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Coleman Peak 1 550, ca. 1986 - Complete Teardown

Discussion in 'Coleman Peak 1' started by idahostoveguy, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Well, here you go a Coleman 550 that I found for $15 with all you see below. I'm not sure it was worth what I paid for it. It had some problems, big problems. ](*,) Otherwise, according to model number this is the first 550 as it has no 'A' or 'B' in the number. :D/ As far as I know the stove has no date stamp anywhere except on the instructions that came with it. One difference to mention right off the bat is the fuel cap isn't the tethered type as on later 550s.

    I know, there are some of you out there that don't like the 550 series of stoves. :lol: That's ok, this isn't my favorite stove but I don't have a disdain for it either. I thought I would post what I have anyway for those that do.

    1290610816-Coleman550-499-01.jpg


    The first thing I noticed was the whole side of the stove where the main valve is from the burner to the instructions below there, it appeared to have been on fire. The instructions were singed to a nice little tan, obviously not from a tanning salon.

    As I got to playing with it, I turned the knob and the whole valve and fuel pickup moved like it was just hand tightened and loose to the tank. As you can see in the photos below, the main valve and fuel pickup looks brand new. I did no clean up of it and found it to be in perfect condition, as in new old stock condition. It probably is new but it sure wouldn't have fixed the stove.


    The second problem I found was that there was probably decades old layers of carbon deposits that were in the burner bowl (which the seller had attempted to scratch out before selling) and between each of the burner rings. I could not see any hole that would have let flames pass through. When I tore down the stove, I realized that the mixing chamber, the rings and burner bowl are one complete unit and are held together by a flared retainer tube. To get at the rings and clean them thoroughly, my only solution was to drill out the retainer. I managed to drill just enough of the flared tube so the retainer could let go of the stack but be usable when I put the parts back together. That appeared to work.

    1290610827-Coleman550-499-02.jpg 1290614204-Coleman550-499-02b.jpg

    Of course, the rings were stuck together until I could chip away at the deposits and break them loose from each other. I had to brush down each ring until every speck was gone. Tedious to be borne for sure. I think this also acted as a preservative as there was no rust nor was any of the rings worn thin. They were still stiff and strong.

    If you've never seen the inside of the mixing chamber before, well, it's interesting to see how simple it is. The generator passes through the wall of the main chamber and then through the wall of the air inlet tube, which gets it's air from beneath the burner bowl where there is a hole for that purpose. Once I got things cleaned up, I sandwiched everything back together and found that the chamber screw held things together quite nicely.

    1290610876-Coleman550-499-03a.jpg 1290610883-Coleman550-499-03b.jpg

    One of the design items that I thought was interesting was the number of O-rings the main valve has! :shock: There are five O-rings that would have potentially needed replacing but since the valve and fuel pickup were new, I didn't have to. If you are refurbing yours, you will probably want to find these O-rings and replace them.

    1290610915-Coleman550-499-05.jpg

    Another design item is the main valve spindle is not threaded in! :shock: It is merely inserted until flush and then held on with a spring steel clip. I was a bit nervous about removing the clip since I could have busted it off in the process and would have permanently damaged the stove. Whew! I guess the valve has two O-rings, the first to stop fuel from passing, the other as a redundancy measure in case the first fails. But how would you know when the first O-ring failed? Hmmmmm.

    1290610930-Coleman550-499-07.jpg

    I installed the Coleman Fuel generator instead of the kerosene generator to keep the stove clean. The kerosene generator is the one on the left in the photo with the notched retaining nut. Ok, ok, I'll try out the kerosene gennie later for you kero-fuel fanatics! :doh:

    There are some other interesting details but I'll let you find them yourselves.

    1290610898-Coleman550-499-04.jpg 1290610923-Coleman550-499-06.jpg 1290610940-Coleman550-499-08.jpg 1290610948-Coleman550-499-09.jpg 1290610963-Coleman550-499-10.jpg 1290610973-Coleman550-499-11.jpg 1290610981-Coleman550-499-12.jpg 1290610991-Coleman550-499-13.jpg 1290610999-Coleman550-499-14.jpg 1290611006-Coleman550-499-15.jpg 1290611015-Coleman550-499-16.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. RonPH

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    Sam, its a good stove, easy to light on coleman fuel. Only qualms would be soft aluminum pot supports so no heavy cast iron pots :rage:

    Ron
     
  3. linux_author

    linux_author United States Subscriber

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    Wow! great job and thank you for the tear down!

    interesting that today's 550b does not come with the fiberglass matting - must have an owner add on as there's no indication of one in Coleman's parts listing or diagram for this model?

    EDIT: there *is* a part, #550-4615 "Insulation"! but no price and shown as 'Unavailable' (and not included with any recent 550b that i know of?)

    btw, i run kero in my 550b and it burns very clean - no soot whatsoever *IF* given a hot prime!
     
