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Lamb Petrol Stove - 1930s *

Discussion in 'John Shaw & Sons (JS&S)' started by kerophile, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, Several years ago I was given a gift of a "Lamb" Laboratory Lamp. This apparatus had been used for many years, until after WW 2, in a small rural school in the North of Scotland for the teaching of science subjects.
    The school had no access to utilities, so used paraffin lamps for lighting, coal or peat fires in the class-rooms and a few Lamb stoves for the teaching of science.

    The "Lamb" was manufactured in England by John Shaw & Sons (Wolverhampton) Ltd. and was a petrol-fuelled stove of 0.33 pint capacity, with a brass tank. It was claimed to burn for 1 hour on a full tank.
    Here are some Photos:

    1354923598-P1000155_edited.jpg

    The tank is only 3.25in. ( 83mm) diameter, and the overall height of the stove is about 4.75in. (120mm).

    1354923608-P1000156_edited.jpg

    The stove is well-made and heavily built, weighing about 250g. The tank is of brazed construction and has a soldered wire pressure-release " safety device"

    The stove is advertised as having an indestructible metallic wick, much superior to cotton or similar materials

    1354923616-P1000163_edited.jpg

    Originally the Lamb Laboratory Lamp would have been supplied with a choice of three inter-changeable burner heads; a conventional "96-type" roarer burner, a fish-tail burner, and the Bunsen burner.

    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/212

    Alas, I only possess the Bunsen Head although I know that other CCS members have the full set.

    I believe the Lamb stove was also available in a cased Camping Stove form.
    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/211

    If you look closely at the logo on the tank marking it looks like the centrifugal governor for a Steam Engine. I guess that is where the "Governor" name, widely used on JS&S Co. Products, comes from.


    I am particularly fond of this stove because of the local connections, and the thought of those pupils studying science in challenging circumstances over 70 years ago.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. alnl1996

    alnl1996 Canada Subscriber

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    Very interesting stove kerophile. i wonder if a burner from a 123 would fit :-k


    Take care
     
  3. exeter_yak

    exeter_yak United States Subscriber

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    George, it is a very nice looking lamp and is in very good shape. I think I would prefer the burner head attchment you have over the other available possibilities.

    I notice that compared to various older Pr71 models with similar over pressure relief port devices soldered into the tank, that the Lamb at least has the vent facing the back, away from the operator. I think this burner would look great on display with a pyrex Erlenmeyer flask next to it, and of course would look even better in my collection if you ever become bored with it or run out of space. :lol:

    Thanks for sharing the images.
    Doug
     
  4. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

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    Governor also made a paraffin version of this stove with a tiny pump.
     
  5. Ian

    Ian United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The fishtail burns with a particularly attractive flame. (to my eye, anyway.)
     
  6. Rick b

    Rick b United States Subscriber

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    Very nice Kerophile, a lovely piece! Did you have to do much cleaning?
     
  7. lanevitt United Kingdom

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    Hello George.

    A very good looking stove there. I fully understand what you said about the history/ story behind the stove. I have a stove on the way, a Burmos, that had been in the owners family since before the war. I will post pictures and a copy of an e mail that was sent by the family.
     
  8. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Rick, this small heater/stove (I should have perhaps stated that the measurements on the rule are mm not inches!) was very discoloured and dirty when I acquired it as it had been lying in a plumber's workshop for many tens of years. I used GSR to clean it and then gave it a final polish with Brasso, before I lacquered it.

    Hi Andrew, I get at least twice as much pleasure out of fettling a stove with a story, or some history attached to it, as I do an anonymous acquisition.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  9. Lance United States

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    Ach so that is where the wee part repaired by me was used. Loverly bit of brass that, Geroge.

    lance
     
  10. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, I have recently acquired the roarer burner "head" for this Lamb stove. I am really pleased with it and here are a few photos:

    1339751023-St.104.-Lamb-with-conical-b.jpg 1339751032-St.104.-Lamb-with-conical-2.jpg 1339751043-St.104.-Lamb-with-conical-3.jpg 1339751055-St.104.-Lamb-with-conical-4.jpg



    The stove really is small. Here is a photo alongside an Optimus No.96 stove for scale:

    1339751067-St.104.-Lamb-with-conical-5.jpg

    Best Regards, Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  11. Sparky

    Sparky United States Subscriber

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    A beautiful little stove! How would it have been used as it has no pan supports?
     
  12. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  13. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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  14. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Graham, that is a really neat, well thought-out stand. It is amazing that all the pieces survived, and remained with the stove, when you consider how many "part-stoves" appear on the market!
    Best Regards,
    George.
     
  15. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, I have now had this Lamb stove for over 10 years but have just matched it up with a new old stock (NOS) British Army No.7 stove case.

    They were obviously made to get together. Here are some photos of the Kerophile "Tea Test" carried out yesterday:

    P1010432.jpg P1010432.jpg P1010433.jpg P1010432.jpg P1010433.jpg P1010429.jpg P1010428.jpg P1010419.jpg P1010420.jpg P1010421.jpg P1010422.jpg P1010437.jpg P1010438.jpg P1010434.jpg P1010435.jpg P1010440.jpg

    The set-up works very well.
    The burner to pan base height is correct with this pairing.

    Unfortunately the handle for the stove has to sit at the back of the case for the tank to fit comfortably (the wind-nut filler cap fouls the case if the handle is brought to the front).

    After the kettle had boiled I was able to extract the stove, whilst still burning, from the case , and extinguished it by blowing it out.

    You will see that the case is no longer immaculate as the heat has started to remove the paint.

    I would certainly recommend this arrangement for a Lamb stove if you don't have the original case.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  16. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Kerophile,

    Excellent little stove, and it seems the Brit #7 case if a perfect home for your little Lamb!! At CASG#8. I was gifted one of these neat little stoves, in the #7 case, by Terry, and it ended up being "lost" in a huge box of stoves that I took to that event. I just "found" it again, a few days ago, and am eager to give it a go. Thank you for all the great information you have shared, on these little Lamb stoves, in this excellent thread!!! I've very much enjoyed reading, and learning more about these stoves, and very much appreciate your having gathered together all the info from CCS, and presenting it here.

    I would think that the tiny travel caps are fairly hard to come by "in the wild", but I'd surely like to have one for my little Lamb. From looking at your photos, this seems to be a worthy addition, so that you can safely carry the stove in the #7 tin, without spilling fuel. I'm also considering the addition of a silent cap, if one of the myriad types I have on hand, fits the Lamb. But, if not, no big thing, as the Lamb looks to work just fine with it's roarer burner plate.

    Thanks, again, George, for this excellent report on the Lamb stoves, and some of their associated bits and parts!! Well done, and much appreciated!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     

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