a couple of liters of 91 octane, pressurized the tank, held a gas torch to the burner and opened the valves.....

    Like any Coleman, it hissed at me, spluttered a couple of times then lit up neat as you like 8) It was then I discovered the black paint used on the burner most surely WASNT hi-temp stuff, it flared and carried on nicely for a minute or 2 then settled down to an impressive blue foundation with an orangy pyramid of flame about 6-8 " tall. Before anyone states the obvious, I'll try to get a pic of it running tonite, if my old and knackered digicam obliges :roll: I put a 10" X 12" hot plate on it to see what the flame pattern did, flames poured over all sides of the plate :twisted:

    It fair chucks out the heat, much as I thought it would, and I'm planning to use it to heat my outdoor bath in summer when an open fire is neither safe nor smart.

    The pressure gauge goes up to 80psi, so far I have yet to run it past 30 or so, that being as much as my big compressor will comfortable cope with. The gauge has no red line for over pressure, but I would hesitate to go much past 50-60 psi anyhow, call me chicken...

    I ran it for about 15 minutes at 20-odd psi, pressure seemed to fall off slowly and a top up of air back to 35 psi geed it up nicely.

    Question: Do these self pressurise, or do I need to re pressurise it every so often? I would have thought it was self pressurising once running, but my experience with these things is limited to 1. It looks like the burner support pole has been replaced at some point, the only pic I could find of the same stove clearly shows the burner sitting almost on top of the tank.

    The only thing that does concern me just a tad is the O ring I used to replace the hard one is quite a lot thicker than standard. It seals ok, but seems to foul the vent on the cap, when I had it pumped up with just air, I tried to relieve the tank pressure (only 15 psi) by carefully unscrewing the cap, which promptly blew right off with a resounding boom and tossed the cap and valve stem/seat out of my hand and across the workshop. Lesson learned.

    Either way it's an interesting thing, I await with interest to see how it goes heating a cast iron bath. I'm picking it'll cope fine.
    ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. 111T

    111T United States Subscriber

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    I bet that'd deep fry a turkey. (This is of course the highest measure we in america use to describe stoves) What was it originally designed for?
     
  3. nzmike New Zealand

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    The big yellow label says 'Suitable for hospitals, creameries, dairies, workshops and dozens of other uses. Made in Wichita, Kansas.'

    The previous owner was of the opinion that it came from a traveling show, probably as a hot dog or chip deep fryer or some such.
     
  4. Nordicthug United States

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    Not actually a stove. It's a general purpose heat source for whatever use one might have, even space heating with some sort of reflector or heat sink. ( A LARGE terra cotta plant pot upside down over the burner seems a likely candidate.) Coleman appliances as a general rule do not self pressurize and usually need a few pumps from time to time. It will require a bit of attention during use. Myself, I wouldn't turn my back on it while lit for any reason, that sucker's huge. If no compressor's handy, I should think a good old fashioned hand tire pump would fill the bill quite nicely.

    Excellent acquisition.

    Gerry
     
  5. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hey, Mike,

    Now, THAT is way cool!!!! Outside of books, I've never seen anything like that! Very nice find, and seems to work just fine. I would say that such a thing will have to be pumped up, when operating, just like regular Coleman stoves. They all LOVE the pump, and the more the merrier, most of the time!! Thanks for sharing this Big Boy with us! Very neat! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  6. nzmike New Zealand

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    This is it running at about 25 psi.

    |imgRemoved|

    The flames are slightly taller than they look in the pic and moving quite a bit faster. The blue at the base is starting to lift off the burner slots. I await with interest to see what it looks like with a good head of pressure....
     
