1943 Coleman 520-498 Battery Heater

Discussion in 'Other Models' started by konabill, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:04 AM.

  1. konabill

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    05C3381F-66DE-45E3-8307-F12F4B632B21.jpeg DD0229F8-95A6-41CC-ACD5-2AC77B01517B.jpeg 175A1D11-C274-4301-A5B4-ABBBCBC25DAE.jpeg 4FBA985F-D829-4BC2-A8E0-1C03F14C2197.jpeg 2D263C2D-F71A-46C5-ADA3-946DC0A62928.jpeg Coleman 520 battery heater complete with original vehicle mounting bracket.
    Completely self contained and ready for use (unless some GI removed it for more important uses such as coffee )
    Telescoping funnel is unique to this version of the 520 and requires a little finesse to repack under the burner.
    The “pot support arms” are removed from the battery stove as they weren’t needed.
     
  2. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    Not seen one of these before; great stuff!

    ....Arch
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    I see, to warm up military vehicle batteries for cranking the engine in freezing conditions.

    A reference on the Terrence Marsh site: Coleman Battery Heater (pics 6 and 7, scrolling down)

    D44171DF-EF8C-4095-82C5-77672E8D639F.jpeg

    Thankfully, it’s the metal battery box it heats and not the battery directly, or there’d have been a heck of a mess!

    @Spiritburner @Christer Carlsson Perhaps move the post to the Stove Reference Gallery as a 520 model variation? I know it’s a heater as assembled, but it’s a stove at heart!
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021 at 10:02 AM
  4. Metropolitantrout

    Metropolitantrout SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Never saw one either, very cool. I've lived through some cold storms where that would have been handy. For me it wasn't so much that the battery needed warming but the oil and crankcase.
     
  5. Fettler United States

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    No, it actually makes very good sense from a technical standpoint. As the temperature goes down, the internal resistance of a battery increases and severely limits the ability to supply the rated CCA or current. Sludgy lubricants increase current demands, so it is a double whammy.

    The thing that would be a concern is GIs getting a little over-enthusiastic. How do you know when the battery is "done"? :)

    And in all seriousness frozen batteries are prone to explode, open flames and batteries are most definitely generally speaking not a good combination. They did what they had to do, I guess.
     
  6. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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  7. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Then there's the Sigg/Svea 123 combo used as airplane engine heaters...
     
  8. konabill

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    @presscall Thanks for the reference from Terry Marsh’s site.

    @OMC Thank you sir, I’ve certainly tried to add value here.

    It amazes me how many different uses the military came up with for the same items......Everytime I think I have every variant of the 520 something else appears........fun item to collect.

    @Ed Winskill I would like to see the airplane version of the sigg sometime, that would be interesting.
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    The foregoing quote is from a 2008 post; the link is long dead. But I'd seen photos of a couple of examples back then: a flexible hose from the Sigg winshield up to the small plane engine.
     
  10. magikbus

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    Keeping the battery warm in ultra cold conditions isn't the only thing you need to think of. Transmissions can be destroyed by really cold conditions and oil pumps in trucks that take over a minute to start pumping oil don't last very long. When the temps used to exceed -50F I usually draped a surplus parachute over the whole truck and slid 20 feet or so of black stove pipe under the truck with a couple of hundred thousand btu "tiger torch" (fed with a warmed propane tank) into it. It would warm up the whole truck in less than a half hour.

    I used to amuse myself at those temps with draining raw liquid propane from a tank into a tin cup and letting it splash around. You could get it to boil by just blowing your breath on it. No smoking was a pre-requisite.
    Stan
     
  11. Tron

    Tron Subscriber

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    My Land Rover D2 has a fuel burning heater installed from the factory, I think it was standard for cars sold to cold climate countries, it looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    The black electric pump at the front circulate the liquid from the cooling system around a burner chamber inside, so that the liquid is heated. It uses a glow plug to ignite the fuel, a fuel pump near the vehicle fuel tank to provide fuel, diesel in my car. It also has a fan inside to provide oxygen. We just had a cold spell with temperatures down to -18 celsius for several weeks, and I have used the heater a lot. I can switch it on without starting the car and let it run for something like 30 minutes before I start the car and then the engine is warm and there is instant warm air coming from the interior heating system. I can even fire it up by sending the car a text message.

    It is made by Webasto in Germany, mine is a model called "Thermotop". Its a brilliant way of avoiding to start a freezing cold engine, with cold, stiff oil.

    Kind regards
    Tron
     
  12. magikbus

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    Wow, ain't technology wonderful. I used to have to open the hood, open a valve, press a button repeatedly until You could see flame in the burner. It would then heat the radiator fluid which would circulate by gravity to keep the engine warm. It did have an automatic switch that opened the thermostat electrically. The electrical thermostat was the most expensive part of the whole system.
    Stan