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International Fuel Names

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Ian, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    All this slightly off topic talk reminds me of a comment on a cooking show. He was cutting chillies. He reminded everyone to wash their hands before going to the toilet or their wives would kill them later.
     
  2. Matukat United States

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  3. madmaxdoom

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    We call it mineral turpentine over here. Used for paint thinners for base paint and cleaning brushes, very much like kero but clear, derived from pine sap originally.
     
  4. Juan

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    Doron,

    Looking at it and some answers here I realized that for Chile kerosene is parafina, so you should split from Bolivia.
     
  5. orsoorso

    orsoorso Italy Subscriber

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    My first posting, please forgive my English.
    A warning about Italian commercial names for fuels. Actually, with the name "benzina AVIO" they sell, in hardware stores and supermarkets, a mix of esano and dichloroetilene (70/30%) this gives LETHAL vapors if burned in a stove. It is immediately evident by the green color of the flame and the strong chlorine smell.

    Banzina AVIO is sold only for stain removing and SHOULD NOT be used in stoves.

    Unleaded car gasoline is the only Italin choice, as "benzina bianca" (that stands for white gasoline in Italian) is extremely difficult to get.

    Coleman Fuel is readily available at camping equipment shops, but its price is 5 times that of unleaded car gasoline, that in Italian is called benzina verde (that is green gasoline).

    About keroserne, if you call it this way you can get it only in 20 liters jerrycans, but in any hardware store you will get "petrolio bianco" the new name they gave instead of "pertolio lampante" (tax reason) they sell it NOT as a fuel, but as a solvent, but the stuff is the same and burns perfectly clean in kerosene stoves.

    Just in case somebody is planning to trek in Italy.
     
  6. Wim

    Wim Belgium Subscriber

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    Hi orsoorso, welcome to the forum, and thanks for your information :thumbup: ! It can be very helpfull for members camping in your beautifull country.

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  7. snwcmpr United States

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    In this post:
    http://classiccampstoves.com/posts/19455

    There is a link to MSR International fuels.
    http://www.msrcorp.com/stoves/fuels_int.htm

    They have changed their website and under the FAQ:
    http://cascadedesigns.com/MSR/FAQ/Stoves
    There is a list of countries for fuel names.
    Ken in NC
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  8. Bratok_xxl Russian Federation

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    Some update to Russia (ex-USSR)

    ex-USSR (Russia)


    kerosene - (kerosin)


    benzine - (benzin)


    Benzin Galosha - (Nefras S2 80/120)
    Benzin Kalosha


    Methyl Alcohol - (Spirt)

    (metilovy spirt)
     
  9. Bart Netherlands

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    Pardon me for kicking this old thread.

    But I have a note about the Dutch translations.

    Paraffin is translated to Petroleum < correct,
    but they also state Lampen-Olie to be the same.
    This is NOT the same stuff. Lampen-Olie is much thicker and is generally used in wick lamps. It also contains substantially more water (and freezes in winter), and sometimes it has some weird additives to give a (nice) colour.

    There are only a few outdoor camping stores who sell Petroleum in litre bottles.
    Coleman fuel is also available at these stores.
    The 'was benzine' also listed on that side is widely available at any grocery store. It is considered a cleaning agent. It is basically very clean petrol but it lacks the greasing additives it is very lean/thin. But it comes at a quarter of the price of Coleman.

    'Spiritus' (meths) is usually next to the 'wasbenzine' in the stores. It is a mix of ethanol (85%) methanol and water. And it is blue of colour, this due to some poison they added to make it unsuitable for drinking.

    Bart
     
  10. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce Australia Subscriber

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    Here in Australia we now have a fuel called " deodorised kero" ,
    I have used it in stoves and lamps that get used regularly , as it is cheep, on stoves and lamps that don't get lit much I use " lamp oil" as it does not leave a resedue and gum up.
    My question is are they the same product, they both have very little smell before and after burning ?
    Lamp oil is expencive but works well, haven't been game to leave deodorised kero in for fear of gumming up, someone may have the answer to this.

    Cheers
    Rob
     
  11. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    I have seen the deoderised kero at a Bunnings hardware. Says suitable for campstoves. Unfortuanatly I saw the nice blue kero Im used to being the good stuff next to it and half the price. Works ok but they must of used it as a solvent for the sulphur from the deoderised stuff. The cheap blue stuff stinks
     
  12. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Sweden Moderator

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    It's a bit ridiculous to use the word Hjemmebrent under Norway. I'd remove that one.
    That's just meaning illicitly distilled alcohol, e.g. the same as moonshine, hooch, alcool de contrebande or whatever you call it in other countries.
    I'd drop that part from Norway, or otherwise put in the equivalent word for moonshine for every other country too.
    Hembränt for Sweden.
     
  13. Craig

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    Here in Australia, the most commonly used fuel for "petrol" stoves is called Shellite. However, we can also get Coleman fuel, Zippo lighter fluid and something called "White Spirit" which is very close in smell and stove performance to Shellite. I have used all of the above in a Svea 123R without a problem. But I still don't know which one of those fuels is actually "Benzin"/Benzine?
     
  14. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    be careful with white spirit. We used to be the same in NZ but recently the term white spirit has been showing up on another clear liquid that smells more like turps and does not burn. First place to start selling it was Bunnings Right next to it they sell Fuelite and Calcite
     
  15. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Craig

    I would steer clear of "Australian" White Spirit. As you say, it's not Shellite or Coleman Fuel, and has different additives to Shellite, which is essentially additive free.

    Shellite is the same as industrial Recosol R55 (= Shellite X55).

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  16. Craig

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    Thanks guys. I'll standardise on Shellite for the 123Rs and the Borde.

    Cheers!
     

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