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Thompson-Ritchie

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by snwcmpr, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. snwcmpr United States

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    Kettle and meths stove set. This has been on my list for quite some time.
    @presscall posted his similar set here.
    This has a few differences.
    The pot stands are not removable.
    This kit has a windscreen. It sets suspended in an inverted cone resting on the pot stands.
    And unless there is a major problem with my kit, the filler is different. As you can see below, the filler does not appear to have a fitting. The handle spins but does not withdraw. There does not appear to be a thread, and I am afraid it is a 'fix' made by a previous (or last) seller to pass the set off on a buyer. By 'fix' I mean it may have been stuffed into the hole and left that way. That said, I am quite happy with the kit, and the price was fine with me. I will patiently research and see if I can find out more about the stove before I start pulling the handle out and damage something. My hope is that if the joint has failed, then the fitting in inside waiting for a fettler to properly remove it.
    The kettle has had it's fill of hard water, it is quite covered with a thick yellow caking all over the inside. It does not look to have been boiled dry, the solder joints look great. I will try it out soon enough.

    And, this kit is not nearly a pretty as John's kit.

    Ken in NC

    Photos:
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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 17, 2016
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @snwcmpr
    Hi Ken. Of course the difference too as well as that of the pattern of alcohol stove is the form of your kettle and the one I have in that set.

    Your kettle is of the pattern I also have an example of HERE and on which the lid knob was the non-original one on the left (the white ceramic knob on the lid of the kettle in the set is on the right).

    image.jpeg

    What intrigues me is that your kettle has a black knob of the correct form and by chance I chose to fabricate a replacement knob in ebony. I also had to make a fixing bolt of the correct pattern. So, I've learned from yourbexample that the manufacturer made black or white knobs, presumably as an option for the buyer to choose.

    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg

    Tell me, is the knob on the lid of your kettle ceramic?

    John

    PS You'll appreciate the quick-boil qualities. All the complexity and cost of that 'boiler tube' construction really pays of in terms of efficiency.
     
  3. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia Subscriber

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    Ken , very nice .

    kerry
     
  4. snwcmpr United States

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    I took the lid outside into the light and got a close up. The handle is broken and you can see the 'clay' of the ceramic.

    @presscall
    John, I did look at a few kettles and seemed to have forgotten that the kettle with your stove was the different one. Thank you for noting that.

    This kettle has a "3" engraved on the side of the handle.

    Ken in NC
    Thompson-Ritchie 005.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Well, well, black ceramic. Thanks very much for that information @snwcmpr.

    Mine's a 2½ size and measures four inches in height (base to top of one of the 'boiler tubes') and a shade under six-and-a-quarter inches base diameter. Looking at the photos of your kettle and the apparent proportions, I wonder if it's taller and of the same base diameter?

    Heck, Ken, we're in the arcane reaches of vintage kettle lore when we're exploring numbering/sizes long forgotten!

    John
     
  6. snwcmpr United States

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    To the lip I hold 1425 ml of water.
    Also a shade under 6 1/4 inches diameter. (Full base)
    To the top of the boiler tube, mine is 4 3/4 inches.

    3/4 Inch x 6 Inches high is 21.21 cubic inches. (0.73454545 US Pints, 0.61163704 Imperial Pints, 0.34756963 Liter)
    So, two sizes? 2 1/2 & 3. Imperial Pints?

    May I ask a question I have no experience with?
    Do you all, over there, like your kettles? Or is it that you like your tea?
    I mean, I look at the Simplex and this Thompson Ritchie and am amazed at the effort put into a kettle.
    (Remember, I have been wanting one of these a very long time, and am quite glad I got it. I have at least 3 Simplex kettles)

    I am cleaning the inside with citric acid solution and boiling it, letting it set a few minutes then rinsing. It does boil quite fast. Here are 2 photos before. It really looks worse than the photos. I may finish with soap and water with some BBs to Shake, Rattle, & Roll.

    Ken in NC

    Thompson-Ritchie 006.JPG
    Thompson-Ritchie 007.JPG
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @snwcmpr
    I couldn't presume to speak for more than me 'over here' but it's a combination of both in my case.
    When the vintage kettles like the T&R were made the norm was to make tea with leaves and not tea bags. There'd be inherently more process to that and a handsome kettle complemented the process.
    I've said 'process' and I'm loathe to say 'ceremony' to the extent of the Japanese tradition, though the origins of tea drinking in Britain were certainly more formal than in later years, appropriate to a valuable, expensive commodity locked away in tea caddies.

    John
     
  8. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I would use a proprietory kettle descaler rather than citric acid. The best brand over here is Kilrock, but I don't know if that is available in the US. If not, there must be a similar product.

    Terry
     
  9. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Very nice set Ken. The kettle is one to seek after.

    When I saw the title, Thompson-Ritchie, being a computer guy, it reminded me of Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie, both pioneers of computer science, programming, the Unix operating system, and all that. Much of what is being done in programming, the web, servers, computing, phones, almost everything, leads back to these two guys.

    At any rate, you've scored well on the 'computer' kettle. Nice.


    Sam
     
  10. snwcmpr United States

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    I finished with 1 hot water soak, followed by 2 citric acid (dissolved into) hot water soaks. Rinsed and dried, I decided not to rattle the inside.
    Here is a shot of the clean, silvery, inside. Note the 'tinning' is gone in the middle of the bottom.
    (EDIT: I just saw your suggestion about another product, thank you)
    Thompson-Ritchie 008.JPG

    Now, the stove.....
    I keep looking at the handle. I have twisted and pulled, somewhat hard, but the handle does not pull out more than 1/8 inch, and spinning does not seem to have anything it is attached to inside. I am not sure of that though.
    The base feel heavy, but the material it is made of feels thin. It tells me there is more to the inside of this stove than what one can see. It feels like something substantial is inside.

    I cannot find any information about this stove. @presscall referenced the manufacturing in France, so i have looked in that information ans well as Great Britain. As i keep looking, if someone knows more, could you share it here?

    Ken in NC

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    Last edited: Jun 17, 2016
  11. Simes Reserved

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    Tea has been credited with the destruction of home beer brewing. Both processes require the boiling (steralising) water, and in the case of ale the addition of hops helped. As tea drinking became popular, as John says it was quite a lengthy it didn't leave the time for the good lady of the house time to brew beer. Breakfast beer was obviouzly quite low in alcohol content.
     
  12. snwcmpr United States

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    What is the material used to line the inside of these kettles? I wonder what will break off into the water, if I use it to make tea.
    Thanks,
    Ken in NC
     
  13. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Ken,
    I believe that the insides are lined with pure tin. However I have also been told that the construction process necessitated by the elaborate tubular system was for the parts to be pre-tinned before the final assembly soldering, which raises the question of whether all of the lead soldered joints would have had a proper protective tin coating. Would people have been bothered about that when these were made? I guess the only way to be absolutely sure, and to restore the area where the tinning has 'gone', would be first a really thorough chemical cleaning, then after that he only way to re-tin the inside, would be to electro tin it.
    Ian
     
  14. snwcmpr United States

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    That's what I thought.
    Thank you.
     

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