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Parasene 1/2 pint silent burner

Discussion in 'Parasene' started by presscall, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've grown fond of this little scorcher in the short time I've had it, a curiosity of a 2-pint stove sized silent burner mounted on a 1/2-pint fuel tank, burner not detachable and with fixed pot supports.

    Alongside it, an equally quirky Veritas 'Superb' lamp

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    I'd some fettling to do to it before I reached this stage - relaxing with a brew at the end of the day

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    Having replaced seals - filler cap; pressure release valve 'pip'; non-return valve 'pip' - and the pump cup washer, a test firing revealed a spurt of flame from a burner tube - the soot from the flare visible here

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    There's the crack

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    Cleaned up for silbrazing - the crack's there all right but not visible in this shot - the metal alongside the crack has been burred over by the abrasive tip

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    Sibrazed repair

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    The test firing also raised suspicions that the jet seat threads were shot - tightening the jet didn't stop a spurt of flame around the jet.

    Old seat machined out ...

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    ... new jet seat silbrazed in place

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    Burner has been boiled in water to dissolve the borax flux. Ready for a clean-up (polishing wheel)

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    Burner cleaned up, ready to go back on the stove

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    The tank filler cap is an externally threaded plug, breaking with convention where the external threads are usually on the tank filler riser

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    Pressure release valve. The 'oversized' burner for the small tank conducts quite a lot of heat to the tank so the pressure release valve is probably a reasonable precaution. That said, it's not a stove I'll be using for hours on end and a five-minute (or less - it's pretty powerful) session to boil water for tea isn't going to result in excess heat/pressure in the tank

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    The pump's a dainty little thing. Still working through my stockpile of Sefaudi's excellent pump cup washers. Like the fuel tank filler cap, the pump cap has external threads too

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    The fuel tank and pot rest legs were painted originally, a residue of the decal remaining which reads 'Entirely British Made'. No mention of the maker anywhere on the stove

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    There's some paint remaining, brass showing through elsewhere. It's a pleasing patina to my eye, so that's how it will remain

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    Patience (and a little effort fettling) brings its own reward

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    I included this shot because it managed to register the fuel vapour stream from the jet nipple in the light from the Veritas Superb

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    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John, excellent documented restoration on the burner.

    The burner on your little parasene really was in a state, you have done a first class job silver soldering the vaporiser tube and the jet seat.

    I remove the borax residue, by soaking it in a hot solution of washing soda/soda crystals, after about half hour it breaks up nice and easy.

    It is very nice to see a veritas superb lantern working perfectly, it is such a shame this model is unreliable, and not a lot of them that work at all.
    To me veritas lantern's especially the superb model looks better in design than most British lanterns, and they look really well made and robust
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Brian. I enjoyed the restoration you completed on your Parasene a while ago. Alas, mine doesn't have the pan ring yours has.

    The two Veritas Superb lamps I have have been no bother. Got themselves a bad reputation in pressure lamp circles for mantle-blackening I know, but mine haven't misbehaved at all. I'm glad of that because as you say they're a handsome design but only of interest to me if usable and the Superbs certainly have been, er, superb. I've a fear of smashing or cracking a globe, which I'd expect to find difficult to replace. So far so good!

    Back to the Parasene stove, it's an oddity sure enough and I haven't really worked out 'why?' - not 'why is it an oddity?' but 'why resort to that combination of small tank/oversized burner?'

    A 'regular' Primus/Optimus/Burmos 96 isn't a poor performer, so the Parasene seems to be indulging in overkill in terms of burner output, but maybe it was the cheapest way for Parasene to make it a silent stove without resorting to making their own equivalent of the smaller, lower output Primus No.4 silent burner to go on it. Perhaps.

    An alternative to finding one of these Parasenes would be to seek out BernieDawg, who does a nice line in riser tubes to graft a silent burner onto a 96 fuel tank. Just needs longer pot legs and it's probably a more practical (read 'back-packable') stove than the Parasene

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    Incidentally, the Parasene is reasonably practical as a stove to take on a hike, as I established HERE

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  4. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John to me the oddity of this stove, is not only the size of the burner mounted on such a small tank, but a collapsible stove especially such a small stove, that was mainly used and designed for hiking motorist, for brewing/boiling in the open air, so a roarer burner would be far suitable, as it is not effected by wind like a silent burner and brings water to the boil quicker.

    But the advantage of a standard silent burner over a lipstick roarer burner, is there is more surface area to vaporise the fuel, if a lipstick burner is pumped a bit to rapid after the priming/preheating stage it can more easily flare.
     
  5. loco7stove

    loco7stove United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John

    Excellent post as usual :D/ :D/ 8) :thumbup: always great to see what you've been fettling 8) :thumbup: & coincidently i have been working on my Veritas Superb lamp this evening too & playing with my new toy a very early 00 , post coming soon :D :thumbup:

    Stu :D :thumbup:
     

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