1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Tilley CS56

Discussion in 'Tilley' started by presscall, May 5, 2011.

  1. keeper_of_the_flame France

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Messages:
    142
    John, while I was reflecting on the Tilley the other day I came across this post and like to mention 2 things worth thinking over:

    1.) The Tilley ( and Vapalux ) vapouriser is a white elephant. The way you handle the main problems is good but too much work for a too short time of use till it needs attention again.
    The idea with the parts from old clocks is excellent, but you can have it much easier when you get the bushings ( that are the round metal plates which are pressed into the big walls ) at a clock maker supply store. They sell it by dozens for a few € and you have new not worn 100% round straight holes.

    2.) A couple of years ago when I was fettling the old Tilley lamps I used a complete different way to get vapos for eternal use. Cut off the top piece like you did. The funnel arrangement in the tip - to me - is the reason of coking the vap. So take it off. Insert a tube of brass or copper with an inner diameter of 6 mm and cut a thread of M7 in it. This will fit an ordinary Petromax jet for the 500CP lamp ( this is pricker wire 0.23 ! ). This makes the complete system detachable whenever you want for inside cleaning.

    The pricker wire can be made of a more solid brass wire and you can even use the original Petromax needles on top. If you add brass or V2A gauze around the pricker wire you have a solid guide and a much better heat distribution as well.

    This system can be used for all jets 0.16,0.19, 0.23 aka 250cp, 350cp, 500cp.

    Peter
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,120
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Peter.

    You make some really good points!

    My experience with Tilley lamps, or Vapalux and Bialaddin for that matter, seems to differ from yours in that I've found them to be pretty reliable.

    Maybe the issue is that the older models have had less refined fuels in them than we can get today, leaving some pretty bad residue in some examples that won't respond to 'heat and quench' cycles because the dislodged debris gets trapped in those internal (maybe that should be 'infernal') guide funnels and with a jet orifice permanently installed in one end there's no way to get a cleaning blast of air from a compressor to be thorough enough. Then there's the issue of worn jet orifices of course.

    We've the benefit of a plentiful supply of new (or 'new, old stock') vapourisers to replace the worst examples, so I daresay that masks the problem somewhat, admittedly.

    Regarding your idea for bushings, I need a hole with a wider disc of surrounding metal than a bushing has to keep molten silbraze a manageable distance from the hole/jet orifice during brazing to prevent it flooding the hole.

    I like your idea of an insert for a Tilley/Vapulux/Bialaddin vaporiser to take a Petromax jet and to enable a Petromax pricker needle to be used on a rod operated by the control cock.

    It might not suit the purists is the only objection I can think of, in addition to the perhaps masochistic pleasure some of us get from coaxing a Tilley to life rather than the virtual switching on (as with a light switch almost) of a Petromax, Optimus or Primus.

    John
     
  3. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Messages:
    6,870
    Location:
    Co. Durham, England
    These vapourisers don't require "attention"; they require replacing - every 500 hours or so which was the design life.

    Fit and replace every 500 hours OR spend 500 hours continually farting about with air gaps, paddles, black mantles and such. Yer pays yer money... :D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  4. TP CHEN Taiwan

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    TAIWAN
    Made in Taiwan

    14370111_1362120947135433_7325685380804314900_n.jpg

    14203307_1358264214187773_6272374500306892042_n.jpg

    14264224_1361159713898223_3409161355310915145_n.jpg

    14322729_1362121013802093_525512703434611069_n.jpg
     
  5. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    6,263
    Location:
    USA
  6. TP CHEN Taiwan

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    TAIWAN
    CS56 spare.
    Because in Taiwan often encounter two missing pieces.
     
  7. brassnipplekey

    brassnipplekey United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,341
    Beautifully made in Taiwan
    I appreciate the skill ,time and devotion in machining such items.... & in stainless steel too.
    Thank you ,TP CHEN ,for reviving this old thread.. a delight to re read.
    I know that CHAN in Japaneese is nice/good friend, I hope the same in Taiwaneese
    Cheers TP CHEN CHAN :):):thumbup:

    Kind regards Nick.
     
  8. brassnipplekey

    brassnipplekey United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,341
    @snwcmpr
    I'd guess 316 0r 304 stainless steel.
    They're a lot of work :clap:.

    Nick.
     
  9. TP CHEN Taiwan

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    TAIWAN
    Because there is no mass production.
    So two kits use "CNC Turning" to complete a process.
    Not using traditional stamping.
     
  10. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    6,263
    Location:
    USA
    So, replacement silent caps, for Tilley CS56, made in Taiwan, CNC produced, because those parts are often missing when found.
    Got it.

    Well done.
     

Share This Page