1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Old roarer burner heads

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by shagratork, Oct 23, 2007.

  1. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,052
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    Hi DocDenzler

    I am pleased you have successfully unblocked your burner.

    I am afraid that I still use this method as I have not got around to making a pressurised air system - so many projects for when I retire!! :shock: :D
     
  2. Big BTU

    Big BTU United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2010
    Messages:
    868
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Thanks for the post Trevor! I just did the heat and quench on my Enders silent burner and it really worked great. I went from having some yellow flame mixed in with the blue to pure blue flame and much more uniform flame too.
     
  3. rafael1633

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Messages:
    51
    For beginners.

    Well, I'm a beginner too, so this words can help others in the same situation.

    If the carbon build up is not that severe, you can first try the "boiling water and ice bath" method, wich I already described. It really works on not so crudded burners.

    Recently I got a real choked burner. Tried acid bath, try boiling and ice... got nothing. Took the courage to heat it up and quench.

    My case was so severe that nothing was coming out with the "little" heat I gave. Then I started to extend the heating till the brass started to changing color, and then quench. Then I saw how powerful this method is: it came out big chips of carbon.

    I think I can say that it's enough heat when the brass starts to change colors. I never took the heat till glow red, actually never got any sign of glow at all, so I believe I stood far from "debraze" temperature.

    After two or three times, the burner head got so dark that I wasn't unable to spot any change of colors (by the way, another acid bath will take this blackness away again).

    But I got an even better sign, which was really interesting: After some three or four minutes of heating, the burner threaded end ignites with a small flame. I can noticed that because this flame is very diferent from the torch flame. Maybe is the coke igniting (but without any source of compressed air at all). I noticed this was another good reference to spot a good heating temperature, hot enough for quench.

    After another three or four times, I noticed that the burner end would not ignite at all, even though I applied the same amount of heat. I assumed that carbon was all gone, and indeed no more carbon came out in the last quench.

    I hope this could help others beginner like me.

    Rafael
     
  4. islandpiper United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    Messages:
    331
    When heating, how hot do you make the burner head? Like normal running temps or hotter? does quenching in cold water induce stress cracking in the metal? thanks, Piper
     
  5. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,052
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    Hi Piper

    For how high a temperature to heat the burner head, I use the 'suck it and see' method :lol:
    In other words I heat it all over for a few minutes with the burner tubes not changing colour.
    If quenching two or three times like this does not work, then I heat the burner tubes more.
    I have heated badly choked burner tubes until they are a soft pink colour.

    Should the tubes be heated as much as this? Theory might dictate that it is harmful to the metal.
    My empirical evidence shows that I have had no future problems with burners I have treated like this.
    In my mind it was either clear the burner tubes out or throw the burner away - so I opted to clear them.

    Of course, whether anyone else uses this method is entirely up to themselves. I am not advising anyone to do it, I am just stating what I do.
     
  6. yonadav

    yonadav Israel Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    2,336
    Location:
    Israel
    One more improvement for the heating process: Once I get the burner sufficiently hot, I blow compressed air through the jet seat (having first removed the jet, of course). This typically results in a big puff of smoke coming out the burner base, that ignites immediately. I keep doing this till I get clean air coming from the other end, reversing blow direction occasionally.

    Yonadav
     
  7. Tunup

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    23
    Excellent post, so those who wish to get a pump I found this.
    On a recent shopping expedition in Castleford, UK, In 'Wilkinson's' AKA 'Wilco' I happened on a stirrup pump for the munificent price of around £9.48
    Here's the link to it
    http://www.wilko.com/bike-accessories/wilko-track-pump-with-gauge-black/invt/0323225

    Tony

    Tony

    I know that I read it on here, but can't find the post, about cleaning out burners so thought this might be useful.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  8. frg7700

    frg7700 United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Messages:
    475
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    Bear with me while I try and describe this idea guys.

