1941 stamped 520

Discussion in 'Military' started by flivver, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi all: This stove has three legs a green painted steel tank and is stamped on the tank. (Is written as stamped.)

    1249229846-1941_520_001_1_1_1.jpg 1249229866-1941_520_002_2_1_3_1.jpg


    U.S.
    1941
    American

    It has no other marking except the instruction panels on the upright supports. It may be made by a manufacture other than Coleman but is definitely a 520 design. Note it is stamped 1941 not M41; interesting? The canister is steel indicating that it is military, but has no markings. The green appears to be the same shade as on the Coleman marked stoves. I tried to take close up of tank stampings but they are too scratched to photo. It is a great runner. Possibly a veteran as it has seen a lot of use. Mike...
     
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  2. CWilkins

    CWilkins Subscriber

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    Mike,
    You have an original stove that the GI's carried during WWII. They are sometimes referred to as an Ernie Pyle. Don't have any idea why but, that is the name I have heard.

    The tanks sometimes will get stress fractures. As long as you check it out it should be a-okay.

    Chuck
     
  3. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    If you Google Ernie Pyle you will see lots of references to this man.

    The stove link is mentioned in the 8th paragraph, here.
     
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  4. Knight84

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    Ernie Pyle used a nickel plated brass tank 520 with 4 legs
    Or was it 3 legs. :-k

    Here is something no collector should be without though Link

    Jeff
     
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  5. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Good grief!!

    I imagine he will be turning in his grave. :shock:
     
  6. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    :lol: :lol: :lol: No thanks, I don't play with dolls! :roll:

    Regards,

    Wim

    PS, not with plastic ones anyway 8-[ and preferably of the other sexe, before anyone starts to ask questions O:)
     
  7. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Ah Wim, at least we now know what to buy you for Chrismas! :D :D
     
  8. hydro451

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    Hi Mike,

    The three leggers were right after the 4 leggers, but pre- 530's, of this style according to Terry Marsh's site. The green painted ones have a steel tank ,but there were some made that had a nickel plated brass tank,with 4 legs, that are suppose to be quite rare.

    Your stove runs fantastic :clap: - the color and height of the flame are super - great runner for sure - like all your stoves :)

    Tom
     
  9. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi all/Tom: Yes most agree the 520 3 leg was later. That is one of the main reasons I posted this stove as it was "manufactured" in 1941. It's not marked M1941, which could have been made later. It is stamped 1941 only, which means that is the date of manufacture. It was made just following the Ernie Pyle's. It is the first run of the green G.I. 520's made from 1941-1946. Tom some green (520) stoves have brass tanks which is contrary to both Coleman and military literature. It's been many years but I believe my Ernie Pyle had 4 legs. The 530 civilian has no legs, most of them anyway. I wonder why they removed the legs for the 530, making it somewhat unstable. Mike...
     
  10. hydro451

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    Hi all,

    Mike thanks for the info about the tanks - I was not aware - Terry's site is cusory at best, so we depend on knowledgeable people like you to fill in the gaps, thanks again

    I think they abandoned the legs for economic reasons and later regretted the move as they resurrected them with new and improved legs on it's later cousin the M1950's. A much more stable
    platform with a lower center of gravity (shorter pot supports) and of course the new legs

    Here's a pic of my M1950 - 1966 Rogers
    1249311877-M1950_Rogers_1966_flame.jpg

    The only thing these stove lack is simmer control.
    It's either full-out or nothing, no simmer at all. A war zone is no place for fancy cooking I suspect :roll:

    Tom
     
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  11. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Tom: They do have simmer. The factory and military instructions tell you to use the clean out lever to effect simmer. It works quite well. I too was unaware of military "green" 520 brass tanks till I saw them on this site. Mike...
     
  12. hydro451

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    Hi all

    Mike, I swear I have tried to do simmer on this M1950, but with little or no success . It cuts down just a little , very little, not much and then bam off. Maybe we are comparing apples to oranges when comparing the 520/530's with the M1950 when it comes to simmer control. I read in a post here that one can use simmer if you lower the pressure - while stove is running ?? Sounds scary to me as there is no pressure release screw just the filler cap and this is white gas under heat and pressure

    On the 502's and the 523 medical stoves , you have the cleaner lever that will adjust flame , but be careful with the 523 lever as it gets damn hot after a while and will burn the heck out of your finger if you try to adjust flame - wonder how I know :oops: - I imagine the same with the 520/530's ??

    Mike, I think they consulted with service folks about the simmer function and found out it wasn't really necessary in the field and they abandoned the feature in the M1950 . Basically it's boil some water fast for a cup of joe or boil some water to sterilize it , heat up some soup fast, etc. so simmer not necessary - this is all speculation on my part , but from using the M1950 I'm going to have to say simmer is not a viable option on the M1950

    Tom
     
  13. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Sorry Tom: My memory is kicking in. I'll have to look it up but I think you are right some M1950's have the fuel knob and clean out built together but others do not. Those with a separate clean out can be regulated to simmer and yes the lever will burn your fingers. Mike...
     
  14. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    Some of the stoves also came with a round steel 'simmer plate' in the bottom of the pot set.
     
  15. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Steve: Believe the simmer plate came with the 530 only. Note the indent in the top of 530's pot holders for simmer plate/ flame spreader to set in. Mike...
     
  16. Knight84

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    I agree the simmering plate only came with the 530.
    But I would have traded ten simmering plates for one preheating cup any day. The only improvement in my eyes Coleman made with the 530 was the plate.
    The olde one step forward two or three steps back. :lol: :lol:

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  17. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Jeff: Why would one need a priming cup with a 530 or 530? They are both instant light. They light very easily is all weather, priming would be an added unnecessary step. Not have to prime them is one of my favorite features of the stove. Did you follow the instructions??? Mike...
     
  18. Knight84

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    Maybe I did...

    I just think this stove would benefit from a cup.
    To tell you the truth I haven't fired mine up in some time. I will try tomorrow. Thanks

    Jeff
     
  19. flivver

    flivver United States Subscriber

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    Hi all: In case your instructions are missing or unreadable: The 520/530 light the same. Pump up, turn knob 1/4 turn counter clockwise, light immediately wait till flame turns completely blue on it's own, then open all the way. Use clean out to effect simmer, (works better then using knob). Clean out lever gets very hot!!! Note; (when first lit flame will be at least 12in. high till it turns blue so do not lean over it when you light it) They usually take between 15 sec. to one minute to turn blue. Re pump once lighted and stove will maintain pressure till done cooking unless your cap leaks. When finished with stove open cap to relieve pressure after stove has cooled. This stove will light effortlessly and cook well in high wind, high altitude, extreme cold, driving rain or heavy blizzard with out shelter or wind shield ,I've done it many times on search and rescue missions when shelter or good weather was not available. ( the extreme cooking was done with a 520 but I am sure the 530 will work as well) Mike...
     
  20. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

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    There's a nice picture of him and his stove in the last book of Anthony Beevor (D-Day: The Battle for Normandy), but it's really hard to see the legs in the grass.
    Actually it doesn't looks like there's any legs at all, but with some imagination, I can see two legs in a 90 degree angle to eachother, making it a four legger.

    (I don't think it's legally correct to scan the picture from the book and show here, but the best would be for anyone interested to get the book since everything Beevor has written is well worth reading.)
     
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