1930 (circa) Primus 70/71 L, nickeled

Discussion in 'Primus No:70' started by SMolson, Aug 11, 2014.

  1. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    An early 1930 regulated nickeled Primus 70 L. This version was likely the pre-cursor to the first version of the Primus 71, which appeared in the 1931. So I date this 70 (71) to c1930/31.

    This version shares the following with the 71 models: soldered pin on the fount (emergency venting), dimpled fuel tank for spirit well (no separate/raised spirit dish), soldered mound on bottom of fount, regulated burner with key/chain, burner bell design, etc.

    Shares these features with the 70: fount stamping: No. 70.

    Unique features: fuel cap labeling (hybrid between both versions)

    Shown here with silent damper.
    1407724173-IMG_7685_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Stove was used, as was the case, but in fair condition.
    1407724186-IMG_7569_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Steel linked chain connected by hooks around key and regulating stem.
    1407724204-IMG_7565_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Soldered venting pin located between fount stamping NAPTHA and PETROL
    1407724259-IMG_7555_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    On the side TRADE MARK PRI-MUS with stove logo
    1407724280-IMG_7559_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Opposite side: PRIMUS No 70 MADE IN SWEDEN
    1407724287-IMG_7560_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Depression around vaporiser tube for spirit well.
    1407724301-IMG_7571_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Fount stamping: BENZINE and BENZOLINE
    1407724308-IMG_7573_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Underside, no date stamp, soldering mound.
    1407724315-IMG_7574_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Burner bell with shortened neck. 4 thin slits and 4 round holes like those in early 71 models.
    1407724341-IMG_7562_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Fount cap stamping: PRIMUS SWEDEN (no surrounding oval).
    1407724348-IMG_7557_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Notched regulating key/tool
    1407724356-IMG_7556_opt.jpg

    Tin is later model for the 70's.
    1407724373-IMG_7582_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    1407724380-IMG_7584_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Looks like someone closed this either when the stove was operating or just turned off.
    1407724388-IMG_7585_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    Two parallel steel waffled pot supports. Roarer designation.
    1407724400-IMG_7577_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    With silent camp No 4200, steel. Silent cap also fits 71's, 96 and 97 stoves (among other models).
    1407724408-IMG_7689_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    All she needed to operate safely was a new fuel cap gasket. Original wick appeared fine, uncharred in the fuel tank. Original cork dried out and no longer held pressure, replaced with one cut from viton, 1/16th".
    1/2 filled tank with coleman fuel, primed with methyl hydrate and lit.
    1407724421-IMG_2574_Primus_70_opt.jpg

    With the silent damper
    1407724434-IMG_2551_Primus_70_opt.jpg

    Medium output.
    1407724442-IMG_2548_Primus_70_opt.jpg

    I'm not a big fan of the standard Primus 70 models - they have small fuel tanks, unregulated, wasteful on fuel, can be a challenge to extinguish, can't pack away until completely cool and more dangerous to operate. This 70 is pretty much identical to the first 71 models, a vast improvement over their predecessor due to the regulated burner. Their colorful attractive tins however, both the 70's and the early 71 models, are much too flimsy, among other drawbacks, imo for anything but car camping or use in the backyard. However, when coupled with the larger E kit (rounded aluminum draughtshield/pot support/nesting kit), they offer a much improved and flexible combination worthy of more demanding activities.

    These late model regulated 70's, like the early 71's, imo show a number of drawbacks versus later model 71's. Later 71's had larger fuel capacity (reducing fill-ups and extending cooking times) and longer regulating key (preventing burns, safer operation). Still, this hybrid is an interesting link in the progression/history of the model line of 70/71 stoves and still a great performer when coupled with an E kit.
     
  2. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    An excellent example!
    Lovely.

    Alec.
     
  3. Big BTU

    Big BTU Subscriber

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    A beauty of a stove. You are a lucky man to find so many rare treasures in your neck of the woods.

    Thank you for the pictures!
     
  4. Lighthouse

    Lighthouse Sweden Subscriber

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    Great write-up on an excellent stove model. A true classic!

    Regarding the date, I agree with early 30's. Not only can it be viewed in the catalogue you linked to, Ross also made an interesting post in this thread. https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/19707

    A selection is quoted below.

    The safety pin was introduced to the 70 in 1931 & the same year the control-cock version was replaced with an identical spec No:71. The non-control No:70 remained alongside the 71 for a short while.

    That style tin was in service until 1937.


    A very nice post for the reference gallery, showing details that can determine age (pressure release pin) and condition. (paint loss etc.)

    Thanks very much! Oh - and welcome back!

    Frank
     
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  5. mr optimus

    mr optimus Subscriber

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    Hi SMolson superb example and brilliant documented post.
    I adore these nickel plated stove's, especially if the plaiting is in good condition.
     
  6. snwcmpr

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    Beautiful!!!
     
  7. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    HI, SMolson,

    Thank you for sharing this lovely stove with us! Well presented, and an excellent example of this type of stove, which, by the way, I've never seen before! Well done, and thanks, again! God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  8. munchh

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    That nickle plating is a bit special.
     
  9. Hazet

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    Awesome stove SM. Looks really great! LOVE the nickel plating.
     
  10. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    Thanks for the kind comments everyone, and Frank good Link. So this version had a very short run of 1 year? 1930-1931? Also, the one in the Link has a key similar to that from certain classes of Radius 42 stoves (flared out end). Perhaps its original was lost and the Radius version used as a replacement (or they used the same key style).

    Another attribute I noticed on this 70 is her burner plate is thicker (2x) and heavier (16 grams) than the standard size (of 8 grams).

    1407813952-IMG_7563_Primus_70_reg_opt.jpg

    It has the standard markings of a Primus plate though (1 straight indentation along each supporting bracket).

    Whether it came from another model (non-Primus) I don't know, but all my other 71 and 70 burner plates are of the same size/weight. Checking against various year classes of Svea 123, Radius 42, Optimus 80's, 99, 8, etc and similar Juwel models there were no matches.
     
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  11. Lighthouse

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    Hi SMolson,

    According to this image, taken from the 1930 Primus - Con catalogue here, the flared out key and your key were both available at the same time (1930-1931).
    I don't know if you could choose these yourself or if Primus added these.

    Here is the picture from the 1930 Primus Con Catalogue.

    1407866872-1225573545-1930-Primus-Con-P21.jpg

    Frank
     
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  12. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    Hi Frank,

    I'm referring to this type of key seen with the Radius 42. I have a few of these types with the flared ends (with slight differences), but all have come with Radius 42's. I can't tell 100% from the image you posted if that key has the flared ends, but it doesn't look like it.
     
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  13. idahostoveguy

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    Superb stove and tin. The nickel is just perfect.



    sam
     
  14. Lighthouse

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    Hi SMolson,

    I actually meant the key that belongs to the stove with the frying pan on top. It is barely visible. I should have explained that in my previous post. I have just posted a new topic of my latest find, a mid-1930's Primus 71. It has the key that I was referring to in my previous posts. It has no markings on it whatsoever, so it is highly unlikely it belonged to a Radius 42. This only confirms my theory that there were 2 keys available at the same time. Your key for this stove and mine - both can be seen in the last photo I posted.
    My stove can be seen at this link: https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/27916

    Frank
     
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  15. SMolson

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    Update on the key with flared out edges. I have seen a number of examples of this key with the early Primus 71 types so I now believe these were common enough and original to the stoves. Both Radius and Primus used this type.