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Soutter-style collapsible

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by igh371, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    DSC04724.JPG

    A conundrum wrapped in an enigma or what? A stove seemingly based on 5" shell casing. The only thing comparable would appear to be a stove made by Soutter of Birmingham in 1918. That stove has a makers plate soldered onto it and shares the same form of tank construction wherein the top plate is inserted onto a small shelf machined into the top inside edge of the casing. But this stove has no makers markings soldered on or otherwise and is built around smaller caliber shell casing section. There are lots of very unique little details: the large, slotted, round headed NRV, the soldered fitting to hold the reserve cap when the burner is fitted, the fixed spirit cup built into the riser, the massive filler cap with bespoke pressure release key and the tiny retractable feet. On the other hand the crude addition to the reserve cap, maybe to get better grip, the tent peg legs and the now discarded rubber pump cup appear highly amateurish but may be later add-ons. Like the authenticated Soutter 1918 stove this little collapsible weighs in at an astounding weight for its size: a full 1½lbs!! And now it has been fettled I can also say that the whole assembly gets very hot in use! So what is it? an attempt by Soutter to create a small collapsible companion to their equally extraordinary 2 pinter? or an impressive piece of DIY engineering?

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    And here are the 'before' shots of the burner:
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  2. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Impressive DIY I would suspect the soldering does not have a factory type finish?
    Nick
     
  3. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @nmp I'm very conflicted in my thoughts here Nick. So this is just more thinking aloud. Some of the soldering does have a very poor finish, but that is all at the points where so many stoves have ham-fisted repairs done over the years. Basically there seem to be huge disparities between different elements of this stove. The main tank construction and the non-standard NRV, and the factory quality of all of the threading and taping, feet and riser would all have required professional workshop equipment. It seems very difficult to imagine that a maker who had the skills and equipment to do all of that would have tolerated such poor basic soldering, bent tent peg legs etc. I also wonder whether an 'amateur' would not have been more likely to utilise proprietary or salvage parts for the likes of the caps, pump tube and NRV rather than making their own. If this was 'DIY' it was a one-off from a skilled engineer, but I don't think it could have begun life with the legs, travel cap and soldering in the form and state that they are in now. Probably more baffled than I was when I started, Ian :?::-k
     
  4. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    It is very well made but I am on the fence regarding produced or home engineer..... :-k

    Is the Primus burner hard soldered to the adapter or just screwed (photo from below suggests spirit cup is soldered :-k)
    The pump tube, is it as heavy-gauge as the photo suggests? :shock:
    Additional sawcut in travel cap suggests maybe a change of mind halfway through making it.....?
    Tent-peg supports, well, are they? Or is the most logical method of legs on a parallel-sided stove some round bar with a 90-Deg bend? Devil's Advocate here.... :twisted:

    Also, congratulations on the deft use of a bumpstop :p

    Alec.
     
  5. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I like it factory made or not, If it is DIY a skilled machinist had a hand in it? You say the tank is a shell case maybe a military engineer doing a practicle type of trench art!?

    Nick
     
  6. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @nmp It certainly is a nice little stove and goes very well. I'm tending toward thinking most likely a one-off done by a skilled engineer who had access to a professional machine shop as some sort of private project or maybe even some sort of test piece. There was a time when small machine shops that could have done a job like that were common enough. So not amateur, but not production either? My brain aches. Ian.
     

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