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THERMIDOR 1 PINT PARAFFIN STOVE

Discussion in 'Samuel Heath & Sons' started by kaw550red, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    RM START

    This model was sold under three brand names. RM, Thermidor and Veritas. RM and Thermidor were manufacturers and I suspect that the Veritas stoves were made by RM because they both share the same tank lid. Thermidor always fitted a different tank lid to their stoves.

    For practical purposes it is better to consider the three brands together as the model progressed in parallel through all of the brands.

    Essentially it is a copy of the Primus 210 made between 1935 and 1962 but with two differences. All versions had a plastic pump knob presumably to save brass. All versions have aluminium legs which I believe are unique to this model and a previous Veritas stove although I have seen one stove with steel legs but I think that they were replacements.

    The Thermador version appears to have been the first where all three brands coordinated their designs. The RM instructions may appear inappropriate but I will come back to their significance later. It is possible that the model started after Samuel Heath & Sons bought RM in 1952

    When the sales dropped the firms cut their production costs by dropping the imprinted tanks and dropping the lithographed tins and changing back to plain red tins for all brands however the first of the latest of plain tanked stoves came out in the lithographed tins

    I will now appear to digress but the following comments do have a significance.

    In the middle 1970s (1975?) OPEC decided that the west was wasting oil so decided to restrict production so that their oil would last longer and give their members a steady income over a protracted period rather than making them rich over a short period and then them having no income when the oil ran out. There was no warning that they were going to take that action and no discussions with the west prior to them cutting production. Whilst I cannot remember the year I can remember that it happened in the last week in May of whatever year that it happened. I remember that simply because I was 400 miles from home with my family, dog, car and caravan and only enough petrol to travel about 100 miles. The news also stated that the restricted production was likely to cause shortages. Naturally this produced the predicted shortages because motorists filled their tanks whenever they saw a filling station that had petrol. I did manage to get home but it was very worrying. There followed several months of shortages with filling stations closing when they ran out of petrol then reopening when they got another delivery. Generally motorists were allowed two gallons of fuel if a filling station was open. The government also issued fuel coupons to motorists but petrol rationing was not officially introduced. At the time I had a moped and was going to syphon my car petrol ration out of my car and use it in my moped to stretch my ration.

    A friend was doing that during the shortages as you never knew when you would be able to replace any fuel that you used.

    Now we come to the point of that situation. The instructions are RM instructions but the model progressed in parallel across the three brands so I should think that the same instructions were issued for all brands. The makers had fitted a 0.23 mm nipple to the stove burners instead of the normal 0.32 mm. Apparently they thought that this would save fuel as the smaller nipple only passes half of the fuel that the bigger nipple passes. Whilst this saved fuel per minute it probable wasted more fuel over a cooking period. The amount of heat is governed by the amount of fuel that you can burn. Halving the flow of fuel halved the heat and at least doubled the time that it would take to boil water. When water is being heated there is a substantial loss of heat through the pan sides and top. Increasing the boiling time probably increased the heat lost during boiling so the saving did not occur.

    Whilst this was a silly modification it does serve one purpose. If your stove is fitted with the smaller nipple you know that it must have been made no sooner than 1975.

    This post should be read in conjunction with all other posts about the RM and Veritas 1 pint stoves to get the overall picture of the model

    1260708181-Therm_ass_opt.jpg 1260708239-Therm_trans_opt.jpg 1260708215-Therm_pack_opt.jpg 1260708195-Therm_box_opt.jpg 1260708293-Thermidor_flame_opt.jpg 1260708958-RM_1_pint_insts_opt.jpg


    I am starting to realise why I never put stoves on the website before I sold my collection

    RM SAME

    NEXT


    Regards Bryan
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I have checked several other examples of this model and all have plastic pump knobs. These cover all ages of this model. It is probable that the brass pump knob shown on this stove is a replacement. Sorry if I have misled you

    Regards Bryan
     
  3. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Bryan, I think the use of the 0.23mm aperture jets might have dated to the "First" Oil Shock of 1956, rather than the later 1975 one:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suez_Crisis

    Best Regards,
    George.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  4. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi George

    Sorry I had not seen this comment until now.

    The Suez crisis resulted in petrol rationing but I cannot remember any shortage of paraffin. At the time I was using paraffin stoves and never had any problem getting fuel. Paraffin was also a common fuel for portable heaters in the home. At that time I was also liable to be called up for military service if the situation worsened which I found worrying. The problem was that with the Suez canal closed the oil had to be brought round the horn of Africa which greatly increased its transportation costs. I think that we were still in the austerity years so the rationing restricted ourr consumption which restricted our payments for imported goods

    In the 1970s crisis petrol coupons were issued but never implemented. They were for units of petrol rather than specific quantities. This left the government the option of varying the capacity of a unit to suit the supplies available.

