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Meva 2140

Discussion in 'Czech Republic' started by presscall, Sep 20, 2015.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I'd some fettling work to do to get to the point where I could take this Meva on an outing but here it is in the great outdoors

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    I took along a Svea 123 and Juwel 34 for a comparison photo

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    The Meva got the honour of brewing up - silicone kettle

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    Missing from the Meva was the spanner (wrench) control lever extension. The stove has a spindle valve control along the axis of the burner riser and not at right-angles to it (as the Svea or Juwel have). The photo sequence below illustrates

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    I made the control spanner using a piece of steel tubing flattened at one end to fit the end of the control lever on the stove and silbrazed it to a bargain-basket purchase open-ended spanner. A refinement was to cut a jet nipple section shaped hole in its middle to remove and replace a jet

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    Here it is in use

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    Next job to do was to make a flame ring. Here's the burner without it

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    ... and with it

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    I think the component parts were from a kitchen stove flame ring in stainless steel (been in the oddments drawer for years so can't remember where it originated) and I'd to silbraze the flared portion to a flange to fit the burner basket

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    The most noticeable difference in using the stove without the flame ring - which a previous owner obviously had - was the scorching of the top of the windshield where the flame (more flat than with the flame ring in place) impacted on it

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    Flame ring directs the flame away from the windshield and more usefully at the pot base

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    Without flame ring ...

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    ... and with it

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    Simmer control's good

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    Last edited: Sep 20, 2015
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Having that 'proper' spanner/wrench/control as opposed to one stamped out of plate makes it a functional tool for dismantling/reassembly - done here during my walk, just because I could!

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    Some details - the on and off markings on the windshield (in Czech)

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    Good definition to the engraving

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    Number at the centre of the base. It's been suggested in another post on this stove type in the Forum that this signifies a year of manufacture of 1959. Plausible

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    Stove tank is a clip fit in the windshield - not too tight a fit fortunately

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    Fuel cap sealing arrangement, the raised lip ensuring that the nitrile seal isn't squashed out of position when the cap is screwed tight - but hand tight is sufficient, though the spanner's useful to break the seal to undo it

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    I changed the pip (which was rock-hard) in the fuel cap safety release valve.

    Curious thing, the cap seal is an identical size to that for a 3-piece Coleman fuel cap, which I had in stock from this source - "The recollection of quality remains long after the price is forgotten." - well said

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    I could add 'Meva 2140' to that list.

    Fuel cap popped back on the Coleman 500A

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    John
     

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