1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Early Phoebus No. 725 with original simmer plate

Discussion in 'Phoebus' started by Radler, Dec 5, 2015.

  1. Radler

    Radler Switzerland Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Location:
    Bodensee (Switzerland)
    This Stove form Austria is not restored yet. The coating is partly burnt off. But the stove came with one of the rare original simmer plates!
    DSC00517.JPG

    The stove has a marking "N 26" on the bottom. This code is not understood yet.
    DSC00526a.JPG

    The simmer plate in position, marginal edge up. Due to the heath, especially when there is no pot on it, the plate gets deformed in short time and starts to rust. Maybe this is the reason, why so few of the plates have survived. Later Phoebus No. 725 had no simmer plate.
    In the background is a frying pan of equal age.
    DSC00522a.JPG

    The hottest gases pass below the simmer plate. The air space between the simmer plate and the pot keeps the heath partially off.
    DSC00521a.JPG
    DSC00523a.JPG

    View of the plate. The rectangular slot serves to remove the hot plate with the tip of a knife or the grip of a spoon.
    DSC00525a.JPG

    Best Regards
    Radler
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2015
  2. Wim

    Wim Belgium Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    3,531
    Location:
    Dendermonde, Belgium
    Hi Radler, I've never seen this kind of simmer plate before! It looks very thin to me, like 0,5mm at the most. No wonder they don't survive long......
    Thanks for sharing!

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,008
    Location:
    UK
    @Radler
    New to me too. I'm not presuming to challenge your superior knowledge on this, but is there evidence that the simmer plate was an original Phoebus accessory?

    John
     
  4. Radler

    Radler Switzerland Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Location:
    Bodensee (Switzerland)
    @ Wim
    The plate is not as flimsy as it may look like. It's 0.65 mm thick. I treated it with phosphoric acid to stop rust. this is the reason for the dirty colour

    @presscall
    I have seen only three of these plates in my live. I think the first one was with my father's Phoebus No. 725, he acquired it about 1949, the second was in the box of an early Phoebus No. 625, which I found in scrap metal thirty years back. The third is the one here, which I got from Austria last year. The first two I did not keep. I did not use them, I only tried them out several times and was not convinced. They were soon as rusty, or more, as this one. It was very annoying to have them in the stove's box because everything got littered with rust particles.

    I wish I had the instruction leaflets of the tree stoves, maybe the plates are mentioned there. I have no doubt they are original Phoebus parts.

    The one problem was, the plates were not very efficient because of their size, given by the size of the box. The second problem was the corrosion due to the aggressive gases in the flame zone and the deformation by heath. This gave them a filthy look, not acceptable with a quality product, so I understand quite well, why their production was given up soon.

    Size is given by the box, not by function:
    DSC00527a.JPG

    Best Regards,
    Radler
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,008
    Location:
    UK
    @Radler
    Good enough evidence for me, thanks Radler.

    John
     
  6. Wim

    Wim Belgium Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    3,531
    Location:
    Dendermonde, Belgium
    :thumbup:!

    Wim
     

Share This Page