1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Phoebus 1F steel tank

Discussion in 'Phoebus' started by igh371, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    556
    Location:
    North-East England
    DSC04618.JPG

    Here is a Phoebus 1F stove different to all of the other Phoebus No.1s currently on gallery in that it has relief molded inscriptions and a steel tank. The tank is finished with a, presumably electro-plated, copper coloured surface coating. Marked 'Made in Austria' on the base. The burner is simply marked 'Phoebus' in 3 scripts, Latin, Cyrillic and Arabic.

    DSC04616.JPG DSC04617.JPG DSC04619.JPG DSC04614.JPG DSC04620.JPG

    Discussion on dating might be interesting. The only other steel tanked Phoebus at the moment is from the WW2 period, but that has different form of legs, different pressure release and a military desert paint finish.

    DSC04622.JPG
     
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2004
    Messages:
    8,647
    Location:
    Far North of Scotland
    Hi Ian, @igh371 , interesting stove, perhaps the Phoebus 1F shown in this French language catalogue from 1934:

    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/1934-phoebus-catalogue-french.10706/

    Steel tank, fixed legs, Code name Forre.

    Your stove is marked made in Austria, one of my Phoebus No.1 is marked Made in Germany, which I assumed referred to after the Anschluss in 1938, when Austria became a Province of Greater Germany.

    http://classiccampstoves.com/threads/phoebus-no-1-german-model.4933/

    If your stove was a wartime product I might have expected a similar marking

    The burner, if original, is also helpful, with markings in German, Russian Cyrillic (FEBUS) and either Arabic or Ottoman Turkish, pre-adoption of European alphabet. I think this unlikely to be of WW2 production.wartime.

    OK, how about a mid 1930s production date?

    Best Regards,
    George.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016
  3. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    556
    Location:
    North-East England
    @kerophile Your argument for dating to mid-1930s looks very convincing. The description of the 1F in that French catalogue, 'en fer laitonné', translates as 'in brassed iron' which I think is very much precisely what this is. Maybe the 'F' in the model coding actually derives from 'fer' (although one would then wonder why not 'E' for the German 'Eisen' unless that was not the target market).
     
  4. Radler

    Radler Switzerland Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2013
    Messages:
    226
    Location:
    Bodensee (Switzerland)
    Phoebus stoves are not exactly datable, but there are three periods, which can be fixed: 1. before 1938, 2. between 1938 and 1945 (Made in Germany), 3. between 1945 and 1955 (Made in Austria) Russian occupation. Between 1938 and 1940 some brass stoves were still made, after 1940 kerosene was only available with special permit, and copper/brass had to be replaced by law (wartime economy).

    As kerophile already wrote, the catalogue from 1934 in French is a reference. Most stoves there have a steel version marked with "F". There is a second Catalogue from 1934 but in German, prices given in Austrian Schillings. In this catalogue there are no "F" models. F stands for ferrum the chemical element fe (iron). That means, the steel founts were not sold in Austria and Germany!

    If you go back now to the French catalogue, page 20 and ff, you find many tables how many stoves could be sent in which boxes and their weight. You see the reason, why some stoves are made partly collapsible. The catalogue was made for re-sellers.
    Page 24 is a price list. The most interesting points are: the prices are given in sh/d. Why in British currency in a French catalogue? For Canada? The other point is even more remarkable: the brass and the steel models have the same prices!
    In my eyes steel founts are far less worth than brass ones. Was the "F" edition made for wholesaler who wanted to cheat some people in the colonies? (Buy all the stoves for the same price and sell the brass stoves for a much higher price under the pretext, they are brass?) Or perhaps there were political restrictions in international trade with some metals like copper, after WWI. who knows? Perhaps the CCS members.

    Best Regards
    Radler
     
  5. gieorgijewski Poland

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2013
    Messages:
    1,060

Share This Page