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Coleman Fyrestorm

Discussion in 'Other Models' started by presscall, Apr 11, 2015.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It comes in stainless steel and titanium versions. This is the s/s one

    1428761513-1.JPG

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    Not pictured is a device to take an inverted isobutane cartridge to provide a fuel feed, something the seller forgot to parcel up with the rest and that's on it's way to me separately - hopefully.

    I bought it as a non-working stove but had a pretty good idea what would be the matter with it. Turns out the component I expected was defective was, but there was an unexpected additional fault, which I'll come to shortly.

    In THIS POST to do with a Coleman Apex fuel pump elbow joint I referred to a Coleman patent ( THIS ONE ) for a fuel pump elbow joint and said,


    I was wrong. I was looking at it on my workbench, incorporated in the Fyrestorm fuel pump - and the rest of the stove was built to that patent specification too

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    The fuel elbow joint I was about to dismantle as the suspected non-working component was an almost-exact match with the patent spec version

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    Problem was obvious as soon as I dismantled the component, the alloy parts in it were tarnished and this piston wouldn't move in the bore, much less 'float' as the patent specified, responding to back-pressure from the burner and the delicate little spring operating on it

    1428761629-11.JPG


    Component parts cleaned up, the piston now 'floated' perfectly

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    1428761664-13.JPG

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    It was then I discovered the second problem.

    Something was rattling about inside the burner and peering up the inlet riser with the generator removed I could see what it was, component No.39 in that patent drawing

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    Detached from the burner, priming and combustion if priming could be achieved would be disrupted.

    Nothing for it but to open up the burner and that meant cutting the securing flange away to separate top from bottom

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    Burner in bits, the offending component that dished washer gadget at the front

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    The spot welding (just visible here) was very poor, no surprise the component had become detached

    1428761788-20.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    'Belt and braces' approach, I decided to rivet and silbraze the component in place.

    Holes for the rivet ...

    1428763805-21.JPG

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    ... soft iron rivet

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    Riveted

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    Here I've silbrazed top and bottom of the burner together and ran a bit of silbraze over the rivet to prevent corrosion (it's iron) and make the joint absolutely gas-tight

    1428763865-26.JPG

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    Cleaned up, burner good as new (probably better, given that poor spot welding)

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    Some details before reassembly.

    Jet isn't removable, so the whole generator would have to be removed if the jet became oversized - although I'd no doubt use my jet DOWNSIZING technique on it before I'd go looking for a replacement generator

    1428763930-30.JPG

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    Not an on-off valve at the stove end, but effective for operating the jet cleaning wire and it does a good job controlling the flame size

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    Jet pushes into the stove assembly nut and is secured with a stainless steel cross-head machine screw

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    Logo

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    Firing up was drama-free. The pump valve with the floating piston and the upturned-dish washer in the roof of the burner evidently did their job. There was no fuel flooding at the burner during the priming phase, yellow flames could be kept to acceptable levels using the valve on the pump and priming was completed in the minute it says in the manual it should be completed in

    1428764020-35.JPG


    Useful simmer setting

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    Simmer/medium/high - very controllable

    1428764063-37.JPG 1428764080-38.JPG 1428764110-39.JPG


    I really like this stove, probably even more so for it's versatility if the seller gets the isobutane rig to me as promised!

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  3. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    John I was bidding on that one to, glad you got it,
    Si
     
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John, Great post of efficient diagnosis and repair.
    Best Regards,
    George.
     
  5. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Hi John,

    Outstanding post of a nice little stove.

    It has the essence of a couple of MSR stoves, like the simmerlite that wasn't well received, but was stiľl a good performer inspite of its reputation.

    Thanks for sharing.

    sam
     
  6. Rickybob United Kingdom

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    outstanding! the burner looks like the one on the coleman 1lb propane stove
    not about to cut it open - i am too far from a big hospital

    Presscall for modulator (emeritus)
     
  7. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Why was this stove never a good seller?
    It looks robust and light and powerful
     
  8. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John brilliant fettle and tutorial, you really are a expert in these MSR type stoves.
    I am all ways amazed at the quality and depth of all your work well done John
     
  9. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Good Morning, John, and All,

    Another brilliant fettle, Presscall, and a lovely result!! As to why this stove was not more popular, I recall reading that others had problems with it, too, and it's very possible, if not probably, that the quality control at Coleman had then slipped to the point that the resulting stove was far too "hit or miss" in it's ability to function properly. Just guessing, but it "fits" the new Coleman business practices, IMHO.

    Now that you have shined the light on several areas of failure, John, and shown others how they might be able to fettle them, I am hoping that more folks might give this stove a try. Thanks to your always excellent work, others might have similar success to yours!! Well done, as usual, and many thanks for sharing your skills and results with everyone! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     
  10. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A hearty thanks for the responses All (and it's not a good feeling to baulk a chum in an auction bid, though I didn't know at the time, Si).

    Geeves posed a very good question ...

    ... and I believe Doc Mark was exactly right when he suggested that it was ...

    That's consistently the issue with a sample of reviews, like these from Trailspace ... REVIEWS

    Sadly, although the stove worked perfectly for me yesterday, today the weather was colder and windier and in spite of adequate windshielding it dragged out start-up, with sooty yellow flames for far too long a duration - nearer three minutes than the one minute specification.

    Once running it settled down into that characteristic pattern of a controllable flame but it set me to thinking what had happened.

    I let the stove cool down and went back to it, blowlamp in hand this time to offer a little priming assistance and discovered that the key component to get up to vapourisation heat is the burner rose. It's quite a size and apart from the brass riser tube it's constructed entirely of stainless steel (including the mesh inside it) and that's not the best conductor of heat.