  7. danta United States

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    dont know if youve seen any others but this fellow has quite a collection...
    and he posts photos...

    http://www.m151a2.jp/gi/457g.html

    i think he has one with an soldering iron heater lid on it....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  8. Lance United States

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    Mike do not pressurize above 25-30 psig.
    That is the max operating pressure for any coleman appliance i've ever used. Oh, you can pump it up more, but not a good idea. Lucky you to have found one that wasn't all rusted.

    lance
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  9. nzmike New Zealand

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    I bow to your broader experience, Lance, thanx for the heads up. Kind of odd the pressure gauge doesnt have 'You no pump up more than this!' line on it.
     
  10. Lance United States

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    the riser tube is really to long acording to mine but if it cooks who cares. If you are going to put any kind of large pot on it extend the burner supports down to the fount. very tipsy otherwise. straight legs and some kind of rubber stopper at the bottom is enough.

    lance
     
  11. Kenh157 United States

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    I have a very knowledgeable theory that says you are all wrong. It is not a chicken coop warmer, lead melter, or heater element at all.
    It is a bed bug trap. They are very common
    in __________( enter country of choice by name )
    It is a source of Carbon Dioxide. The warm
    Carbon Dioxide goes out thru a missing hose into
    an also missing white sock attachment that emits warmed CO2 gas.
    The entire apparatus is placed under the blankets on a bed. The emitted CO2 draws the bedbugs into the warm sock that traps the buggers.
    Then the entire assembly is cleaned and the sock is thrown away with the bedbugs.
    It is quite common for the hose to be thrown out with the sock. Hence the missing sock and hose assembly.
    Lets see now, is there to be an April 1 sequel to this story ?

    Ken H.
     
  12. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Evening, NZMike,

    Well, I joined the "BIG OL' COLEMAN CLUB" on our recent work trip!! Spurred on by seeing the photos of your 457G, and after talking it all over with Lance, to whom I sent phone photos of the stove in question, I did pick it up on our way back home. It was in Des Moines, Iowa, and the asking price was $48.50, if I recall correctly. I called to see if the seller could do any better, and he lowered it to a flat $40, with which I was very happy, though even this great price cannot beat out yours, Mike!! :clap: :clap: :thumbup:

    Mine turned out to be the Coleman Model 460G Handy Gas Plant, with a 7" burner. Rated Btu's, as I understand it, are 60,000 Btu's!! That's SIXTY THOUSAND, BTU'S, folks!! WOW!!! Yours is no slouch, either, Mike, as it is churning out 35,000 Btu's!! Quite powerful, the both of them, as far as I'm concerned!! Mine has a stuck generator control, but the fuel cap finally came free, and the NRV ball is just fine, which worried me a tad. Mine has the older pressure gauge, so I could tentatively date it to around the 1930's. But, as always, is ALWAYS something new to learn, so I'll keep searching until I get some support for that date, which I gleaned from Mr. Terry Marsh's outstanding website.

    Photo will be posted here, in another thread, but I thought I'd thank you, personally, for enticing me into buying this neat old monster of a stove!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  13. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Correction:

    Friends, I made a mistake on the Btu's of the Model 460. It's not 60,000 Btu's, as I noted, but rather only 50,000 Btu's...... still, not an inconsiderable amount of heat produced, no matter which way you slice it! Sorry for the mistake, however. Should have paid better attention, me thinks! :oops: :whistle: 8-[ :doh: :lol: :lol: Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  14. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Doc. I think that's enough for tea. Mike...
     
  15. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hey, Flivver,

    Well, we're going to find out soon enough, my Friend! I'll make tea for the entire campground, at our upcoming CASG4!! ;) 8) :lol: :lol: By squinting at the photos of BernieDawg's 460G, I see that mine has what's left of that same decal, which denotes that it is, indeed, the Coleman Handy Gas Plant. I was pretty sure of that, but it's nice to have even the remains of the original decal. Talk to you soon, and see you next month. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  16. hikin_jim United States

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    Actually, Doc, you've got it all wrong. That's a thruster from the Space Shuttle!

    Make tea for the entire camp? Make tea for the entire county more like. :)

    HJ
     

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