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M-1950 stove (made by Coleman in 1952)

Discussion in 'Military' started by Knight84, Sep 27, 2009.

  1. Knight84 Canada

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    Here is my M-1950 stove. Made in 1952 by Coleman. Coleman model 536. The M-1950 was made between 1951 and 1987 by several companies. A few companies made the aluminum canister as well. It has a BTU rating output of 5500 BTU.
    Stamped:
    Coleman
    1952

    1254012882-IMG_1911_opt.jpg
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    I have always thought of the M-1950 as the offspring of the Coleman 530 and M-1942-MOD though its not. It appears to be join effort between the United States Army and Coleman.
    The stove weighs in at 640grams without fuel, spare parts, tool, and canister.
    About 4 grams give or take less than the M-1942-MOD.

    Sorry for the fuzzy picture of the instructions. The later model M-1950 would have two labels. One a warning label and the other instructions. As you can see from the rust it has a steel tank.
    1254013120-IMG_2069_opt.jpg
    The M-1950 reportedly had a special steel that could handle 10 times the normal operating pressure. "Made of copper-brazed rust resistant steel" I believe the tank is brazed together as well.

    Out on day hike.
    1254013145-IMG_2019_opt.jpg

    You can see the trees in the background starting to change colour. It is beautiful time of year in Ontario. (Sept 25) I am sure I will be singing a different tune come winter.
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    The M-1950 is a simple design. It has the standard Coleman fuel tube and generator. It uses a similar cleaning needle and rod as the Coleman 530.
    1254014277-IMG_1846_opt.jpg

    A close up view of the control valve and cleaning mechanism. You can see how it is much like a fly wheel in a car engine. The same lever that controls the cleaning needle/rod controls the flow of fuel. This is why maybe she can't simmer. The army wanted simple and wanted it to boil water. That is what she does well.
    1254014287-IMG_1847_opt.jpg

    From top to bottom. Coleman 520 (1944) M-1950, M-1942-MOD
    1254015683-IMG_1998_opt.jpg

    The M1950 compared to the M-1942-MOD pump. The two pumps have many similarities and can exchange many parts. The M-1950 pump has the added feature of being able to remove the inner pump while the stove is still under pressure or on. :shock: I don't know if this was a design or whatever. It does allow someone to repair the leather pump though and avoid taking the whole pump out.
    1254015855-IMG_2001_opt.jpg
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    As you can see from this picture that the M-1950 has a much longer pump stroke. Note: the strings were removed from both pumps for the picture.
    1254015865-IMG_2005_opt.jpg

    I am not 100% sure why they selected the style of non return valve vs the Coleman check valve design. It does allow for the spare parts tube and easy repairs in the field.

    The M-1950 served the Army for 36 years. And two wars. If it wasn't for the move away from Jeeps and towards using one fuel (JP-8) the stove would have been in use longer I think.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. DavidOR United States

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    Great pictures for which I thank you. Couple of days ago I picked up a 1951 dated Coleman M-1950 and was wondering how the heck I got the pump tube out to check the condition of the leather.

    My container was produced by Rogers of Akron, Ohio so I wonder if they were always paired like this or pieces were switched at some point in past years. I worked military supply way back when so I know how things get cannibalized in efforts to keep an item going.
     
  3. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Kinda wished they had stuck with the positive lock check valve design. A while back I had one go out on me and the stove turned into a fire ball. Luckily I had a fire extinguisher on hand. I really like these stoves, but the maintenance is a little bothersome sometimes. Now I check the NRVs on these EVERYTIME I use them. It reminds me of the Optimus 111B....
     
  4. Knight84 Canada

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    DavidOR,

    From my experience the containers that you have most likely are the original ones. It seems like no one lost the containers but the tool and parts clip seem to be missing from all of them. :roll:

    Ya the NRV on these stoves scares me, and I work with chainsaws and power lines all day. :shock: At least it is easy to check out I guess. ](*,)

    Best regards,
    Jeff
     
  5. DavidOR United States

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    Thanks, Jeff. Makes sense that you'd use the stove and stuff it back into the container.

    Mine actually came with the wrench and the clip has a new valve in it. I looked in the pump tube when I got this stove and the only thing that I took out of the tube was the graphite packing which was in pieces.....The other parts are still in there.

    I get get the pump leather checked after clamping one ring in the aluminum jaws of my Workmate and then using a set of Channellocks on the leather wrapped other ring. The leather was fine. Pliable but dry so it's now getting the 3 in 1 treatment.
     
  6. Knight84 Canada

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    Hello,

    Great news about the wrench. :) That part alone is 10bucks to buy. Some of these stoves I have found came with a spare o-ring and spare leather seal.

    The good news about the leather too. The weak part about this stove is the Non return valve (NRV) Make sure the spring is in good shape and the rubber seal is good if not excellent. You can imagine if that little bit of rubber fails while the stove is on. :shock: :(

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  7. lanevitt United Kingdom

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    I have recently purchased a 1966 Rogers stove. So
    i was soaking up the available information within CCS....(well where else?). I came across Knight84's review. SUPERB info' great pictures and worth while information..Thanks Jeff.
     
  8. RonPH

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    I guess that is the only stove I have that I have not fired up yet :-k . Bought it new :mrgreen:

    Ron
     
  9. Knight84 Canada

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    Your welcome Andrew!

