1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Grimwade's 'Quick Cooker'

Discussion in 'Stove Paraffinalia' started by presscall, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,122
    Location:
    UK
    Something for base camp admittedly, but a device to cook puddings more efficiently, the central 'flue' conducting heat to the centre of the pudding.

    The lid is held secure with string and the pot is put into a pan of water, raised to the boil and set to simmer. The pudding cooks in a dry, hot environment in the pot.

    Patented in the Edwardian era, available in the 1920's and in a range of sizes. Mine's the smallest, at 1 pint capacity.

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    John
     
  2. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2012
    Messages:
    958
    Location:
    Caithness, Far North of Scotland.
    Hi John, is this earthenware or enamelled steel?

    Alec.
     
  3. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,581
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Pudding? What kind of pudding? You must mean like a Christmas Pudding, heavy and full of fruit or am I wrong?

    Ben
     
  4. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    7,970
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    Ha! Perfect for Spotted Dick!
     
  5. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,353
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    It looks like a ceramic bowl and a porcelain lid.

    Okay, I can't wait to see the pudding all done up!
     
  6. DAVE GIBSON United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,067
    Location:
    Minneapolis Minnestota USA
    you will never loose the instructions..
     
  7. Jeopardy

    Jeopardy United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Messages:
    999
    Ben,
    Christmas pudding, spotted dick, jam/syrup/treacle sponge or steak and kidney pudding ........ Take your pick. Just don't mix them up and pour custard over the steak and kidney, nor gravy over the plum duff.

    Cooking these would be a good test of a stove's simmer capability because they normally take hours. John's pudding basin will speed things up a bit. But it'll be useless for haircuts though!

    Regards
    John
     
  8. gieorgijewski Poland

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    1,057
    from a long time know
    "boiled cake" form
    [​IMG]
    here - relations - form heigh/water level
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
  9. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    746
    Location:
    Canberra
    We have had one of these since the mid 80s, ours is missing the lid, alyawse wondered what it looked like, now I know. We use ours but with foil as the lid. It makes wonderfull Christmas puddings.
    Cheers
    Rob
    image.jpg
     
  10. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,122
    Location:
    UK
    Tried it out today on a savoury meat pudding, HERE in the Action Gallery.

    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg

    John
     
  11. ArchMc

    ArchMc United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,428
    Location:
    Mojave Desert
    John,
    Great posts and a neat accessory! After reading, I checked the Bay and, to my surprise, was able to find one at a reasonable price. Mine must be slightly newer than yours, as the water fill line has been adjusted a bit.
    DSC00501.JPG DSC00500.JPG

    My wife really took to it, and she and her mother took matters in hand. A quick pastry shell, some leftover filling from last night's stuffed peppers, and we're ready to go.
    DSC00502.JPG DSC00503.JPG

    I fired up the '39 Speedmaster, and we're off.
    DSC00505.JPG DSC00506.JPG

    An hour's simmering, and the finished product was a real treat.
    DSC00508.JPG DSC00509.JPG

    I think next we're going to try putting blackberries in a shell...

    Thanks very much for your inspiring post!

    ....Arch
     
  12. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,122
    Location:
    UK
    @ArchMc
    Well, well, what an excellent outcome!

    Your wife and her Mum have had more sense than I had by not coating the outside of the 'flue' with the pastry. I did and it stuck and messed up turning the pudding out a bit. Clearly not intended to be done that way.

    I like the fact that the pudding pastry doesn't get soggy like a steamed pudding tends to due to condensation.

    Yours has a larger capacity I see - 1 1/2 pints. More to go round.

    Great, thanks for posting.

    John
     
  13. Jim Henderson United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    Riverside, CA
    As an alternative, you might look into Chinese Steam Pots or Yunnan Steam Cooker. This may or may not work...

    http://www.ceramics-in-france.com/en/pagen3.2.html

    They can be found on eBay. I got mine at the local thrift store. I bought mine because it was weird and I thought it was for a different style of cooking.

    To work like your quick cooker, you will most likely need to make a modification or two. You would need to drill a small vent hole in the top of the lid and You probably need to make up some sort of extention for the cone inside. In my thinking a rubber hose slipped over the cone and cut to meet the vent in the lid would do it.

