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M-1950 stove (made by Coleman in 1952)

Discussion in 'Military' started by Knight84, Sep 27, 2009.

  1. Lance United States

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    Ken, simmer plates are nothing more than a round disk which sits between the stove and whatever pan or pot you are using at the time. You can make one on the cheap from a canned food lid or buy a special one from ebay. The idea is to seperate the pan or pot from the flame to prevent boilover or to keep the flame from burning your food. I've made them from stainless steel and I've made them from a canned veggies lid. It's really up to you how fancy you want 'em.

    The Military stoves like this are, in my view, the best stove for an emergancy use. As you have learned the screen burns clean, or can be cleaned with soap and a toothbrush. A process which makes them more than useful under all conditions. They have a reputation going back to WW-II when Ernie Pyle stated they are ranked with the M-1 Gruand as one of the best devices to come out of the war for a GI.

    They were designed to burn any fuel which will burn and there are stories of them being used with fine French brandy, as well as diesel fuel, many sorts of vegatable oils, medical alcohol, and even auto gasoline. What's not to like about that. Would I use veggie oil? Perhaps, but all other options will be given up first.

    I can tell you this, regardless of your fuel a hot meal and a helmut of hot water when you are tired, dirty, and in need of sleep goes a long way to improving your morale.

    lance
     
  2. Tye536

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    Hi Lance, just thought you might have a different take on simmer plates than me. Like I said, I didn't know any were issued with this type stove. I could appreciate one boosting morale though, I was Airborne Infantry with the 2nd Bn/504th Inf/82nd Airborne Div. and we weren't able to get nice little stoves like this like the straight legs did, we had to Jump our gear, didn't get our stuff carried around for us either.

    Ken
     
  3. Tye536

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    Decided to take short break fom the stoves. Friend is pushing army two burner on me. The most important thing I've learned about the M-1950...Use It, Take It Apart, Put It Back Together, Get To KNOW It. Then start all over again. I agree with you Lance, I think this probably be the best for emergency situations, but had I not put myself through what I have been through with my two stoves, I dont know that I would have been so fast to throw it in a bug out bag and Trust it to work when I needed it too.

    Believe me, I'm big on trusting gear that you put your life in the hands of.

    Ken
     
  4. Tye536

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    Lance, didn't notice first time around! I'm like totally envious. How far are you from "The" Armory? You know, we were talking about these burner plates, how impossibly difficult can one make it to decide on a material? Believe I'll go with the stainless. Don't know if you're into field gear, I picked up SP8 Machete. What a piece of gear.

    Ken
     
  5. SSgtMike

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    Hey guys. I have one of these M1950 stoves. It's a Rogers 1952. I have multiple fuel nozzles/orifices mounted on unclippable little holders attached to the burner support legs. My question is each for a different type of fuel or just spares?
     
  6. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Only spares.

    Murph
     
  7. SSgtMike

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    Thanks! I stumbled upon a small stash of these and the WW11 style ones in an old man's junk collection. I might try to buy them all. Any idea as to what they're worth? Most are complete or close to complete with the aluminum case.
     
  8. snwcmpr United States

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    Hi Mike, welcome to CCS.
    We don't 'as a rule' give any valuations.
    You can search completed auctions on 'the bay'.
    That would give you some idea, but values change at the whim of the buyer or seller.

    Ken in NC
     
  9. SSgtMike

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    Thanks! I don't want to see these hauled off to the scrap yard and will look on ebay for prices. I believe there are well over a dozen assorted stoves (WW11, Korean, as well as the civilian post-WW11 stoves in the mix.)
     
  10. Bruno QUEYREL France

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    Thnks Jeff, Very useful pictures. I restore a 1942 missing the tiny brass holder in which the caoutchouc fits.
     
  11. Richard Johnston United States

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    m1950Stove1.jpg
    M1950Stove2.jpg
    This is a great thread for these stoves. Here's a pic of my stove that served with me in the Army from 1975-78, used extensively in the hills of Ft. Hood when we were out playing war games in the field. After 40 years the seals had worn out and it did not work - bought a washer kit from OldColemanParts and it now works like new. It needs a little more clean up and I have also found the product and warning labels at this site so I will make it more aesthetically pleasing with new labels.
     
  12. Bruno QUEYREL France

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    New life for my mod 1942, just restored and burning perfect. I just had a problem with NRV brass bottom of the pump, change it for a used one* AAA.JPG , put new leather, and a viton seal.
    a generous veteran sent me that part from California.
     

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