    So, for start-ups in warm ambient temperature the stove performs as intended. When the weather offers more of a challenge, it becomes temperamental and fuel isn't vapourised well enough on start-up.

    The lean mixture for start-up produced by what is otherwise a very well thought-out and efficient fuel/air mixture valve in the pump proves too lean for ignition in the cold environment of the burner.

    I may make this an extended fettling project, to fabricate a smaller burner rose in brass that will heat up quicker and more reliably. I think there's a good chance it would remove that 'hit or miss' element that Doc referred to.

    Oh yes, a comparison pic of the Apex (bottom) and the Fyrestorm fuel pumps. Shared pump body and control valve, variation in the other details, but both intended to create a lean fuel/air mixture for a 'quick start' without a need for priming

    1428853621-40.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  11. theyellowdog New Zealand

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    It was a pricey stove here
     
  12. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I said earlier the seller of the stove hadn't packed with it the assembly to connect up an inverted isobutane canister.

    It arrived, but with an apology that when found it was missing a tripod leg. Another repair to do!

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    End of the working week and other chores done, it didn't take too long to make up a replacement leg from some recycled brass sheet from a clock frame (hence all the micro-holes)

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    The brass was a shade thinner than the die-cast alloy so I'd to make a spacer washer or the fold-out and stow action would have been sloppy

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    Hardly a match, but functional

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    In one of the reviews I posted a link to earlier the unfortunate user said,


    Now I've had a go at using the isobutane attachment I've a good idea why that accident occurred.

    The hose connector to the fuel bottle pump, or with a canister, the valve on the tripod stand is a metal-to-metal contact and requires a fair twist of the knurled connectors to make the joint gas-tight.

    With the tripod stand, one of the legs (which can't be moved out of the way) leaves little room for the fingers to apply enough torque to the connector ...

    1429382486-50.JPG


    Much easier to tighten up the connector on the fuel bottle pump

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    Metal-to-metal

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    Although it was easy to get the connector fuel-tight for white gasoline, it wasn't at all easy to ensure a gas-tight joint on isobutane. Simple solution was to pop a small O-ring over the locating pin/shut-off valve

    1429382556-54.JPG


    Although I'm finding that lighting the stove on white gasoline is comparable to tickling a carburettor, getting the degree of throttle right then lunging at the kick-start on an old British motorbike - sometimes tricky - it's a doddle to get it underway on isobutane

    1429382577-55.JPG


    Controllable ...

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    ... and the liquefied gas feed from the inverted canister suggests it should perform well in cold conditions.

    As the Yellowdog pointed out, it was a pricey stove brand-new.

    Too much for a gas canister stove with a hit-or-miss starting performance on white gasoline.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  13. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good spread of flame on simmer though ...

    1429387384-59.JPG


    ... and a speedy pot-boiler on maximum

    1429387397-58.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  14. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    John if you ever need to sell this one on mate, I'm your man, brilliant fettle. What's the story with the clock plates, where you a clock repairer at one time as well, I forgot to ask last time we met?

    Si
     
  15. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The clocks, Si?

    I fixed a mantlepiece chiming clock from Smiths of Enfield and picked up a scrap one to cannibalise for parts. The plates came out of that. Just a one-off project. Heck of a lot of brass in those Smiths. I'm still using it up.

    Hope to see you at Newark.

    John
     
  16. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    Ok mate will be at Newark but only till Sat morning as it's my Godsons wedding in the afternoon. Dam that date change!

    Si
     
  17. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    In THIS post in the Action Gallery, CCS member Odd asked,


    Happy to oblige!

    Here's an exploded view - I hope that never becomes too literal given the function of the device, to hold and control a gas cartridge

    1429479617-60.JPG


    The control valve spindle. It has two O-rings side-by-side to make the seal

    1429479851-61.JPG

    A shoulder formed in the spindle meets the stop created by that forked arrangement on the top tripode leg in the stack, so doesn't unscrew completely out when assembled. Good job too

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    Now I've dismantled it, the fitting to take the gas cart is a more complex device than I thought, thanks to that chrome screwed fitting in the base, which I'll show a close-up of in a moment

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    There's a sintered fuel filter gas-cart side of the chrome screwed fitting

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    ... the fitting is very small

    1429479972-69.JPG


    ... but incorporates a pierced jewel (looks like agate) which I suppose acts as a jet to monitor the flow of liquefied gas to the stove

    1429479985-70.JPG


    I wasn't expecting that ... must try the stove without the jewelled jet - might flood the burner?


    Ready to screw back into the aluminium block, using a bit of thread sealant

    1429480000-71.JPG


    Over to the outlet/hose fitting now, removed with an 8mm hex socket, the square shank of the wrench just about getting a purchase in the socket, since the sprung-loaded spigot on the fitting gets in the way slightly

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    Action of the fail-safe device that ensures that even if the control valve were open, there'd be no gas discharge until the stove was coupled up to it

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    My fix, discussed earlier in this thread, to create a good seal for gas by slipping an O-ring on the connector spigot

    1429480089-76.JPG

    1429480107-77.JPG


    It obviously reduced clearances, but when the fitting's screwed tight it just raises the seal spigot mechanism and allows gas to flow

    1429480130-78.JPG


    Finally, shot of the tripod legs, including the one I'd to fabricate to replace one of the die-cast ones

    1429480148-79.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  18. Odd Sweden

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    Ouch, much more complicated than I had expected! Thanks for showing all this detail.
    /Odd
     
  19. Jelte Klas Netherlands

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    They have re-used the name, it seems! I suddenly encountered this on the Decathlon site:
    [​IMG]
     
  20. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Yes, saw one of those advertised. The perforated metal is intended as a windscreen.
     

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