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Sirra gas stove

Discussion in 'Marris Ltd - (Sirram)' started by presscall, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I came across this snippet of information about Marris Ltd and their products in a CCS post from a descendant of the Marris family, it turns out
    Marris potted history

    That reference to the import of Campingaz Bleuet stoves marking the end of the company set me thinking when I acquired this Sirra gas stove, made by Marris

    1278970265-1.JPG

    Now that modern gas canister and flexi hose is my adaptation to fire up the stove, but the illustration on the lid of the stove tin shows the configuration, and that it took its own brand, unique to the stove, of replaceable gas canisters

    1278970273-2.JPG

    Instructions printed on the inside of the lid gave the mode of operation. The canister was the control wheel, so turning the canister half a turn raised the flame to max from simmer

    1278970283-3.JPG

    That lid was a snug fit over the stove

    1278970291-4.JPG 1278970300-5.JPG

    Setting up the stove was a case of unscrewing the valve that fits on the gas canister, sliding the burner out into the operating position, installing the valve on the gas and finally screwing the valve with the canister back into the burner tube. Phew!

    [That's not a Sirra canister installed but an approximation - from a Veritas Chieftain - to give the impression of how the genuine article would look in place]

    1278970376-6.JPG 1278970393-7.JPG 1278970416-9.JPG

    Now an interlude at this point to reflect on the competition, the Campingaz Bleuet, which frankly wasn't such a fuss to fire up and was probably cheaper to buy, with cheaper canisters too

    1278970442-10.JPG 1278970454-11.JPG

    Why Bleuet (Cornflower)?

    Well, here's a cornflower ...

    1278970466-12.JPG

    ... and here's the flame of the Bleuet

    1278970479-13.JPG

    Ok, back to the Sirra. I disassemble the burner for a 'look-see' ...

    1278970501-14.JPG 1278970513-15.JPG 1278970525-16.JPG

    ... and muse on the intricacy of the tin-work of the stove frame. Marris really were expert at this sort of stuff

    1278970537-17.JPG

    Instructions came with the stove, so have a read of those while I upload the final frame of photos, including a test firing

    1278970559-18.JPG 1278970576-19.JPG 1278970589-20.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  2. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

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    Neat little gassie. First saw one on display at Newark a few years back. Got one recently in it's box with paperwork & gas cylinder. I'll add a few pics when I get a mo to scan & photo
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Back to the Sirra. Here's the valve components laid bare. Installed on a charged Sirra gas canister, it enabled the canister to maintain a seal when removed from the burner and stored in the stove case. Complex gadget, obviously reduced the profit margin for the stove, comparing it to the blissfully simple Bleuet. Lovely bit of engineering I'll not deny

    1278972492-21.JPG 1278972505-22.JPG 1278972516-23.JPG 1278972528-24.JPG 1278972541-25.JPG

    Well, with no Sirra gas canister and not a lot of chance of finding one, I was obliged to sit and think for a while, contemplating a stove without fuel, but otherwise raring to go ...

    1278972565-26.JPG

    I had an idea, turning a brass tube in a Dremel, using a file as a cutting tool, an inserting it in a flexi fuel pipe, binding the joint with brass wire to secure it in place. I turned a groove for an 'O' ring seal of a suitable diameter for the stove gas inlet

    1278972587-27.JPG 1278972599-28.JPG 1278972613-29.JPG

    Brewed up on that, let the stove cool down and packed everything away. Well, the canister's an approximation just to illustrate how the Sirra one would pack away

    1278972629-30.JPG

    On balance? Lovely construction, but a dead-end design-wise and costly to produce I'd guess compared to the cheap Bleuet imports.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  4. DAVE GIBSON United States

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    lots of great photos and info,thanks.never seen on this side of the pond and what a heap of metal stampings.couple questions,did Marris make and fill their own gaz carts or hire that out and do you think the Bleuet people said "say,that burner looks like a flower so lets call it-- or "lets make a burner that makes a flower shaped flame"
    possible work for Chickenthief here--
    and i assume this was not seen as a camping stove but a light weight picnic tea boiler.
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Don't know Dave. They had the machinery, experience and skills for working aluminium (that's a Marris aluminium kettle in the title shot) so maybe did the canisters in-house, or sub-contracted that and the filling of them as well...???


