1892-96 Primus

Discussion in 'Primus Early Models (un-numbered)' started by Christer Carlsson, May 6, 2011.

  1. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    3,539
    Stamped with the Hjorth name at the bottom, hence from 1892 or later.
    Also made before the little stylized stove was inserted into the text PRI-MUS after 1896. The removable pump tube with its old style NRV also indicates this year to be the last probable one of manufacture. This tube, however, has a hex nut for its removal instead of the slimmer solution you can see on the other 19:th centuries Primuses with this NRV, and its removable pump tube.

    This is of course also before any model numbers were assigned to the stoves.

    1304708778-P1.jpg

    1304708778-P1.jpg 1304708785-P1_b.jpg 1304708793-p2.jpg 1304708801-p3.jpg 1304708808-p4.jpg 1304708815-p5.jpg 1304708823-p6.jpg 1304708831-p7.jpg 1304708837-p8.jpg

    It has the same feature as all the old Primus stoves, like the text on the pump- and tank lid, no text on the air release screw, the old-style legs with sharply curved pot rests and no "feet" at the bottoms etc.
    One funny thing worth noticing is that they stamped the tank lid wrong!
    The 'N' in 'Patent' is mirrored, as you can see in the fourth thumbnail!
    That's a bit odd, because you can't get a stamped letter wrong so easily. Perhaps they accidentally mixed a cyrillic type into the stamping tool? The export to Russia started as early as 1893, so it's a possibility...

    The burner is most likely the original, or atleast one of the earliest.
    It doesn't have the hex nut to help you to fit it to the stove as the later ones has.
    The flame spreader was missing, so I had to put a later one there instead. Fascinating that they kept the same size and shape for more than a century, so that you still could use quite recent spare part on a late 19:th centuy stove... That goes for more than that particular thing. Many things on the absolute oldest Primuses were still directly exchangeable with some parts as long as the domestic stoves were produced.
    Now, ain't that a winning design?! :thumbup:
     
  2. yonadav

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    2,346
    Location:
    Israel
    What a beautiful gem!

    Yonadav
     
  3. mr optimus

    mr optimus Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,229
    Hi Christer a real gem of a stove i like the unusual NRV i wonder how reliable it is too the standard type and how easy it is to service.
    Also the cast iron pan suport realy gives it a touch of class compared to the modern pressed steel type
     
  4. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    4,499
    Location:
    Dendermonde, Belgium
    A thing of beauty is a joy forever! What more can I say? Good to know this lovely old lady found a loving & caring home.

    All the best,

    Wim
     
  5. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    3,539
    Thanks guys! It truly is a wonderful old piece of history, and atleast as I see it; it has come to a good home.
    Mind you! I am not responsible for the high gloss!
    I would have prefered a good, darkened but well cleaned patina.
    Unfortunately the former owner, or someone before, found it to be a good idea to clean the stove off with steel wool :(
    When I got it, I couldn't do other than buff the worst scores of.

    Mr Optimus - I have four stoves with this older NRV, and surprisingly enough I must say that they work very well, despite their very early appearence in the stove evolution.
    Most of them have worked flawlessly without any efforts at all, which is more than you can say with stoves that use the later, more familiar kind of NRV.
    The piece that seals is made out of natural cork, and as far as I can tell, they are all the original ones, or atleast very old. But they still keep the pressure inside the tank now as I pump the pressure up after... Oh, well, I don't know how many decades since the last time!
    I guess it all comes down to production costs. The later kind must mean a more concentrated manufacturing of differnt parts, an easier assembly of the whole stove, and perhaps also an easier maintenance - when well needed - by the owner of the apparatus.
     
  6. mr optimus

    mr optimus Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    2,229
    yes christer a real shame they took of the original patina even though i do shine my stoves i would never do it too one of that age as a good clean patina realy suits the antique stoves of that age.
    A lot of people have cleaned these stoves with the wrong method and realy scratched the tank badly i must admit i do use steel wool on tanks from time to time with no problems but with only ultra fine grade and nothing else any other grade would scratch a tank i have read on here a previous owner had taken a wire brush to a stove tank
     
  7. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,374
    Oooh, Ahhh! Wow! Nice, very nice. I like it when those old stoves say, 'Patent'! Makes it sure that it is very early.

    The way they made the pump and NRV should have never gone away. It's a bit more complicated to make but being able to remove the pump and service the NRV would be such as nice feature on many stoves, which seems to be forgotten through out the middle years and then has returned in more modern styles, at least with the bottle style camp stoves. I have a blow torch/lamp that has a similar NRV.

    Thanks for the very nice photos,
    sam
     
  8. Gordon F

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    Messages:
    397
    An absolute beauty Christar,I wonder how many of todays products will last 100 years, and still be functional.

