1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Fettling materials & tools - what to use & where to find them

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Spiritburner, Aug 12, 2009.

  1. Knight84 Canada

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    3,236
    I bought this tool from Gary (BernieDawg) a few weeks ago. For something like 10 dollars. Well it paid for itself today. Remove a wick from a Optimus 8 and replaced it with a new one. Was tricky but it worked.

    1299462815-100_1525_opt.jpg

    1299462823-100_1527_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Chef BC United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,632
    Kinda like being a gyne-stove-cologist 8-[ :whistle: 8-[
     
  3. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    5,995
    Location:
    USA
    I am awaiting a vintage Optimus 5 in the mail. I have read a lot, and have gotten help from George (Kerophile). I may not soak or clean this stove, but if I do, does anyone know chemistry, would this product harm the brass? It seems safe on my plastic, paper, and metal filters from my coffee roaster. The paper doesn't get bleached clean, but it quickly removes everything and soaking overnight only improves it.

    Thanks,
    Ken in NC

    Coffee Equipment Wash
    Link

    Like all Full Circle™ products, Full Circle™ Coffee Equipment Wash is completely phosphate free, all ingredients are renewable, sustainable and naturally occurring, and every jar is made from recycled packaging with a digitally printed label.

    Each 500 gram jar of product is perfect for back flushing traditional espresso machines, soaking coffee and espresso machine parts, and cleaning coffee brewers.

    Concentrated Full Circle™ formula eliminates coffee residue in group heads and valves with a balance of foam and solubility for optimal rinsing.

    Sodium bicarbonate: Also called baking soda, helps dough rise in cookies and bread. In our application, it assists in delivering oxygen bubbles to the surface of your coffee machine.

    Sodium carbonate: Often used in toothpaste and baking German pretzels, this naturally occurring salt is found in the hills of Wyoming and can be derived from seaweed. It is a great cleaning agent that changes the pH.

    Sodium gluconate: Used in dairy products and diet foods, this ingredient helps break down and rinse away soils. It is produced by fermentation of glucose (sugars).

    Sodium citrate: Derived from corn sugar via fermentation, this salt regulates acidity in the cleaning product. It can also be found on the ingredient list of some of your favorite energy drinks.

    Sodium percarbonate: This is a key ingredient used in toothpaste for its oxygen based bleaching abilities.

    Sodium coco-sulfate: As the name suggests, a terrific foaming agent and surfactant produced from coconut oils.

    Alkyl polyglycosides: The scariest sounding ingredient is produced from the combination of alcohols and glucose. These sugars are derived from coconut, palm, and corn oil. This is a 100% renewable surfactant that would otherwise need to be produced from petroleum products.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  4. yonadav

    yonadav Israel Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    2,338
    Location:
    Israel
    Hi Ken,

    I suspect you are not planning to roast coffee beans on the brass surface of your Optimus 5, so why bother with the coffee machine cleaner?

    All I do to restore brass tanks (and other brass parts) to their like-new condition is to soak them for 15 - 20 minutes in lukewarm citric acid ("lemon salt") solution. This is fast, cheap, simple, and risk free. Citric acid works well on the tanks, pump tubes, burner heads, valves, and anything else made of brass. It removes patina, stains, soot and carbon. Other, more aggressive methods are required for removing baked gunk from the inside tubing of burner heads and generators.

    Yonadav
     
  5. Sparky

    Sparky United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,481
    Location:
    Cypress, Texas
    I'm a believer in citric acid soaks. Don't leave the parts in and forget about them, though. They will turn pink indicating that the zinc has been leached out of the surface of the brass. You can restore the brass finish with some 0000 steel wool or fine polish.
     
  6. Blue Flame

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2011
    Messages:
    120
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  7. expat United Kingdom

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Messages:
    233
    B&Q have been selling "Bar Keepers Friend". It's a powder containing citric acid monohydrate, sodium carbonate and oxalic acid - can be used on a damp cloth as a rub to clean brass etc. and also as a paste to leave for a bit to work. May be of use - it seems to work well, but it recommends to rinse after use - until I know exactly the long term effect on brass, I'm being cautious!
     
  8. Nordicthug United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,968
    Location:
    Mountlake Terrace, in the Puget Sound basin.
    "Bar Keeper's Friend" has been around seemingly for millenia. I'm pretty sure paleofauna and early man used it for cleaning and polishing teeth, beaks and claws. It will clean almost anything off almost anything else. As it is used cold and by hand it almost never causes a problem. I've gotten black goo off the outsides and insides of alum(i)um, brass, and copper cookpots and stove parts. I've cleaned metal rub marks off china, coral and ceramics, scratches and paint rubs off automobile chrome, wheels, and paintwork.

    I've gotten 30 year old stains off plastic laminate (Formica) counter tops with it, leaving no trace. It works on varnished surfaces, granite, marble, and synthetic stone such as Corian. Good Stuff. My only caveat is that it might leave too glossy a surface. All it takes is a little elbow grease and a good water rinse.

    Gerry
     
  9. Nordicthug United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,968
    Location:
    Mountlake Terrace, in the Puget Sound basin.
    Let's not forget our friend "Harbor Freight". I don't know if they have a presence in Europe, Asia, and Australia/New Zealand, but I am a faithful customer. The staff in the So. Everett, Wa. store know me by my first name and are unfailingly helpful.

    I have several HF mini machines, an 8"X12" screw cutting lathe, a mini vertical milling machine, and an 8" bench top drill press. I also have most of my tooling for the lathe and mill from HF. Of course there are myriad small hand tools and shop supplies from HF.

