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Townson and Coxson twin burner (petrol) 1953

Discussion in 'Military' started by presscall, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've been on the look-out for one of these for a while.

    A fettler's dream and a manufacturing and sales nightmare I expect for Townson and Coxson.

    A real money pit for T&C, who seem to have gone for the most complicated, the most expensive engineering for something they must have stood no chance of selling in volume to the military and even less in civvy street.

    It still can't sell well and I picked it up cheaply.

    A fettler's dream indeed. The containing box and pot rest frame are out of shot awaiting restoration, but the components here are pretty much done - one burner and control valve detached for stripdown

    1374961510-1.JPG


    Sam won't mind that I borrowed his photo to illustrate how the stove looks complete

    1374962509-1334293400-Townsend_Coxson_001.jpg


    Sam's T&C in Stove Ref Gallery


    The inventory of materials and construction is impressive ... twin brass fuel tanks, linked by tubing so that both tanks are scavenged of fuel, star-shaped (easy grip) aluminium fuel filler cap; bronze control valve spindles; composite control valves comprising brass bodies and steel lipstick burner tubes; locking (closed) pump knob; auto pricking jets on regulated burners; stainless steel disc jets


    A burner and control valve

    1374961526-2.JPG


    1374961533-3.JPG


    When the burner basket is screwed down onto it that stainless steel disc provides the jet orifice

    1374961545-4.JPG


    In switching off the burner the control valve spindle drives a pricker wire through the jet orifice

    1374961561-5.JPG


    To assemble the valve, the spindle has to be screwed into the valve without the pricker nut screwed in place.


    This hexagon socket tool clamped on the stove frame is used to screw the pricker nut on the control valve spindle ...

    1374961597-8.JPG


    1374961583-7.JPG


    That socket tool contains a couple of spare pricker nuts and jet discs

    1374961691-9.JPG


    MORE TO FOLLOW AS THE RESTORATION CONTINUES

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  2. DAVE GIBSON United States

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    How did the disc jet work in practice? They look like the best idea in all that complex machine work.
     
  3. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

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    Why on earth borrow Sams, when yours is complete ?
     
  4. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

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    I've certainly stripped down a stove before & forgot to take a 'before' picture. No big deal?
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Exactly, Ross, you correctly sussed "Why on earth ...?"

    Good grief, Ian.


    Ok, more work on it completed.

    This reamer device comes with the stove

    1375040525-28.JPG


    A plaque on the stove box suggests using it to decoke the burner vapouriser tubes

    1375040536-29.JPG


    The vapouriser tubes were pretty clean, but any carbon would hinder the free movement of the regulator controls, the action of which is to rotate and move up and down in the bore that triangular spacer spacer, which is actually intended as a steadying device to ensure the pricker needle is centred to penetrate the jet orifice in the jet plate.

    Orthodox pricker needles have conical tips to match the interior contours of jets to ensure the needle and jet orifice engage

    1375040515-27.JPG


    Replacing the control spindle packing. The existing stuff was some fibrous material (asbestos in there certainly). Though I wasn't queasy about the asbestos as such it wasn't such efficient packing, porous to petrol judging by the smell of it

    1375040551-30.JPG

    1375040563-31.JPG


    Terry (Trojandog) markets some great packing material. Thin sheet, a strip of which is cut to width and wrapped round the spindle. When the packing nut is screwed down it crushes into place and makes a perfect seal

    1375040578-32.JPG 1375040588-33.JPG 1375040610-34.JPG 1375040629-35.JPG


    Pump seals replaced. Non-return valve is Tilley pattern

    1375040648-37.JPG


    Goes well, heat shield in place as a precaution

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    Dave Gibson asked,

    Works well Dave. No less control or a worse flame pattern than with a conventional jet. Pretty good.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I spruced up the stove case a bit as the final job and reunited the fuel tank and burners unit with it, setting a proper squaddie-sized kettle to boil on it and swapping one of the roarer burner plates with an old favourite - a BernieDawg TD cap intended originally to convert a British Army No.12 to silent burning mode

    1375138669-1.JPG 1375138676-2.JPG 1375138830-4.JPG 1375138705-3.JPG 1375138841-5.JPG 1375138854-6.JPG 1375138873-7.JPG 1375138887-8.JPG 1375138899-9.JPG 1375138910-10.JPG 1375138927-11.JPG 1375138948-12.JPG 1375138964-13.JPG 1375138981-14.JPG 1375138995-15.JPG 1375139013-16.JPG 1375139036-17.JPG 1375139054-18.JPG 1375139174-19.JPG 1375139196-20.JPG

    A FEW MORE PICS TO FOLLOW

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Simmering to full blast on the TD cap then some night shots illuminated by - appropriately enough - an ex-Army Vapalux

    1375139779-21.JPG 1375139790-22.JPG 1375139801-23.JPG 1375139812-24.JPG 1375139828-25.JPG 1375139840-26.JPG


    My conclusions about the stove at this end of the fettle?

    In part, as I'd already judged - an expensive flop commercially with needlessly complex burners.

    That said, the burner control valves are immensely robust and with the 60-year-old packing seals replaced with a better modern equivalent, the burners work really well and are surely capable of shrugging off another 60 years of use, no bother.

    Those jet discs are a great idea and the durability of stainless steel suggests they'll stay on spec in terms of unworn jet orifices, better than brass jet nipples.

    Shut-off of the fuel is positive and certain, unlike those military No.2 (and No.3) stoves with the roarer burners and the ridiculously long control spindles and the burners regulate smoothly from off through simmering to full power.

    The heat shield barrier between burners and fuel tanks is effective (metal on top, woven asbestos-based material on the flip side) and the fuel capacity offered by the two tanks is impressive in such a compact package.

    I'll be using it often, providing I'm trucking it to a picnic spot and not backpacking.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  8. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Excellent post John. And, no, I don't mind at all to being associated with your work. Thank you very much. It's an honor.

    You've turned an otherwise poor stove into quite a nice working unit. I will be able to fettle mine based on your brilliant work.

    sam
     
  9. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner United Kingdom Admin Subscriber

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    I agree. For this stove, a real diversion from the norm, it not only helps identify the make & model but shows the guts as well. Thanks John.
     
  10. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia Subscriber

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    G,,day John . somehow I had missed seeing this write up . as others have said impressive indeed.
    I like it regardless of or because of its complexity .
    top job on the work you did to it :thumbup:
    but as I now know having seen other examples , I should expect it :)
    cheers
    kerry
     

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