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How tight is tight, an 8R query

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by alefoot, Jan 7, 2017.

  1. alefoot Canada

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    Exploring and re-furbishing an 8r [bought as a 'needs work' project stove] at present.
    Separating the tank / burner joint required a trip to the bench vice. That joint was very tight. Tight as in, a correctly fitted wrench was rounding-off the hex. Fortunately the threads appear good.
    Now I'm at the re-assembly point. Finger tight finds the burner assembly with the control stem pointing downwards, the 'six o'clock position' when viewed along the axis of the tank/burner joint.

    By the time the control stem reaches the 'seven o'clock' point things are reaching 'hand tight with a small wrench'

    Now I'm no 'man of steel', but the 90 degrees needed to bring the burner round into position feels like it would risk serious damage to the parts.

    Do I back off and use teflon tape a turn earlier? Am I just being a chicken? Do I take the blowtorch to the tank to expand the relevant female threaded part?

    I know it is difficult to quantify these things [the number of search returns for 'taper tightness' demonstrates that!]

    Does anyone have rules of thumb they would like to share?
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Wire brush male and female threads (I'm thinking a small Dremel cup brush at low speed) - whatever's required to remove any scrap of fuel residue gum. Then use a thin smear of non-locking thread sealant which will serve as a lubricant to get the orientation right and the joint good and tight.

    John
     
  3. alefoot Canada

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    Thank you John.
    Do you have a preferred brand or source?
     
  4. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've had this tube of blue Loctite for years. Very thin smear goes a long way.

    IMG_3814.JPG

    John
     
  5. alefoot Canada

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    Marvelous, thank you again! Super-fast expert advice across the time zones. The internet is not all bad :)
    And I'm glad of the picture. I would have ruled that product out since the package describes it as a threadlocker - it's good to know exactly what has worked well for you. Have a good evening.
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    So it does! Well, it 'lets go' for subsequent disassembly when required.

    It probably degrades with the heat the joint is subjected to. A copper-based or graphite lubricant would probably serve as well. It's the tapered threads that make the seal.

    Regards,

    John
     
  7. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hi, Alefoot,

    I think I should mention that Loctite comes in various strengths, and most of us use the BLUE Loctite, as John mentioned. It locks the threads, but can be released with proper use of a wrench. Red Loctite, on the other hand, takes quite a bit of heat, in order to get it to let go. So, DON'T use the red stuff, or green, and stick to blue, as John so rightly suggested. Just a bit of clarification, in case you were wondering....... Good luck, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  8. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    I put mine back together with Permatex 2A sealant, non-hardening, worked like a charm!
     
  9. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I use high temperature copper grease. I can't see the point of locking a thread that isn't going to be subjected to stress, vibration or torque. Unscrews easy peasy if you need to.

    Terry
     

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