1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Coleman No. 2E - 1933

Discussion in 'Coleman No:2' started by idahostoveguy, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,352
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    Here's the first in a series of Coleman No. 2's. Many thanks to Spiritburner (Ross) for creating the new Coleman No. 2 category. It'll be nice not to lose track of the No. 2s as they come in.

    This one happens to be a Coleman Model 2E, I believe from 1933. I believe it's a 2E since it has the original brown maroon paint and because of the main fuel valve on the tank is slanted upward, which is typical of the 2E and 9E. The difference between the 2E and the 9E is that the 9E has no oven. Other than that, they are the same, with maybe some minor differences.



    1335680860-coleman2E1933-01.jpg


    I had a rough time getting this one going. The generator was completely locked up. You don't want to turn the flame control knob if it won't move with even a little pressure, otherwise, the cleaning needle rod will break off inside the generator and the end of it that screws into the control valve will break off and then you become stuck with a broken valve and no cleaning needle for the jet.

    I carefully took this one apart, spraying oil and liquid wrench liberally into the jet and into the valve after I had removed the packing nut. It had come off of the cleaning needle rod, which was stuck inside of the generator - it hadn't broken off - whew! Once the packing nut was removed I could spray more loosening sauce into the generator and let it soak. After soaking, I still had to get the cleaning rod out amidst all of the 6 generator rods that surround it. It took a little work, but eventually, I was able to remove the cleaning needle rod and then clean out all of the carbon from the generator and assemble it all back together. I now have a very nice operating Coleman 2E with most of the oven. I don't have the oven rack, but my other 2E has one that I'll be able to duplicate. That other 2E will come up in another post, since it has a few other interesting bits that make it very interesting.


    1335680874-coleman2E1933-02.jpg


    The stove came with what looks like original instructions and the original wrench. It also arrived with two generators that looks like they don't work, but look to be complete, but frozen.



    1335680879-coleman2E1933-03.jpg


    The oven comes attached to the lid of the stove so that it won't get lost like on the original No. 1s. The oven on this one folds up nicely and installs nicely. The next few pictures show the action of disassembly of the oven. The photo below show removal of the tabs from the back of the oven.



    1335680885-coleman2E1933-04.jpg


    Folding down the top is what's next and a bit tricky to maneuver the oven while making the fold. Once folded, the remaining pieces can be used as the windbreak, while the other could be used as a table or work area of some sort. The towel rack is just the right size to hold up the lid.

    1335680890-coleman2E1933-05.jpg

    1335680898-coleman2E1933-06.jpg


    If you don't like the small table work area, you can always fold it up and flip the rack over to hold it in place so that it operates as if there were no oven.


    1335680912-coleman2E1933-07.jpg

    Of course, you could fold it all down and create a work area on the stove without the windscreen as long as there is no wind to contend with.

    1335680921-coleman2E1933-08.jpg


    Here's that slanted main valve. I read somewhere that the valve is slanted so the fuel pickup tube can be pointed down into the tank and so that the air orifice would not have fuel in it when the stove is first lit, since this stove is instant lighting. No priming is necessary like the old No. 2's, which use the Hot Blast, which I like very much.

    1335680932-coleman2E1933-09.jpg


    The following is a photo of the instruction disk on the main valve. Not sure this is original or not, but seems to be. Not much has changed for this early model on through then next 80 years. I followed the instructions on the disk and the stove lit right up.


    1335680943-coleman2E1933-10.jpg


    Here we have, what I believe is, the original wrench. I tried it on several of the nuts on the stove and it seemed to fit. As a matter of fact, I used it on the generator to tear it down and fix it. Worked perfectly.


    1335680956-coleman2E1933-11.jpg


    The pump was in excellent shape and didn't need replaced. It pumps efficiently and smoothly. It only takes a few strokes to start building pressure. I did replace the gasket in the fuel filler cap, which was as hard as a rock. The tank now has an air-tight seal. I left it pressurized with 50 strokes of air for two weeks and didn't appear to lose any air during that time.


    1335680968-coleman2E1933-12.jpg


    The spring auxiliary fuel control knob. Works great. I'm not sure it was a good design since you have to bend the spring to get it into the case when the burner is put away.


    1335680979-coleman2E1933-13.jpg


    The burner has stamped on it, Coleman Made in USA.

    1335680994-coleman2E1933-14.jpg


    The burner plate has the old Coleman logo that's been seen on many old lanterns. Both burner plates are stamped that way. I have another No. 2 that has neither one stamped.

    1335681001-coleman2E1933-15.jpg


    Interesting way to hold down the main valve. You don't see that anymore, but then again, it simple and it works. Very easy to remove the generator once the retainer is removed.


    1335681013-coleman2E1933-16.jpg


    Here's an interesting piece on the fuel line that goes through the case. I'm guessing that the purpose was to make sure the fuel tank was place the correct distance from the case and also to protect the fuel line from the edges of the case.

    1335681025-coleman2E1933-17.jpg


    Shot of the main burner. It has those vents that emit large flamelets when the stove is burning. Definitely not a silent burner. It sounds like a roarer but not quite, more like a Coleman 502 jet air craft. You know it's on when it's on.

    1335681037-coleman2E1933-18.jpg


    Here's what the spring control knob.


    1335681045-coleman2E1933-19.jpg


    The burner holder plate, which is in the back of the case of the stove. Holds the whole cast iron burner assembly when all parts are put away.

