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Landers, Frary and Clark No. 0 alcohol stove

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by presscall, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    This Landers, Frary and Clark alcohol stove has patent numbers and dates on the base and the cast-iron pan ring suggesting an early 20th-century design, but for all I know it could have been manufactured for two or three decades after that, so I'm not at all sure when my stove was made

    1279977717-1.JPG

    Some idea of the size, alongside a Svea 123, my Coleman Speedmaster from 1938 and a couple of Meta pots. The Speedmaster bears an uncanny resemblance in overall 'look' but of course operates on an entirely different principle

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    I stripped the stove down to get some better photographs of details, but the burner and fuel tank are distinctly 'non user-serviceable' and would have to be de-soldered to get them apart, so I didn't!

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    The cast iron pan ring is a beauty. George (Kerophile) recently remarked in my post on a French stove stand ...

    Primus stove range

    ... that French iron castings had an unrivalled delicacy and expertise. I'd judge the American manufacturers of this are to be complimented on having achieved something on a par with the French calibre of work

    1279977755-5.JPG 1279977762-6.jpg 1279977817-7.JPG 1279977835-8.JPG

    The stove is fuelled by alcohol and though there's no control valve such as on a Turm or similar alcohol stove, the flame is regulated, after a fashion, by altering the fuel-air mixture with this adjustable flame tube

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    You can see the fuel jets in there, six of them arranged radially

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    The base of the fuel tank, liberally marked with patent references

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    Priming the stove is done by pumping this little rod up and down three or four times.

    Though as I've said I wasn't keen on de-soldering the components to take a look, I'm guessing that there's no close-fitting piston in a cylinder in there, because the action is quite 'slack', reminiscent of the old-style cast-iron yard pump. It certainly works though

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    I've lit the fuel in the priming trough and allow the heat to generate the main burner flames, then adjust the height of the fuel-air adjusting sleeve to get what I judge is a steady flame

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    There are a few other stoves of this type in the Stove Reference Gallery, and the grand-daddy of the marque, posted by Doc Mark

    Other SRG examples of No.0 stove

    Doc Mark's Landers, Frary and Clark No. 110 stove

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. Stovost

    Stovost United States Subscriber

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    I love your Stove! Was wondering, is the Primer Pump spring loaded? I've the opportunity to obtain one (Internet purchase, not actually seeing and trying it's controls first hand) and the current owner says the Pump isn't spring loaded. Should it be? Thanks!
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Stovost
    It's not spring-loaded. The priming pump 'lifts' fuel and discharges it into the priming channel on the 'up' stroke.

    As you can see from my photograph of the extent of the pump rod raised ...

    IMG_3179.JPG


    ... if that were spring-loaded and permanently raised when not being operated, it wouldn't stow in the 'down' position as neatly as it does.

    IMG_3180.JPG


    A spring's not needed.

    Enjoy your purchase!

    John
     
  4. Stovost

    Stovost United States Subscriber

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    John,



    Thanks so much for the info! I've another question. How much adjustment is there in the Burner height? The Seller says there's very little? Any other things I should be asking the Seller about the Stove?



    Thanks again,

    Steve

    "Stovost"
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Stovost
    Well, here's the full range of adjustment (about an inch) - the outer shroud raised and lowered by the control wheel. I don't know how that relates to the seller's description of 'very little'.

    IMG_3206.JPG

    That said, it's a simple and robust rack and pinion mechanism that a fuel fill to lubricate it should free up if it's sticking.

    Other issues to look out for? Nothing really. The fuel tank is made of nickel-plated brass so you won't be troubled by corrosion pinhole leaks.

    John
     
  6. Stovost

    Stovost United States Subscriber

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    Thanks for all your help, John!!!!!
     

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