1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Wear-Ever camping pans (and an enamelled tin mug)

Discussion in 'Stove Paraffinalia' started by presscall, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Pans come in a twill cotton tailored bag, equipped with press-stud fasteners

    1391549531-1.JPG


    1391549539-2.JPG 1391550165-3.JPG 1391550175-4.JPG 1391550186-5.JPG 1391550197-6.JPG



    The steel handle of the frying pan pivots and disengages from a metal lug on the pan to enable the set to be unshipped

    1391550214-7.JPG


    1391550231-8.JPG


    1391550243-9.JPG


    The mug is an addition, I'm supposing

    1391550254-10.JPG


    I've seen flimsier tow-bars for automobiles than that handle

    1391550268-11.JPG


    Handle's stamped to the effect that a patent has been applied for

    1391550278-12.JPG


    The base stamp. Made in the USA, model no. 888

    1391550288-13.JPG


    That coach bolt pivot with a wing nut is functional and there are 'pips' and hollows punched in the mating parts of the handle to ensure positive locking in place (stowed as here or opened up for use) when the wing nut is tightened up

    1391550325-16.JPG


    1391550299-14.JPG


    1391550310-15.JPG


    I wonder though whether the pivot was always that coach bolt and wing nut, or perhaps just a rivet that loosened up too much and was discarded. The replacement isn't an easy fit in the pocket in the bag

    1391550345-17.JPG


    Diameter of the frying pan and this pan is around seven inches

    1391550383-18.JPG


    This one's 'Manufactured in Canada' and is (I think) model no. 168. Stamp is a bit faint

    1391550405-19.JPG


    1391550442-20.JPG


    More to follow
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    This pan with a lid is deeper and has a diameter of about five-and-a-half inches

    1391551562-21.JPG


    1391551574-22.JPG


    Also manufactured in Canada, it's model no. 234

    1391551584-23.JPG


    Now to the mug - I say 'mug' but maybe I'm the mug and it's a jug because it's got a pouring lip. I'm hoping a CCS member (possibly Stateside) will be able to identify it as a known military issue item. Certainly it's olive drab ...

    1391551594-24.JPG


    Those two, stacked, indentations on the mug aren't accidental dents. They have a purpose I'm thinking

    1391551604-25.JPG


    It's a lovely thing. The patina of the bare steel exposed by the the enamel chips has taken quite a while to get like that

    1391551621-26.JPG


    A clue on the base. I'm kicking myself for not recognising it and can't even decide which is the right way up to decipher it, but feel sure that someone will make sense of it!

    1391551635-27.JPG


    This way up? ...

    1391551647-28.JPG


    ... or this?

    1391551658-29.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Just noticed reviewing my post, the USA pan has the TACUCo stamp and the Canadian ones have NACo.

    Research called for. Equivalent of Canadian and USA Coleman offshoots I suppose.

    John
     
  4. itchy United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Messages:
    2,821
    Location:
    Durham, North Carolina
    John,
    Never seen one that vintage, but all the similar sets I have seen have the wing nut.
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    That's interesting Itchy, many thanks. I'll stitch up that corner of the bag and call it good on that evidence.

    I've taken another look online for whatever I can find about the Wear-Ever brand. Can't see the wood for the trees. Broad outline of company history, loads of Wear-Ever goods for sale, mostly new. I've not yet found a collectors' website, which was what I was hoping for. Maybe there isn't one.

    John
     
  6. Chef BC United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2010
    Messages:
    1,630
    John you always seem to find the most tantalizing pieces. :D/ What a super looking kit. I carried one similar in my Scouting days but it was far less durable looking. The "plow share" handle looks to be zinc coated. With all the different manufacturer stamps, could we figure it to be a mish-mashed together set? That mug does look to be an extra special purpose intended item but do the indentations measure out any specific quantity of product? Might be time to get a history search on the USA and Canadian Wear Ever manufacturing facilities. Still this is a nice find. :clap:
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Thanks Harold.

    Yes, intriguing bit of kit sure enough. It's surely been someone's favourite set for a good while and now I'm custodian for a spell.

    It'll certainly continue to be used, probably very soon in conjuction with my 1917 Primus 96 for a spot of retro camp cooking.

    I spotted somewhere in my Googling that the Marines latched onto Wear-Ever cook ware at an early date.

    John
     
  8. Nordicthug United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,968
    Location:
    Mountlake Terrace, in the Puget Sound basin.
    The general shape of the kit is Boy Scouts of America. There are dozens of copies made all over the world. I never liked that set as I have never used a frying pan when hiking and the pot is too small to be practical. All the kits of that style I've ever seen have had a plastic cup.

    The mug you show seems to me to be a combination measuring cup/drinking mug with hte dents signifying amout of liquid, I'd measur them into an actual measuring cut. The mug is not US Military. The logo is unfamiliar. The US military branches used identical gear as far as I know. And the only mug issued was the canteen cup. Anything unique to the Marines would be stamped USMC. That kit is all civilian save possible the mug, it mught be lower Elbonian issue. I thought it might be South African but is missing the broad arrow mark found on all commonwealth military kit.

    US mess kits are oval shaped since at least WWI. The lower is sort of frying pan shaped and the upper is stamped into two sections with a deep trough to allow the handle to fall between and snap closed. Early (WWI) kit can be alumin(i)um but later WWI and all WWII and later is stainless steel and was issued with a knife, fork and spoon all marked USA. The handles were marked with Date and manufacturer.

    Take all above cum grano salis, my data set is archaic.

    Gerry
     
  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Your 'pinch of salt' contribution is just fine, Gerry. Much appreciated.