    If you look at the above webpage or do a google search you can find some recipes for this Chinese pot. These recipes may be adaptable to the Quick Cooker. I would guess to get the proper liquid from condensation, you could plug the vent hole with a toothpick. In my opinion too much steam condenses in my pot resulting in a watery broth, so maybe don't plug the vent and see what happens?

    Keep in mind these Chinese pots are unglazed clay, ie porous, and the absence of lead or cadmium or whatever is highly dependent on the maker's concern for food safety or where they got the clay.

    I have made the "chicken soup" per Chinese Recipes and in my opnion it is rather dull with "boiled" chicken and not a robust flavor. From looking for recipes for the Yunnan steamer, it appears there are only a few dishes that are appropriate.

    I suspect that the Yunnan cookers with a "trumpet" shaped cone inside would be more adaptable to the Quick Cooker style of cooking.

    Just some ideas which might be a total flop since I have never tried to use the Yunnan pot like a Quick Cooker.

    So, FWIW,

    Jim Henderson
     
  14. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,122
    Location:
    UK
    @Jim Henderson
    FWIW you say. Your contribution is worth a lot, thanks Jim. Lots of interesting information you've raised there to digest (no foodie pun intended).

    You mention the possibility of toxins leaching from unglazed pottery but I'm aware of the scare associated with lead glazes related to older electric slow cookers.

    How does the Quick Cooker fare in that respect? I'll maybe test it with a lead-detecting swab, but it's in use for an hour's cooking at most and creates an occasional treat.

    John
     
  15. ArchMc

    ArchMc United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,428
    Location:
    Mojave Desert
    @presscall, they were going to coat the flue until I showed them the photo of yours. Great forum, where we can learn from each other! My mother-in-law suggested that for a later meal we could line it with a flour tortilla in lieu of dough. That opens some interesting culinary possibilities. I'm going to have to drag her along on the next stovie camp. ;)

    I'm very interested in the results of your lead-detection test. Though, as you say, I'm sure the problem is small given the usage of the Quick Cooker.

    I've always enjoyed your posts.

    ....Arch
     
  16. larrypotter France

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    France
    Hi,
    That's a wonderful piece of functional industrial ceramics! instructions and adds glazed right onto the pot, brilliant! You might want to get your local potter to make a few instead of messing around with tin foil or whatnot... Though it looks simillar it's an entirely different principle from the Yunnan pot.
     
  17. larrypotter France

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    France
    There is nothing toxic in clay itself. Some decorative low temperature glazes may sometimes contain lead or cadmium but any one working in ceramics knows that these glazes are not to be used for culinary pieces.
     
  18. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,122
    Location:
    UK
    @larrypotter
    You're a wizard, Harry Larrypotter, thanks for that insight.

    With that username and your obvious knowledge of ceramics, I wonder if what you say about the awareness of lead or cadmium in some glazes was true in the industry at the time the Grimwades pot was made, however?

    John
     
  19. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    746
    Location:
    Canberra
    That's an idea larrypotter, I know a potter that could make a top and possibly with the writing on it, then it would be complete.

    Cheers
    Rob
     
  20. larrypotter France

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    France
    If he can put adds for his other items on the inside of the lid, I'll want too see photos :lol:! As for toxic metals oxides in glazes on early twentieth century industrial ceramics there can be some concern as health and safty regulations were pretty much nonexistant in those days, the risk however was mainly for worker in the shops and factories. lead oxide was often used in low temperature glazes (fired around 1000°C. or 1800°F.) as a flux to lower the fusion temperature, but once the glaze has fused the lead is traped in the cristalin structure of the glaze, a type of glass. Very acidic foods could possibly leach the lead out of the glaze but only after long exposure. In any case the Grimwades piece is obviously highfire stoneware or porcelain and highfire glazes do not contain lead. Also the test swabs metioned above are most likely useless simply rubbed on the surface of a glaze! you might try testing vinegar left several days in the pot.... But for the last 50 or 60 years strict health and safety regulations in the US, Europe and many other countries forbid the use of toxic materials in culinary ceramic glazes. I think that will do for the ceramiics lecture today!
     

Share This Page