  4. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Actually, the pot supports and semi-windscreen are made of steel, so is the burner bowl. The main bowl is made of aluminum and the collar is too. The collar and outer bowl would collapse under heavy weight, probably the tank would too since it is made of the thinnest metal on the stove, but since it is pressurized, it'll hold up. It's lightweight, so only lightweight pots and pans for a couple, few people. It'll still hold up a few pounds but not much more than that.


    sam
     
  5. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    I've noticed that these were the only models with the insulation. I had another before with the same insulation. I suppose it keeps everything underneath a bit cooler, but it must not have made a big difference so it is not included in the later models. I can't tell the difference, it's hot anyway!

    Thanks,
    sam
     
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  6. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Here's the other one I had before. A few more details of the same model. This one as a different main valve and fuel pickup with same metal clip to retain the valve.

    I also forgot to mention, the first stove above was probably made in Canada since the instructions were printed in Canada. This stove has a stamping on the bottom of the tank, 1 - 88 Made in Canada. So, a strong indication that the first could have been made there too.

    You'll notice the insulation found under the burner bowl. Not found in later models.

    sam



    1290617379-Coleman550MultiFuel-01.jpg
    Coleman 550 Multi-Fuel Stove.


    1290617386-Coleman550MultiFuel-02.jpg 1290617393-Coleman550MultiFuel-03.jpg 1290617401-Coleman550MultiFuel-04.jpg 1290617416-Coleman550MultiFuel-05.jpg 1290617425-Coleman550MultiFuel-06.jpg 1290617432-Coleman550MultiFuel-07.jpg 1290617439-Coleman550MultiFuel-08.jpg 1290617446-Coleman550MultiFuel-09.jpg 1290617452-Coleman550MultiFuel-10.jpg 1290617460-Coleman550MultiFuel-11.jpg 1290617467-Coleman550MultiFuel-12.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  7. itchy United States

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    Excellent work, picture and description.

    A good while back there was some discussion about which 550 generator has the notched nut. Turns out, everyone, regardless of position, was right. While the US version of the gasoline generator has the notches, it is just the opposite for the Canandian made generators. For those, the kero generator has the notches as you described.
     
  8. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Here you go. The instructions apparently say that the kerosene generator has a chrome nut rather than the notched nut. Apparently the kero generator for this stove is not original. Also, according to the instructions, the main valve has to be changed to a kerosene valve, marked 'K', which has a straight tube rather than the typical fuel pickup tube. Makes me wonder what the later models' designs are.


    1290621952-Coleman550-499-17a.jpg
    Coleman 550 parts diagram.

    1290621956-Coleman550-499-17b.jpg
    Zoom of kerosene application.


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  9. Knight84 Canada

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    Damn Canadian stoves! Great work Sam.

    The valve design was used on the 505B stoves also made in Canada. The thought was o-rings are better in cold conditions than graphite packings. I am not sure about that but the design of the valve and clip would make it easy to change orings.

    Thanks,
    Jeff
     
  10. DAVE GIBSON United States

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    nice work and great photos,there is more than enough there for someone to follow and do their own work.you guys who strip down these stoves to the last O ring always get a pat on the back from me.if i try and the first screw won't turn i'll back off and find another project.
     
  11. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thank you, Sam. I really enjoyed such a thorough exploration of that stove. Just the sort of detailed analysis I appreciate.

    I've an Apex stove which evidently has pretty much the same burner arrangement and it's interesting to see the interior of the riveted burner assembly.

    Similar arrangement on those little Coleman 222 lanterns.

    Wonderful post Sam!

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  12. potato

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    hello! nice to find this camp stove forum.nice job with your coleman ,i really enjoyed it and learned a lot.i just bought a coleman peak 1, in pretty bad condition, but i want to make it functional.i will make a thread with my work as it is my first camping stove which i try to fix.sry for my bad english!have fun all of you.
     
  13. jamesj741

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    My Coleman 550a would also not stay lit.

    Here's how I fixed it:

    1. Stripped the stove down.

    * All you need is an adjustable spanner and a smallish flat headed screw driver

    2. Cleaned Generator Assembly:

    * Pulled out the wire from the brass generator and cleaned it with a scouring pad

    * Removed the threaded end piece when the fuel is expelled

    * Cleaned the brass body of the generator with some "Cillit Bang" cleaner (leave it to soak for 30 mins in the stuff that cleans coins)

    * Reassembled, re-threading the wire is tricky, but be patient. I have done this a few times now...


    3. Cleaned Valve Assembly:

    * Cillit Bang soak again, plus I used a small pin to clear out the hole that sucks up the fuel (just don't widen it too much)

    4. Reassemble

    My 20 year old stove is now working perfectly again after 15 years in the loft.
     

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