1935 Willis boat equipment catalogue,stove page.

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by nmp, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I was a little uncertain where to post this as it’s not necessarily country specific.it might actually be 1930 edition sorry for the mistake in the title.

    It may be of interest to some of you!

    1E473DB0-7D38-430F-8261-DADD9EFD54E2.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
  2. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    @nmp , Morning, Nick,

    That's a great catalog page, showing some interesting versions of several of our old favorites!! I love seeing such things, in old catalogs, as you have shared, and always grin at the "low" prices thereof!! Of course, when you look back to those days, those seemingly small prices were not so "small" after all!! Thanks, very much, for sharing this fun info, Mate!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  3. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    The old prices were, indeed, relative.

    Here in the US, around the time you turn 65 or so, the Social Security Administration starts sending annual statements showing the wages you earned over your working life. It was sobering to consider how things changed just in my adult lifetime.

    These showed that in the years 1967-70 I made around $3,000 per year. I was working full time on the swing shift, going to college, and had a wife and two children. My wife was not working. I was able to support a family on that income, in Seattle.

    When we moved to Salem, Or. in 1970-73, while I was in law school, we lived on $310 per month; $100 of which was rent for a (very small) two-bedroom house (had three kids by then).
    Back then Salem, as an agricultural town, had a very low cost of living, even given the standards of the time. Bread would often go on sale at ten cents per loaf, milk at 25 cents per gallon, etc. Of course, back then, gasoline was 25 cents per gallon.

    Even though we lived it, and I remember it well, it seems remote in time, indeed....

    There were a few guys there who liked to play poker. I sat down a couple of times. I had to come back and tell my wife I'd lost 5 bucks-- cured me of gambling before I got started. Five bucks was sometimes as big as a blanket back then, especially toward the end of the month.
     
  4. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Ed Winskill great way of bringing the changes into context.
    I used to be able to go out and have five pints for a pound in 1976 now it’s 1 pint for £5 some places! Glad I gave up 20 odd years ago!
    Nick.
     
  5. shueilung.2008

    shueilung.2008 Subscriber

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  6. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Right, Nick-- a small schooner of beer here (12 fl.oz.) back then was 25 cents.

    Now a (16 oz.) pint is five or six bucks.

    When I was 20 and went to the grocery store with my wife and new child, I'd buy a 12-quart bottle case of beer for $4; i.e. 3 English gallons of beer. (I say with wife and kid because drinking age was 21; nobody asked my age in those circumstances!)
     
  7. Fettler United States

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    Those stoves and cookgear were fairly expensive items, though it may not look like it today in terms of the nominal numbers. A new car was maybe $600 or $700 - and it should be pointed out the national economy was completely collapsed in 1930, true unemployment was north of 25%.

    It is difficult to make accurate price comparisons over long time periods, adjust for monetary inflation, currency revaluations and the rest of it. But it has always seemed to me that textiles - clothing and the like, and machine tools, in particular were very expensive items relative to income compared to food or rent.

    I do remember older relatives telling us about the 1930s era "A candy bar was only a nickel, but nobody had a nickel." It was bad. So $4.75 for the 2 burner campstove was maybe a bridge too far, or the $6 Juwel. Nobody hardly wanted to camp if they could help it, at one level, because it reminds people of being homeless.
     
  8. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    My parents, and my friends' parents, who all grew up during the Depression, were enthusiastic campers. Indeed, it was from them that I learned to love camping myself.
     
  9. Fettler United States

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    I don't doubt it Ed, but it isn't universal by any means. One Uncle of mine, a WWII veteran, took his family all over America to the National Parks. He was tighter than bark on a tree though, he wanted to save money. In those days it was almost free. Another WWII vet looked at me with something approaching contempt when I brought it up.

    "Camping" he practically spit it out. "I did all the camping I'll ever want to do in New Guinea in 1942"
     
  10. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @shueilung.2008 ha ha ha!
    Great reminiscences guys we all tend to look back at how cheap stuff appears in the old days by comparing to todays wages and costs it’s easy to forget that wages were tiny compared to today’s !
     
  11. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    The 'Mars Bar' reference is always useful in this context. Just one of a few financial indicators in this article.

    Economics in the real world