    My local "tat shop" has a motoring section and as well as some very useful cleaners/polishes they have cheap Chinese compressors, the kind that run off the lighter socket and are designed to top off tyres or fill airbeds/beach toys. They cost less than £10 and come with a range of adaptors for different sorts of valve.

    I could pick up some brass tube stock from the model shop and crimp & epoxy it to one of the adaptors.

    So I now have a light compressor with a long brass tube attached.

    The problem I foresee with using that is heat transference back along the tube.

    So, I have a scrap computer in the box room, it's a "silent" type, a PC with no fans it prevents itself overheating with massive heatsinks. The one on the CPU looks like the cylinder head from a small motor bike.

    If I pull out that heatsink I could run the brass tube between the fins, bit of silver solder, drop or two of thermal compound and heat should transfer fairly well into the sink. I think it should also be heavy enough to secure the whole arrangement so it can be set on a bench with the burner head placed on top.

    It won't be airtight obviously, but with the jet removed there should still be decent airflow through the burner.

    What say you more mechanically/technically knowledgeable?
     
  9. theyellowdog New Zealand

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,870
    Hi Frg, while I don't fully follow your post I think it should work, I use this and it works well, looks great too...

    1400869182-burner_cleaner_002.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  10. Sparky

    Sparky United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,501
    Location:
    Cypress, Texas
    I have several of those small compressors and while they can achieve tire-popping pressure, the VOLUME OF AIR they move is quite small. It takes 15-20 minutes to inflate a flat tire.
     
  11. Nordicthug United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,968
    Location:
    Mountlake Terrace, in the Puget Sound basin.
    With compressed air moving through the metal tubing I can't see how any heat worth worrying over can move along it. I'd me more concerned about inflating the stove fount than heating up a bit of brass tube.

    A pressure regulator in the line would be a good thing, set to five PSI (.34 BAR) maximum. If anyone knows what the actual safe maximum pressure is for a stove fount, I'd like to know. I don't want to make a "Stove Balloon" to find out.

    Another small thing. Are there any tool shops similar to Harbor Freight or Northern Tool in the UK and Europe? I buy quite a lot of stuff from Harbor Freight. It's cheap stuff, and I like cheap.

    I have an old mid 50's air compressor from Montgomery Ward, a company similar to Sears. I have it set at 65 PSI (4.5 BAR) and a short hose with another regulator in it between the quick disconnect and the blow gun to reduce the pressure even further. With my old compressor, I get enough air volume to do some work. Those little 12v DC ones are better than nothing, but not much. Same with the hand pumps.

    I see air compressors dirt cheap on Craigslist locally, that would be a good place to look. I may just upgrade to a Makita "Twin Sausage Tank" type contractor's compressor. There's one near me for $100 and I have the money. That compressor puts out enough air to run two air nailers at once at 150psi (10.3 BAR) Too much pressure but can be reduced at the compressor head or the outlet from the tank(s).

    Gerry
     
  12. Bart Netherlands

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2010
    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    the Netherlands
    I'm not sure what the maximum is.
    but I had a stove with a pressure gauge, which had a premium working pressure indication at 1,6 kg/cm2 = 1,57 Bar
    and the scale on the gauge went up to 3 kg/cm2 =2,94 Bar
    So I gues you are safe at 0,34 Bar

    Link to topic about stove with pressure gauge

    Bart
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  13. flieger

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Hello all, new guy flieger here.

    Anyone ever tried electrolysis to remove carbon? I use it to strip old cast iron skillets and have been quite pleased with the results.
     
  14. 1966dave

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2014
    Messages:
    449
    I dont think you can use electrolosis on brass though. Steel yes. I seem to think I read that somewhere.


    Dave
     
  15. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,119
    Location:
    Carshalton
    Ultra sonic cleaners are on sale in Lidl at the moment they are only small ones but they are pretty cheap under £20 if I remember correctly.
    Nick
     

Share This Page