1926 Primus No.702

Discussion in 'Primus No:702' started by Admin, Mar 13, 2011.

  1. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

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    This beauty arrived yesterday.

    First picture, the condition that is was received, courtesy of the seller.

    The vapouriser tubes were completely blocked up, combination of methods to clean it up were used.
    First of all took the nipple out, heated the burner, left to cool, rodded the tubes with a bit of old sil braising wire, and the debris shown.
    Used an old syringe to put WD40 down the tubes, turn the tank upside down, fixed the burner, pressurised, left for half an hour to let the WD40 to soak through. Rodded again, cleared out some more crap, did a suck and blow, mouth full of water ;)
    Final clean was done in a solution of boiling Citric acid and washing powder.

    First clean of the tank involved, hot water, sprinkle of washing powder over the tank, with a wire pan scourer.
    Second clean, saucepan full of cold water, and a combination of Citric acid/Washing powder, scoured the same as first clean, rotated tank around saucapan, until all is done.
    Polished it with Autosol, washed all the residue off.
    The filler cap, is an Optimus that came with the stove.
    It has had a repair done to the pump tube, and there was a large dent to the bottom rim, which has been pulled out and straightened,


    1300025735-IMG_1427_opt.jpg

    1300025687-KGrHqYOKo0E0fjsyVbEBNRt3GOU_12_opt.jpg 1300025706-IMG_1412-1_opt.jpg 1300025757-IMG_1413-1_opt.jpg 1300025774-IMG_1428_opt.jpg 1300025798-IMG_1429_opt.jpg 1300025816-IMG_1426_opt.jpg 1300025840-IMG_1454_opt.jpg
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    It's a personal thing and I'd hate to be thought of as out of order Ian, but my personal preference is to clean the crud off the ancients without cutting back to brass.

    These two Sieverts show the sort of finish I like to retain.


    Sievert patina


    If I acquire a stove already lacking the patina and where the lacquer's only partially intact, from a sixties stove typically, I'd probably strip the lacquer and get the brass gleaming for sure. Nice to have the contrast in a collection of 'obviously' old that look their age and something newer that's almost factory fresh, or indeed actually is factory fresh if it's never been used.

    Don't know what anyone else thinks, but once again, apologies for soapboxing!

    Lovely job you made of the cleaning though and my compliments on the work you put in to getting the Primus running so well. I love those old Optimus tank filler caps with the coxcomb grip.

    Best wishes,

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  3. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Morning, Ian, Presscall, and All,

    Very nice old stove, Ian, and well done on your successful fettle of it! :clap: :clap: I think it looks lovely, after your fluff and buff, but I fully understand John's point about actually preserving the original patina, after the chunks have been "knocked off". I, too, have some gleaming examples of stoves I've polished, but I also take great delight in just using them as found, after only a tiny bit of a wipe down. They have earned their stripes, me thinks, and there is something very special, in my eyes, about an old stove roaring away, looking just as it should look, after years of faithful service. Not all of them need a face-lift, IMHO. But, your stove does look marvelous, in any case, and it's a real pleasure to see it roaring away, in full voice!!! Again, well done, Sir!! :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  4. mr optimus

    mr optimus Subscriber

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    hi iani a very nice job there and what seems a efective way of decoking the burner looking what has come out if memory serves me right i am sure the 702 stove was the stove that was used in a plumbers furnace called the london furnace by primus.
     
  5. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Beautiful restoration!

    Is this the original flame ring (tube) or a replacement?

    You can try to remove solder from the pump with a steel wire brush.

    You got enough fire-power with this one and the Bladon to cook soup for a party of 100 :D/

    Yonadav
     
  6. hikin_jim

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    Fabulous job. The "after" photos look so nice it's hard to believe that the stove in the first photo is even related let alone the same stove. It's good to see her working again.

    HJ
     
  7. Admin

    Admin Courtesy of Iani

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    Hi John
    As you say cleaning is a persoanl preference. Although the pictures done show it, this was plastered in Bitumen. I am more than happy with the cleaning of it.

    Hi Yonadav
    The tube I have used is a cast iron tube, borrowed from another stove. I am leaving the pump alone, as it is a bit hit and miss working on those.

    Hi Graham
    I have a couple of these London Furnace stands, if memory serves me correctly, one is early and the other is a later version.
     
  8. RoyJB

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    Hi, I have acquired a 702 with the same blocked burner problem. I am a bit restricted in my efforts to try and unblock it as I do not have a jet spanner that fits so that I can remove the jet. My "universal" one is slightly too small. Can you identify which spanner I need so I can buy one.

    Also, whilst writing, the burner is missing its flame tube and the tube support. Any ideas to source them?

    regards
     
  9. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  10. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Hi @RoyJB , a good alternative is a piece of exhaust pipe of correct (or close) diameter. On my Sievert I've used a piece of steel tubing (as it is thicker, it takes more time to warm up. Don't use a galvanized one, zinc fumes can kill!).

    Bien à vous,

    Wim