1938 Primus #71, with Nickel-plated font.

Discussion in 'Primus No:71' started by Doc Mark, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, All,

    Many years ago, around the mid-1980's, I found a very nice Primus #71, with a nickel-plated
    font. The date code is AC, which makes it a 1938 model. The safety release had, and still has, some problems, in that someone cranked down on the protruding wire, and now, when you fire the stove up, there is a candle flame at the tip of the safety wire!! What in heck....?!!?!

    I'll add the photos, and you can see the stove, and it's goodies.

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    Here, you can see how someone cranked down in the protruding safety release, deforming it, and rending it incapable of totally sealing, when the stove is running. Looks to me as if someone tried to re-solder the release, and mucked it all up. What say you, Lads and Lassies?

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    This model of the 71 has an air adjustment. The setting in this shot is for using Petrol, or Coleman Fuel, and other Naptha type fuels.

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    From what I have read, shifted to this setting, the air is supposed to be adjusted for heavier fuels, like Diesel, though I don't have any idea how this stove could run on such a noxious and heavy fuel!

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    I think this 71 is a real beauty, and would like to get the safety release fixed, so that it will function as designed, and not leak fuel.

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    I think this shot is very cool!! Not only can you see the "AC" date code, but with the great condition of the nickel-plating, you can see reflections of the trees, and even himself! ;) :lol:

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    The fuel cap is stamped "5", though I have no idea what that might mean. Part number? Any thoughts, Folks?

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    And, the inside attachment for the fuel cap gasket, is unique. I changed the gasket back when I first bought the stove, but after all these years, it's fairly hard again, and I'll need to do it again. Between the fuel gasket need to be replaced, and the safety release compromised, I did not feel safe firing it up, hence, no flame shot.

    I dearly love the quality of these old stoves!! Thanks for giving it a peek, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  2. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    That is a pretty stove my friend.
     
  3. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

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    Hiya Doc Mark,

    I have a P71 1938 unused too, although not with the nickel plated fount. My P71 came with the original instructions. The burner adjustment was to allow the use of "Discol" fuel, which I believe was a petrol/ethanol blend 90/10.

    We are in COVID 19 lockdown here in New Zealand, so I hope you and family are safe from this dastardly virus. Take care and stay well.

    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx
     
  4. The Warrior

    The Warrior United States Subscriber

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    Great looking stove, congrats.
     
  5. Lighthouse

    Lighthouse Sweden Subscriber

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    Can't have been used much. Super sweet nickel on it too!