    1335681052-coleman2E1933-20.jpg


    More to follow....


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,352
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    Continuing our discussion of this No. 2E, we have below the diffuser plate that is used when the oven is setup and operating. It is made of very thin but durable plate, which looks like stainless steel.


    1335684346-coleman2E1933-21.jpg



    Here are the instructions that came with this stove. It looks to be original and is complete.

    1335684356-coleman2E1933-22.jpg


    Taking a close look at the bottom of the instructions, there appears to be the date of April, 1933 (4-33). This seems to be correct according to Coleman advertisements during that time, which show this stove in 1933 ads but not in earlier ones. I could be wrong on that, of course, but it could be true for this specific instance.

    1335684363-coleman2E1933-23.jpg


    Everything, of course, folds up and can be put away inside of the case. Once put together, the stove ways somewhere around 28 pounds. Very heavy, especially for shipping, although domestically, the shipping wasn't too bad.

    1335684369-coleman2E1933-24.jpg


    Well, once I got everything in working order, I lit the stove on several occasions. The following shots are not the first light up of the stove. It's been going for a while now and it works great. The first shot is a priming burn, while the air is being mixed in high concentrations in the fuel to instant light the stove. Takes about a minute to get to blue.

    1335684375-coleman2E1933-25.jpg


    Well, I won't spoil the fun. See the shots as they go...

    1335684382-coleman2E1933-26.jpg


    1335684389-coleman2E1933-27.jpg


    1335684397-coleman2E1933-28.jpg


    1335684403-coleman2E1933-29.jpg


    1335684410-coleman2E1933-30.jpg


    1335684417-coleman2E1933-31.jpg


    1335684425-coleman2E1933-32.jpg


    1335684434-coleman2E1933-33.jpg


    1335684442-coleman2E1933-34.jpg


    1335684457-coleman2E1933-35.jpg


    1335684464-coleman2E1933-36.jpg


    The following are some actions shots I took while we were out for the weekend. The stove really operates quite nicely even in a 20 MPH wind. Windscreens and my truck blocked the wind perfectly.

    1335684472-coleman2E1933-37.jpg



    There are some folks in the background playing with fire too...

    1335684480-coleman2E1933-38.jpg


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  3. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,189
    Location:
    Harlow Essex
    Hi Sam brilliant addition to your collection and superb pics and documented break downand fettle,of a brilliant old coleman classic suitcase stove,i realy like the flame pattern on this model well done there Sam
     
  4. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    6,473
    Location:
    USA
    Very nice stove and great photos, too.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Ken
     
  5. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    Arizona
    Hi Sam: Great score. I was always amazed at how long the #2 was manufactured and haw many subsequent stoves were being manufactured at the same time. Similar to the 425's long production run of later years. Mike...
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    15,036
    Morning, Sam,

    Outstanding stove, and well found, Sir!! :clap: :clap: 8) :thumbup: :D It's great to see one so complete, and seeing your photos it was also easy to see the differences between this particular model, and the others in that family tree of great Coleman stoves! Thanks for the full report, and great photos!! Congrats on getting this one, Sam, and thanks for sharing it with us!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc

    P.S. Nice to see Brother Flivver chime in on this one, too!!
     
  7. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,352
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    Thanks for the kind comments everyone. I like getting these oldies back into service doing what they do best.

    I forgot to mention that I did a boil test on this stove at 4700ft/1430km elevation, 45F/7C ambient temperature, no wind, 1-liter of around 45F/7C water in a stainless steel kettle. It took about 5:20 to get to boil, which is respectable considering age and the burner distance being further away than most backpacking stoves. I probably lost more heat than what was hitting the kettle! I've used larger kettles with more water and have had pleasing results. It does burn hot for being nearly 80 years old at the time of this writing.

    I do have to say that the design and manufacturing of such a complicated piece after only a few years of making stoves was quite brilliant and of very fine manufacturing quality. I believe Coleman had only been making stoves for about 10 years up to this point. Lanterns had been around for roughly 20 years, but I think W.C. Coleman's enthusiasm and strictness for quality is what made them last for so long, even with steel tanks. There is no rust on the tank of this stove. Plenty of surface rust on the case, but I'll take of that.

    Well, on to my next No. 2... and working my way to the No. 1s.


    sam
     
  8. hikerduane

    hikerduane United States Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2010
    Messages:
    4,267
    Location:
    Northern Sierra Nevada
    Thanks Sam, my home puter takes too long to load photos. Glad you got the boys and friends out. My PW #3 has a oven too, I gotta get to that thing. Not sure how it all folds out, another tough nut.
    Duane
     
  9. hipburwig

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    i just bought a 2E. its in pretty good shape. can any one point me in the right direction for the pump cup? it seems to be a different size than all my lanterns and lamps and stoves which is too big. i have a 9D and its pump is too small. did your stove come with nickel legs? mine are painted brown like the rest?
     
  10. hipburwig

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    after looking at parts lists i see i had some that work but very tight. pump it up and the check valve leaks. where can i get one? i tried soaking it with thinner and brake clean but it still wont seal
     
  11. NW Lady

    NW Lady United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2016
    Messages:
    167
    Location:
    Washington State
    I recently got a 2d. Have a question about folding the oven down. When I look at picture #8... looks like the last thing folded in are the side panels, not the u shaped bracket that supports the stove when it is laid behind (back) of the stove. is this correct ? thank you
     

Share This Page