    John
     
  10. DAVE GIBSON United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2004
    Messages:
    4,080
    Location:
    Minneapolis Minnestota USA
    Great find of a old and well used kit. If you invert the pan over the pot will the fry pan handle still swing over and close up the way all of these cook kits do?
    The cup is a measure made to pour a liquid. Whoever had the kit must of replaced the smaller cup that came with the kit. I have never seen anything like it but the cutlass has a navy look? Rum measure? Looks like a 16 under the cutlass, 16 ounces?
    Stuff like this is fun to pick.
    BINGO!! I just ran a Goggle search of "navy rum measure cup" and used the image search and there is a page of them like that in some way. Age is the only question now.
     
  11. alanwenker

    alanwenker United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,009
    Location:
    St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
    Typically the Boy Scout sets had a plastic cup, but older versions had an aluminum drinking cup. I've seen photos of vintage sets with the aluminum cup, but these must have gone away during the 1960's. About half way down this page is an example of the older style. Your set appears to have much heavier gauge metal than most.
    http://www.jaysknives.com/boyscoutknives_5.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  12. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,719
    Location:
    Illinois, the Land of lincoln
    John thx for sharing, I'm +1 w/Dave being very interested esp re the mug. I had searched and searched again w/Dave quiry and haved NOT found any oval bottom (enamelware / graniteware) measure / mug. (can i get a link possibly dave?)
    Rum measure / Mugs that popped were mostly British by the way.

    I'll NOW thank the UK for Boy Scouts of America cuz I understand BSA was established copying Boy Scouts in UK. So it may be with this mess kit.
    Although no doubt the oval-shape mug fits nicely in a mess kit, i wonder were they originally together in a kit?
    And as for "like a boy scout kit", like Boy Scouts UK quite possibly which those of us stateside wouldn't typically find these UK boy scout items.
     
  13. ulysses

    ulysses United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,142
    Location:
    Manasquan, New Jersey USA
    John:

    As Gerry and Alan have mentioned, your kit is an earlier version of the standard North American "Scout" type cook kit. The steel handle and some of the other refinements indicate an earlier date. So does the color of the carrying bag and it's details. I've never seen one with the flaps that open to allow the withdrawl of the kit. My guess that this is of 1950s production. Kits like this were produced from the late 1940s (?), to the 1980s, at least. They are probably still in production in China. The were produced for the Boy and Girl Scouts, and are marked on the handle with a logo. I have a complete Girl Scout kit with a plaid cover. Wear-Ever was a quality manufacturer. My first one, from the 50s, was made by Palco, who also made canteens. The earlier ones had a rounded aluminum cup with a flat handle. They did have a wing nut to clamp the handle. I've heated many a can of beans or stew in the little pot, and even cooked bacon, etc. in the fry pan. It did tend to burn things in the thin aluminum pan.

    In the mid-50s to the mid-60s, we always cooked on a fire. There were essentially no stoves in any of the local sporting goods shops, or in the Scout catalog, and we just never knew they existed. By the late 1960s I had discovered REI, and ordered A Seva 123, and two Sigg Pots. All are still in front line service today.

    The cup could be a Royal Navy measure, but there should be a crows foot somewhere on it. The only similar cup I've seen are part of a Swiss army set that included a small oval flask (10 ounces?)that fit inside the cup (reason for the detents; hold the flask in?). The set was available from Sportsman's Guide here in the US, a few years ago. Earlier models (1930s and 40s?) had a metal flask with a cork stopper, later models had a plastic flask with a screw top.

    Paul
     
  14. alanwenker

    alanwenker United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,009
    Location:
    St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
    There were also cheap copies sold as well without the Boy and Girl Scout logos. My first kit from the 1970's was a cheap knock off, the official BSA versions at the time were of better quality than mine, but did cost a few more dollars. Back in the day some of the official BSA kit was quite nice; quality knives, decent leather pouches, etc.
     
  15. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    You're an amazing lot, you really are. Loads of info to sift through. Brilliant.

    Dave Gibson asked,

    I get what you mean Dave. Just tried it and yes, it will.

    John
     
  16. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,136
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    I Googled 'National Council Mess Kit images' and got a screen full of wonderful images - some similar to your kit, John.
     
  17. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Yep, got those Trevor. Outstanding.

    A load of sleuths, that's what you are.

    Not marked as a Boy Scout's mess kit as some evidently are and combining Canadian-made Wear-Ever utensils with that frying pan made in the USA.

    Enamelled steel cup/measure with the crossed cutlasses markings found its way in there at some point, the oval cross-section lending itself to stowing away inside the billy.

    If I can work out the difference in Imperial and American fluid ounces I'll see if those markings on the cup correspond to a set figure in either and it might offer a clue as to which side of the Atlantic the cup originated. Maybe.

    John
     
  18. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,719
    Location:
    Illinois, the Land of lincoln
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  19. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,436
    Location:
    UK
    Thank you OMC.

    I understand your reasoning, that the ebay item you identified - Wear-Ever frying pan model no.888 with a 1915 patent date stamped on the handle - must be of a later date than the one I have carrying the stamp 'Patent Applied For'.

    I'm sure you're right that the cup's been added to the set and wasn't originally packaged with it.

    Concerning that marking of the crossed swords, Dave Gibson offered a compelling argument that the cup/measure could be a rum measure and reinforced the navy connection by referring to the swords in the logo as cutlasses.

    On studying the logo more I'm inclined to think that the swords are of an Eastern scimitar pattern rather than cutlass, which doesn't signify anything about the country of origin of manufacture of course and nor does it dilute the rum measure argument.

    John
     
  20. Giri

    Giri Canada Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    149
    Location:
    Canada
    Last edited: May 27, 2016

Share This Page