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Unusual kettle

Discussion in 'Stove Paraffinalia' started by Trojandog, Apr 20, 2017 at 10:01 AM.

  1. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Picked up this kettle for £3.00 at a car boot sale on Saturday. The seller said it was used by his grandfather when he used to run a pair of working narrow boats on the Kennet & Avon canal.

    20170420_1538.JPG

    20170420_1539.JPG

    Sitting on a 2 pint patent Phöbus stove that I picked up the next day:

    20170420_1549.JPG

    The kettle has a odd, extended, spout/filler:

    20170420_1541.JPG

    And running from the kettle through the handle is a vent pipe:

    20170420_1546.JPG

    The kettle has a thick flat base suggesting it was for use on a range or similar. Considering the work involved in producing a kettle like this, I was surprised that it carries no maker's name or other marking. It weighs 1.04kg (2.29 lbs) and holds 2.38 litres.

    Given the seller's comment regarding his grandfather's use of the kettle on the canals, I can only conclude that the tall spout was to prevent spillage and that the vent pipe was to relieve pressure if the spout was blocked by slopping water and to provide a smooth flow when pouring (which it does).

    I won't be polishing it as it has a lovely mahogany patina.

    Terry
     
  2. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    Terry that is a good find.
    I certainly have not seen anything like it. It is a very innovative design.
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    They certainly pushed the boat out with that design.

    Very plausible reason you offer for the break from usual design Terry. No concerns about getting scalded by steam from a loose fitting or vented (a hole) lid, or losing the lid for that matter.

    John
     
  4. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @Trojandog

    Terry

    That is a fine kettle! It's good to know something about its history as well.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  5. Rickybob United Kingdom

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    probably a silly question, but is the tube from the top centre a whatchacallit - like a whistle?
     
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi @Trojandog . I do like your kettle. Unique, or at least I have never seen one like it before.
    Best Regards,
    Keropile.
     
  7. Rickybob United Kingdom

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    i have looked at the pictures again and i think you have an early form of whistling kettle, the shape of the spout suggests a cork was used to form a seal forcing steam to escape through the tube, easy to test it stuff a cloth in the spout and boil up
     
  8. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Rickybob

    I can see your reasoning and just tried it - no whistle, it's just a vent pipe. :-k

    Terry
     
  9. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi @Trojandog I reckon the small pipe acts both a vent pipe to release steam, and a breather pipe when pouring water from the kettle. If you don't have a breather you can get glugging or an air-lock.
    Just Saying,
    Beet Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  10. Rickybob United Kingdom

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    it remains a mystery! and a compelling one at that - just the thing to get the brain going on a sleepy sunday morning
    my only other guess is that it might be something a chemist might use, maybe to boil up cough syrup perhaps
     
  11. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States Subscriber

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    I'm in love with your kettle. It would be just the thing to use with Sea Swing gimbled stove outfit. My only concern is that that the copper handle might get too hot to touch without a pot holder. Perhaps the handle was originally cane covered like this one:

    tea pot.jpg
    Ben
     
  12. Trojandog

    Trojandog United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @z1ulike

    Yes it does get hot, I had to use a cloth. So either cane wrapped or asbestos hands.
     
  13. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    @Trojandog ,

    Hey, Terry,

    WOW!! You and John alway find the most interesting kettles, and I love that you both share them here!! We love the little copper kettle that you gifted us at CASG #8, and have it on display in our living room! Next to it, we have the little ceramic/polymer clay bear that Lin made, on it's cross-stitch mat. And, you will see the little Governor Lamb stove, in the Brit #7 case, that you also gifted me at #8! Lovely and appreciated gifts, all!! We've used the little kettle quite often, and it's taking on a patina of it's own, just as it should. I have yet to try my hand at cane-wrapping the brass handle of the kettle, even though John's outstanding tutorial on same should get me there, IF I could get started on it!!

    Terry's kettle and Lamb.JPG
    In any case, your new find of this unique and most certainly interesting kettle of yours, is truly a wonderful find!! Good on you for scoring it, and many thanks for sharing it here!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     

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