    However the government also realised that the problem was not a short term problem and started to artificially increase the cost of petrol by increased taxation to restrict consumption. I think that the long term effect of the later crisis was what probable sparked the use of the smaller nipple. The instruction for the smaller nipple is rubber stamped on the back of instructions which accompany stoves marked by transfers. In the 1950s paraffin stoves were engraved rather than identified by transfers on their tanks.

    The 1970s crisis was partly resolved because Opec agreed to increase the oil supplies. That agreement may have been reached because our government had implemented the higher taxation on fuels so restricting consumption.

    Regards Bryan
     
  5. Texas

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    Very interesting speculation about the stoves. I've never seen any of the ones described, but am well aware of the gasoline situation back in the mid 70's. I found it interesting at the time that the "shortage" was only in major population centers (where the media coverage was)....there was no shortage out in the hinterlands. At least no long lines and no closed service stations.
    Best,
    Bob
     
  6. kaw550red

    kaw550red United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Bob

    It had not occurred to me until you mentioned it but the 1956 crisis was similar to what you mentioned. I cannot remember seeing any big queues at the filling stations where I lived but Pathe News claimed there were big queues at the London filling station presumably before rationing started. At the time I used to go out in a motor boat that was registered as a fishing boat and I used to go with a petrol coupon and can to buy a gallon of petrol whilst the owner sorted the boat. I cannot remember having to queue but obviously the rationing was in force then.

    I found these videos of the Suez Crisis

    Crisis

    Oil Shortage

    Effects of Oil Shortage

    The situation is fairly easy to summarise

    Britain & France entered into a treaty with Egypt to fund, build and run the Suez canal. I presume that the treaty stated the length of time that Britain & France would own the canal zone after which it would belong to Egypt. King Farouk abdicated and Nasser became President of the new republic. Nasser lusted after the canal revenue so ignored the treaty and nationalised it I think without any financial compensation. Britain & France failed to get a diplomatic solution to the problem so together with Israel invaded Egypt and regained control of the canal zone. However Nasser had ordered the sabotage of the canal by sinking block ships at each end thus trapping ships in transit between the two blockages. I think that he also had the canal mined so that the trapped ships did not dare move. Britain and France were almost universally condemned for the invasion. They also had to clear the canal. I thought that took almost a year but the video suggests that it was months. At some time in 1957 the trapped ships were released and the canal went back into normal use but I have no idea who then owned it.

    The 1970s crisis was justified and was probably a good thing in the long term although it did not feel that way at the time. OPEC said that the west was irresponsible in the way that it using oil. They were not making any efforts to conserve the oil stocks and OPEC would restrict production to safeguard its member state's economic future. They would have a reasonable income over a long period rather than a high income for a short period followed by no income when the oil ran out. At the time car ownership had increased dramatically in the UK so we were using more oil products. If a maker wanted to have a more powerful car he usually increased the engine capacity. Usually that meant a heavier engine which was partly counterproductive. A heavier engine used part of the increased power to move the extra weight but also used more fuel. Whilst the UK government artificially raised the price of petrol by increasing tax on it they also introduced other measures putting pressure on the car designers to produce more efficient engines. Car makers could no longer use car's power or acceleration as selling points in their advertising. The information was still available but not so apparent. The UK government also introduced a standard fuel consumption test and all makers and dealers had to make the results of those tests available to the public so fuel economy became an important selling point if two models were equal in other respects. Car makers in the UK developed engines that were smaller, more economical on fuel and paradoxically more powerful than the older engines. At the same time they also produced cleaner running engines because of environment concerns.

    The quickest way to cause a shortage is to state that there is a possibility of a shortage because everyone goes out and buys all they can of the affected product. People who normally ran cars with little petrol in them went and filled their tanks full and tried to keep them full worsening an already bad situation. One of my work colleagues owned a vintage Bentley as well as his normal car. He went and filled its tank even though he did not use it. It had a very large tank which could be used to fill his modern car many times over. Another work colleague was a bit greedy and very mean. He had seen a garage whose petrol was slightly cheaper than normal so he made a special trip one lunchtime solely to buy petrol from that garage. The costs of the petrol to travel to and from the garage exceeded the saving in petrol cost so he had wasted money and petrol. A London motoring journalist realised that the petrol queues would be smaller in the early hours of the morning because there are less people out of bed. He got out of bed in the middle of the night and went searching for petrol. Whilst his logic was sound his reasoning was not complete. There were few 24 hour filling stations and some of those would be closed for lack of fuel and others would have stopped opening through the night because they could sell all of their petrol during the day without having to pay higher wages to night staff. He spent 2 hours to find fuel and he used more fuel searching for fuel than he was able to buy! Many people were wasting fuel simply by going looking for it rather than buying it when they passed an open filling station

    The petrol queues in the 70s were similar to those shown in the clips or at least were in the areas that I was in.

    Some people think of that period as the good old days. I hope we never return to those days

    Regards Bryan
     
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