    One must, however, keep in mind that HF products are built to meet a price and can be of less than the highest quality. If one keeps that in mind HF is a very good source of machinery, tooling, hand tools, and shop supplies.

    My next purchase will be a low voltage solar charging system for my deep cycle CPAP and Trolling Motor batteries for off the grid use.

    A camping buddy has the system I want to build and has used it almost continuously for ten years with no failures. The components are a bit higher priced now, but as the snail eaters say: "C'est la guerre." Or is it "C'est la vie?"

    Gerry
     
  10. frg7700

    frg7700 United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Messages:
    470
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    Discovered this stuff while looking for something to kill limescale in a kettle.

    http://www.tesco.com/groceries/Product/Details/?id=255281811

    The only active ingredient listed is citric acid monohydrate, comes out a bit like watery Jif/Cif.

    Can confirm that a splash of it an a rub with a nylon pot scrub takes a brass tank back to more or less where it was after you last polished it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  11. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    5,995
    Location:
    USA
    UPDATE: Bar Keepers Friend (with a little elbow grease) and Citric Acid solution (from bulk powder I buy).
    It's all I need.

    Ken in NC
     
  12. BOATGUY66

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    I had trouble finding the chemicals listed so I went to my local dollar store and purchased a large bottle of lemon juice. I added some water and it works great for cleaning me SVEA 123 and my Optimus 96. Just another source for cleaning the brass. You still have to watch as the parts will turn pink after a while.
     
  13. Afterburner Finland

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    1,130
    This is an excellent place to buy threading tools:

    http://stores.ebay.de/go-Werkzeuge?_rdc=1

    They have coarse, fine and extra fine taps and dies is stock for metric and imperial threads.

    Delivery is quite fast. They shipped on same day that I bought items. For some reason shop is not "visible" in UK ebay, but you can search correct item on ebay.de, copy article number to UK ebay and make order in UK ebay (If your German skills are as poor as mine :-k ).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  14. 18406ej United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    I am in the States (but parents are Irish Immigrants), and was having an enormously difficult time removing burner rings from my Coleman 502 stoves. I tried heat, a heat/freeze series (liquid nitrogen), electrolysis, Channel-Lock pliers and soaking oils on my first unit. Not a budge. So I put the stoves away in the shed to let my frustrations cool for a few months.

    Then I read on a different forum about how one gentleman had no difficulty loosening the 502 burner ring using a Sears/Craftsman 3-arm oil filter removal (currently priced at $12.99). I am a bit of a cheapskate because my wife tells me to be so, and went first to the local Harbor Freight store. There I found a similar 3-arm wrench (item 69021) for half the price.

    The Sears model has steel arms. The Harbor Freight has steel arms, but are capped at the tips with silicone-like rubber. I applied the wrench to one of the stoves that I had previously been unable to open, and upon which I had not attempted any pre-loosening procedures. Voila! One pull of the 3/8" socket wrench and the burner thread popped free. As did the rings on the other two stoves.

    I assume that these wrenches have been mentioned here, but I wanted to put in a plug for the Harbor Freight model. It seemed to me that the wide rubber pads really gripped the narrow burner ring well without causing any damage, while I would be fearful of deformation of the ring if I were to apply the Sears wrench with its narrow steel jaws.

    Eamon
     
  15. bajabum

    bajabum United States R.I.P. Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Messages:
    7,364
    Location:
    California Coast
    A strap wrench works well, too.
     
  16. Ian_A

    Ian_A United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Scotland
    I was looking for a suitable pricker wire for an Optimus 96.

    The measured diameter on a genuine Primus 4122 pricker was 0.20mm so this seems a reasonable value to aim for.

    I had a reel of 0.20 copper wire but was a bit soft and floppy at this gauge so I had a look on eBay and found The Mesh Company was offering 10m of hard drawn Ni200 for £1.99 + £1 p&p (less than the price of a pint so I took a punt). The company also has a website so if you want to have a look or even buy direct the product page is

    Ni200 Wire.jpg http://www.wireandstuff.co.uk/produ...icron---32-AWG----Hard-Finish-199.html#SID=80

    Having got it the stiffness seemed comparable to the genuine Primus pricker wire.

    Next issue was to find a reasonable way to cut it. A pair of decent sidecutters gave a reasonably clean cut but it was a bit chisel shaped at the end.

    sidecutters plan view.jpg
    Plan view

    sidecutters side view.jpg
    Side view

    A squarer end was achieved using a scalpel (#15 blade) with a 2p piece as an anvil.
    scalpel cut plan view.jpg
    Plan view

    scalpel cut side view.jpg
    Side view

    For both methods, drawing the wire back through my fingers felt burr free. Whether the shape of the end is important I am not sure. The Primus original was square cut so I think I will go with this.

    I have a screw clamp type pricker holder so will just cut myself some 3/4"needles (10m of wire should potentially give me a few hundred of these) but if anybody wanted to make some "standard" prickers one advantage of nickel is that it can (with care and a suitable flux) be soldered to either copper or tinplate holders.
     
  17. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,890
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    A very good first post.
    It is also very useful. The 'official' jet size for a 96 is 0.23mm, but I have found that the prickers vary in size.
    0.2mm would seem to be a good size.

    I also have thought about making my own prickers but was worried about the cutting process making a distorted chisel shape.
    Your use of a scalpel is inspired and I think I will give it a try.
     
  18. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    8,527
    Location:
    Far North of Scotland

Share This Page