    I'd guess the burner design came first and someone was inspired to name it 'Bleuet' after a few test firings. Don't know for sure though.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  6. pianojuggler

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    If I am not mistaken "bleuet" is the French word for "blueberry", which I would think is a more appropriate name for the little blue gas cartridges rather than the stove itself.

    Perhaps it means both "blueberry" and "cornflower".
     
  7. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    I think you are mistaken. French for "blueberry" is "airelle".

    Cheers, Graham.
     
  8. karto

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    Actually you are quite right.
    In regular French, "bleuet" means only "cornflower".
    A blueberry is "myrtille", but in some regional dialects (especially Canadian French) you'll find that blueberries are called "bleuet" or "airelle" indeed (or other things as well...).

    I guess it would have been more difficult to design a blueberry shaped burner ;)
     
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  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good job I wasn't asked to translate 'Le Coq Sportif' then.

    Good excuse to post another couple of pics of the little Cornflower/Blueberry.

    1279050412-Bleuet.JPG 1279050423-Flame.JPG

    I can be extravagant in using the couple of Bleuets I have. Though the gas canisters, long obsolete, are good for only a few cooking/kettle boiling sessions, they're easily refillable using an adaptor to a cheap butane refill donor cartridge.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  10. pianojuggler

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    I live in the U.S., but within spitting distance of Canada (be aware that I would *never* spit on Canada or a Canadian!), so we get many things here, especially produce, that is from Canada, or is labeled for sale in Canada.

    I raised an eyebrow at a fruit stand recently when I saw a basket of blueberries that said "bleuets", and thought, "gee, those look nothing like little stoves", so I naturally assumed that "bleuet" was the French (at least Canadian French) word for "blueberry".


    Nearly completely off topic, "ягоды" (yagodi) is the Russian word for "berries", and "ягодицы" (yagoditzi) is the word for "buttocks". I've always assumed there was some connection there.
     
  11. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, pj is correct about bleuet being a North American blueberry in Canadian French :

    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bleuet

    Meantime I am making enquiries about the Russian buttocks......

    What an interesting place the CCS web-site is.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
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  12. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi pj, I asked my daughter, a Russian/French graduate, about the Russian words. Here is her reply:

    "Where was that from? It's one of several 'cheeky' options, in fact. I like the term 'popka' best.

    Popka doesn't have any other meaning. Neither does 'yagodsty' in fact - you certainly wouldn't use it to describe small berries :)

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  13. Zincman United Kingdom

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    I've just seen this one, what a cracking little set. Sirram were certainly into keeping up with current developments, must go and read the potted history.
     
  14. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Nine months on from acquiring the Sirra stove, I finally tracked down a Sirra gas canister for it, empty but refillable.

    Here it is fitted to the stove

    1302812097-1.JPG

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    The canister has a tip that fits in the brass adaptor and the sprung-loaded hollow needle probe serves to regulate the gas flow and channel the gas from canister to burner

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    Canister refilled from a donor butane gas canister, the stove fired up

    1302812127-3.JPG


    Gas flow is regulated by twisting the canister. The downward tilt of the canister results in the gas reaching the burner head in liquid form, making a flare-up an inevitable consequence until the burner gets hot enough to vapourise the fuel adequately

    1302812142-4.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  15. RonPH

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    Wow! What a flame :thumbup: I guess you have to keep your distance when firing that up.

    Nice one John. Perhaps a new rigging is in the works?

    Ron
     
  16. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    John

    Absolutely wonderful piece of kit.
    Finding the canister is amazing and made the stove fully functional.

    I love it! :D
     
  17. ptr10001 United Kingdom

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    Hi

    have only just joined, and I am sure this is bad form, and apologise if it is, however I notice you were saying you had no gas cylinders for your stove and no chance of finding one.

    Well I have one of these stoves in a box with two gas cylinders, one full and one empty.

    If you would like to PM me I would be happy to explain what I have.

    Thanks. Great resources on this site.

    Note just seen the post in thread with the fact that you have a cylinder.
     

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