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Governer The "Lamb" Petrol Stove

Discussion in 'John Shaw & Sons (JS&S)' started by Bom Bom Bom Bom, Apr 2, 2009.

  1. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    Here's my "Lamb" Petrol Stove that I've finally got round to restoring:

    1238662298-P3310052_opt.jpg 1238662310-P3310053_opt.jpg

    I'm not entirely convinced the spirit can is original. I'm also missing the chain that secures the reserve cap to the carrying ring so it doesn't get lost, but this can be replaced with a key chain for a 123 or similar.

    The stove comes with these pieces of metal:

    1238662318-P3310054_opt.jpg

    These slot together to make a surprisingly stable pan rest:

    1238662328-P3310055_opt.jpg

    The jet pricker is original:

    1238662341-P3310056_opt.jpg

    And just to provide an idea of size, here's The "Lamb" alongside a Primus 96:

    1238662348-P3310057_opt.jpg

    In terms of date the JS&S post in the Manufacturers section says JS&S acquired Lamb in 1914 so this stove cannot predate that year. Also in this Ross/Mick Emm post it seems to indicate that this stove came in a tin/post rest version from 1924 onwards. So provisionally I'll date my stove as between 1914 and 1924 unless they continued production of The "Lamb" Petrol Stove without the tin after 1924. Note this is a different model to Kerophile's "bunsen burner" version as I notice that stove has a safety pressure release, and a different shape carrying ring.

    Normally I would be happy to fire up any stove that I have fettled. In this case, whilst I can see no reason why it shouldn't work OK, given that it's petrol/white gas fueled, has no control valve, has no safety pressure release, and relies on lung power to extinguish the flame I don't think I want to risk a potential flare up and thereby lose an interesting, pretty, and relatively rare little stove.
     
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  2. Ian

    Ian United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Whilst caution is no bad thing, I'd say, give it a go, Graham. I run my 70s (effectively the same thing) fairly often and have had no problems at all with them; even under a pot, which really gets them going.
    Keep a wet towel to hand if you don't fancy getting your nose close to it.
    I had a Governor with 4 burner options and that was a little corker too!
     
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  3. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

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    Nice to see one of those as I've only seen the ad before.

    It's not totally clear but the ad could be suggesting this was introduced in 1923:
    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/407

    I'll check later but I don't think I have an earlier references to this set-up.
     
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  4. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    How did I miss that :oops: That'll teach me to scroll all the way down and look at older posts as well!

    Ian, I'll consider your suggestion and weigh up likelyhood of success versus entertainment value for the rest of the forum :lol: I'll do a dunk test in hot water first to see if I've got any obvious points of failure.
     

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