    I'm guessing we all know the answer to that one !

    Are there any other things that never changed any major detail over such a long period ?
     
  9. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    3,539
    Yep. I'm with you there.
    I have absolutely nothing against highly polished stoves. Brass is a fantastic material, and it's easy to keep in a good and shiny look.

    You could say that I'm a bit divided here. I really like the bit of bling bling that brass can give.
    But when I get a really old piece with it's old darkened patina... well that's really gets me going even more! :lol:

    Considering how unusually deep and good the engravings actually still is on this old Primus considering it's age, and especially after the former owners rough treatment, I can't but ponder how it would have looked just before the last "refurbishment", probably made just before the sale...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  10. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    3,539
    Sam, I agree with you in everything!

    Well, I'm far from an expert on this, but I think that most things were kept for almost a decade.
    Like the threads. I think you can take any air release screw from most later stoves and exchange with a 19:th century one.
    That actually goes for anythings with a thread, if I'm correct: the burner to the tank, the pump cap and pump knob, and also the jet to the burner!
    And then we also have the over all design! Not much has happened there.
    That's a winning concept from the start for you. :lol:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  11. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,699
    Location:
    Lancashire, United Kingdom
    Very enjoyable feature, Christer, thank you.

    Yes, pity about the lack of restraint of the previous owner in polishing (let alone wire brushing) the stove. I guess they'd see nothing wrong in sandblasting Stonehenge to make it look like new.

    Absolute delight, nevertheless.

    John
     
  12. threedots New Zealand

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    793
    Hello Christer.
    Another very interesting stove and artical.
    Is there any chance of seeing flame shots from this oldie?
    As far as the polished brass look goes, not all stoves look attractive in the old patina that they have aquired over time. Some even look positively ugly untill they get cleaned up and polished.
    They seem to run better cleaned up as well. Cheers
     
  13. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

    Online
    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
    18,085
    Evening, Christer,

    Outstanding old Primus, my Friend!! Well done in presenting it to all of us here at CCS, too. I have a question, if I may? Big Jim Henderson, very kindly gifted me a Novy Formaldehyde Generator, which was used to sterilize rooms, and dates to around 1889, or so, and it has the very same type of "removable" NRV setup as does your wonderful early Primus.

    That setup seems stuck, fast, and so far, I've not been able to remove the "removable" NRV setup! ](*,) :doh: :( I've tried heating the large nut, and using a large wrench, but all to no avail. How easily did your NRV assembly come off? Did you use heat? A large wrench? What's your secret, Christer, of did it just unscrew as intended, with no muss or fuss?

    Thanks for any thoughts you can send my way on this. Hopefully, whatever you experienced will help me get my own such NRV removed for servicing.

    Again, you have scored a very nice old stove, and thanks, very much, for sharing it with us. Thanks, also, for any info you can send on removing the NRV assembly. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  14. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    3,539
    First of all, thanks for your kind words everyone.

    I will try to make it happen. I just have to make a better seal for the pump tube. I think they used plumbing flax before, and I have seen it been used for tjis in other removable pump tubes. I might go with that again.

    Mark, they have all been stuck pretty hard for me, these pumps.
    But this one atleast had a hex nut to get a good grip.
    First of all, I used a good box-end wrench for the nut. When I felt that it was stuck really hard, I thought that I'd better take it easy.
    I don't know if it helped, but I heated the tank very gently around the pump fitting with a heat gun. They are not to be underestimated! They do easily melt the solder if you're not careful.
    When the tank was as warm as I dared, I quickly sprayed the pump tube and it's nut with cool spray (if that's the correct word?).
    After that I tried again. I still needed a lot of force, so I actually don't know if the heat and cool thing helped, but atleast I did something. And it came loose without destroying something else. :lol:
    However, the cool spray has often helped me in similar situations. It can get a smaller item down to some 50-60 degrees below freezing, and metal contracts quite a bit then.

    Hope you'll manage to get your pump out. Good thing that you don't rush it. Always better to take it calm and easy, and try different ways.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  15. threedots New Zealand

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    793
    Hello Doc.
    I suspect that old kerosene residue that has time hardened withen the stove or around any threads(acting like a glue), can sometimes cause NRV's or threaded pump tubes to be alot harder to remove.
    I say this because I use methylated spirits to desolve old kerosene and crud from withen old stove fuel tanks. I have found previously hard to remove NRV's alot easier to remove after using that process.
    The alcohol disolves the old kerosene. It takes time though - about a week. Possibly a solution to your problem. Cheers, John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  16. Javerjayal

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2016
    Messages:
    150
    very beautiful heater Shalom