1944 (AI) Primus 96

Discussion in 'Primus No:96' started by Mr.stove, Apr 1, 2019.

  1. Mr.stove

    Mr.stove Subscriber

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    This was a recent eBay purchase that the seller advertised as a 1955. I was very surprised when it arrived by the AI date code. It is my understanding that 1944 was a year of minimal production because of the war. It was purchased without the pot support legs which I added and is missing the metal box but otherwise it is in fair condition. I plan to clean it up and get it running in the near future.
    Gary

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  2. Lennart F Sweden

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    It was a year of extreme shortage of most fuels in Sweden except wood, wood spirit(methylated ethanol) and calcium carbide.
    Your stove was surely made for the government - either military or civil defence and either delivered in a green "military" steel box in Primus Sport style or a cardboard box, anyways in a larger crate.
    There seems to be quite few civilian Primus stoves made 1940-46.

    Even the drinking spirit was mainly made from wood waste that year.
     
  3. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Mr.stove and @Lennart F . I had never seen an AI (1944) Primus code marking until I was working with a R119 burner body recently. The year code was on the hex of the burner:

    Primus R118 /Radius Hybrid Burner

    So no 1944 markings for years, then two turn up in the same week....

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 2, 2019
  4. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    An exceptionally rare stove:thumbup:

    But 1944 ('A1') Hjorth/Primus products do surface if you are lucky and stay alert:
    e.g. model 622 blowlamp - Primus 622 'A1' 1944 a.jpg Primus 622 'A1' 1944 c.jpg
    and model 806 blowlamp - Primus 806 'A1' 1944 b.jpg :whistle:





    @Mr.stove @kerophile
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2019
  5. Lennart F Sweden

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    Gasoline and paraffin equipment was made for the swedish military during the whole war but even the military had to conserve fuel and use emergency fuels in first instance when applicable.
    The expected swedish stoves and blowlamps except the alcohol ones to find from summer 1940 - spring 1946 are types supplied to any defence function.
    Swedish pressurized alcohol burners made outside the WW1 and WW2 rationing periods are usually ordered by the military as emergency backups.
     
  6. Radler

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    Stoves are fascinating, sure!
    For me, the history around them and the conditions under which they were used, are even more interesting. Thank you Lennart for your information about the fuels during the war. Of course for most Swedes a stove without fuel was useless. But don't forget, most stoves were always made for export.

    The problem, how to survive as a neutral in a war, is complex. Surrounded by fighting neighbours you need forces for self-defence, but also the import of goods you don't have in the country and you need to survive. For both, a wise mixture of cooperation deals and resistance is necessary. We had a similar situation (or maybe worse) in Switzerland.

    I see at least two Primus No.71 with date code AI (1944) and AH (1943) in the CSS Gallery. A third No.71 dated 1944 is behind me on the shelf.

    I don't think the 71 was of any military value, it's just too small. So I guess the production of these well known stoves were for export. Swedish pressure stoves and tools had a worldwide high reputation before the wars and it was certainly useful, to try to maintain export if possible. A well known product as a PRIMUS stove became even a higher value (as a luxury good) in the world.

    Best Regards
    Radler
     
  7. Lennart F Sweden

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    Most swedish export possibilities April-40 - May-45 was to german controlled or allied countries so most foreign customers were probably high ranking officers or rich businessmen that could walk around fuel rationings.
    Switzerland had somewhat more international communications than Sweden and maybe the most aggressive of the neutral air forces, known to shoot at every intruder during the war.
     
  8. Radler

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    I just want to put this link in here. The graph shows the output of roarer and silent burners and the impressive gap during the wars. This important information is a bit hidden in the CCS documentation.
    Only about 25'000 stoves sold 1944.

    Radler
     
  9. Lennart F Sweden

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    And you can see the 1917 rationing of lamp oil and the oil shortage from battle of Norway in April 1940 until the fuel rationings were gradually lifted during 1946.
     
  10. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Fired up. Thank you Gary, completes my 96's for the 40's. No peening even to get a decent flame.
    Duane
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  11. Mr.stove

    Mr.stove Subscriber

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    You’re welcome Duane. I am glad it worked out for you. Stay safe around all those fires. Gary