    Gotta love the spare parts tube and clip these stoves come with.

    Lately I have been toying with the Coleman 500/501/501A and 502 stoves.
    I hope to post a similar post on all those stoves soon.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  10. Grizzley

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    Jeff, could you please help me.
    I have a 536 in very good condition. I read these posts and lubricated the leather as suggested. I can't seem to get the thing going right. I think the assembly of the different parts is wrong or something is worn. Here is my problem:
    I pump the recommended 10 pumps and the air seems to leak out the pump tube. I tried pumping more and pressure does not hold. I installed an o-ring over the pump tube to seal the tube cap. Pressure builds up great and got it to work that way. Problem I found is the plunger moves up and also gets filled with gas. I am using Coleman fuel, is that OK?
    What is the order for the parts to go together at the pump?
    I too found the graphite packing that was in the cylinder, busted up. Where does it go??
    Is there a parts breakdown or repair manual available? How about parts?

    Thanks,
    JD
     
  11. RonPH

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    JD, there is a problem with your NRV. Perhaps the PIP is already hard and lets air/fuel back into the pump. There should be spares included in the pump housing for pump gasket, pip, and a graphite washer. The NRV is fairly easy to maintain since the whole pump is removable.

    Ron
     
  12. Knight84 Canada

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    Hi JD

    Like Ron said your problem is the NRV (Non return valve) The seal in the NRV is made out of rubber which with age gets hard and brittle. Therefore air and fuel from the tank is allowed to pass back out though the pump.
    The spare rubbers are no good any more most likely.
    The graphite packing is a spare and goes in the control wheel/valve.
    Use only Coleman fuel.
    The order of the pump and nrv is in one of the pictures above.

    Here is a link to the manual for this stove.

    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/coleman-no-536-m-1950-equivalent.241/

    There are many spare parts available on ebay.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  13. Grizzley

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    Ron, Jeff; Thanks a bunch guys.
    I thought the rubber seal might have been the problem. It seemed quite hard.
    I ordered complete repair kits on Ebay. Seller was in Japan; should take approx 2 weeks to get them.
    I want it in tip top shape for my survival gear for flying into remote areas.
    Thanks for sharing the knowledge,
    JD
     
  14. Knight84 Canada

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    Glad I could help JD.

    I love hearing the stove will have a good purpose. It is a really easy stove to service in the field. Do you have the wrench that these stoves come with? Not needed really as long as you carry a multi tool or leatherman.

    Jeff
     
  15. Tye536

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    What did you use to seal the threads at all of the unions? I used a teflon tape(I believe it was teflon) at the eccentric stem body and the indicator knob. I burned only Coleman fuel, but it seamed as though fuel dissolved tape!!!! Yep, major flamer! Is there a paste sealant that anyone could please recommend? Also does anyone have a spare burner assembly they would like to sell? Thanks Guys.
     
  16. Knight84 Canada

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    Hi Tye536,

    I normally use gas tape on threads. It is not bothered by fuel.
    It should be in the plumbing section of the hardware store or with gas pipes. Normally yellow. There are other thread sealants out there. Graphite lube another one that comes to mind. But generally the tightened down threads should seal just as they are.
    Where is it leaking? At the control knob?

    Jeff
     
  17. Tye536

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    Hi Jeff, Thanks for the reply. Seems as though the leak was generating from possibly bad valve stem packing or sealant tape at valve body/eccentric stem body. At the time I was watching but more worried about flame damage. More than likely the issue was in my using TEFLON tape at this union. Upon disassembly inspection, tape appeared to have just totally dissolved??? :shock: But then Lesson Learned! It was kind of intresting carrying this pressurized cannister around my shop with ft high flames trying to figure out what the hell I'm gonna do with it Ha Ha! :doh:
     
  18. Tye536

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    I really like this little stove. Out of the box fired right up and ran great. Immediately started having all the normal gripes. The only serious issue I have with it was that when it was made, the burner assembly had a really terrible job on the threads and I had a pain unscrewing it first time off. Threads were also crossed. Knowing that this was a fluke and not normal, I'm in the process of buying another burner assembly and I've baught several spare parts for replacement (or on hand). This guy is going into an emergency/survival kit so I'm happy with the education I'm getting here. I also feel as though I'm now a member of a brethern of people who have serious issues for little stoves! :clap:
     
  19. Knight84 Canada

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    You have joined a special little club.

    These stoves are a bit of a pain sometimes and can't simmer. But they are simple and easy to work on in the field. Perfect for a emergency kit or power outage.

    Sorry to hear about your burner problems. Could the burner be rethreaded?
    Welcome to the brethren.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  20. Tye536

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    Hi Jeff, was'nt ablbe to rethread. Not enough material. I believe the original diameter prior to threading was at or over max tol and cross threaded in order to tighten up(?/theory) anyway, baught another (this is Fiesta)at reasonable price from the Evil Site. I'ed love to break that habit! Maybe between the two I'll have one good one. What is your experience with these generators? Somewhere I've read or was told to heat 'em excessively for approx three min with a propane torch, take a pair of pliers and bang it on bench top a couple times and this would help clean it up into useable state :?: . Whats your thought on this proceedure? I'm quizical to say the least. Havent tried it yet, just thought I'ed ask.
     

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