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Taylors 079K boat heater

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by tritonofnor, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. tritonofnor

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    My first attempt to post photos - I hope! With the recent interest in the Victory heaters I thought some of you may be interested to note the differences in the heating method used by Taylors.

    Instead of a reflector, the Taylors uses a steel chimney lined with some sort of mesh which holds and then radiates the heat. The burner is an Optimus 207, as used on my 030 cooker too, and the whole thing is supplied with fuel from a remote bulkhead mounted tank.

    I have removed the preheater cup and use a Tilley type wick to light it. In the burner pic, taken just as the prime had finished, you can just see the mesh starting to glow. After a little while the bottom 3" or so of the chimney will glow red!

    It's not the shiniest heater at the moment, but it's seen a lot of use in the recent cold weather - I'd rather it was keeping me warm! Once (if?) summer arrives I'll get the polish out!

    1232476520-DSC00397_opt.jpg 1232476550-DSC00399_opt.jpg 1232476731-DSC00401_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, I like the Taylors cabin heater. It does seem to be better-engineered than the Victory heater.

    The Taylors heater appears to be based on the principle of using the chimney as a heat-exchanger, and then discharging the combustion gases via a flue, to the outside atmosphere. The mesh lining to the chimney, which you describe, is probably there to help extract maximum heat from the exhaust.

    Reading the instructions for the Victory heater, it appears that a flue is optional, and you are advised that you can run the heater in the cabin, as long as you have adequate ventilation.
    The very attractive housing is really just a bit of decoration, and you could just as well run the Hipolito No.1 stove naked, as long as it was secured to a fixed surface.

    The section in the Victory heater instructions about condensation is disingenuous. You cannot get away from the fact that burning a pint of paraffin will produce about a pint of water as a product of combustion.
    Certainly hot air can carry more water than cold air, but if the combustion gases are not discharged from a cabin or room, you may well have a condensation problem.

    These heaters do look very smart though!

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  3. Stonehopper

    Stonehopper United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I'll concur with that. The Taylors is an established make and well known in marine circles. The Victory is making something of a heater from what is a stove, without even some sort of gauze or dome to create a 'glow'. With pop rivets holding the hinges on, it almost smacks of home-made. Looks all the world as a Seventies/Eighties attempt to tap into a burgeoning live-aboard boat market by copying a well tried article. Seem to remember the Victory being advertised in Waterways World way back.

    Sorry Ross!
     
  4. tritonofnor

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    I really like the look of the Victory - seems to look more in period with my old (73 this year) boat than the Taylors.
    Having said that, the flue is very necessary to avoid condensation even with a wooden hull. Above the Taylors 030 in the galley I have an extractor I made from a high volume computer case fan (12V) feeding through a deck vent. Without it I get heavy condensation on the portlights at this time of year.
    I found by experimentation that an "H Pipe" above the wheelhouse roof provides an excellent "draw" on the Heater.. Not a Taylors accessory, but their flue happens to match up perfectly with 28mm copper water pipe, so I've got stainless flue below deck, and copper above!
     
  5. Stonehopper

    Stonehopper United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Those 'H' pipes are the biz. Very good at cutting out downdraught too. Just about every trawler galley has them - got to be good.
     
  6. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    I'll bite-what the flip is a "H pipe"?

    Might have a need or use for one here.

    Murph
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A "H" pipe is a flue pipe termination, shaped like the letter H but with the flue entering the termination between the bottom uprights, if you who what I mean.
    It is designed to prevent downdraughts, while creating more "suck" of flue gases up the chimney.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  8. christine_b_1967 United States

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