1945c. M-1942 MOD

Discussion in 'Military' started by hackrtanman, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. hackrtanman

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    Recently at our island's local festival, there was a booth selling "junk." My friend bought a newer model stove for whatever reason and completely looked over this one. When I went up there again (We are a bunch of teenage males, what can I say, we just start buying cool junk!) I saw this stove and instantly knew I wanted to buy it. Anyways, bought it, found out what model number it was and took me by shock - I had absolutely no idea that it was from WW2.

    Anyways, I have used MSR stoves many times (Boyscouts) but of course, not something like this. I just wanted to know if it is okay to run this on white gas IF I chose to run it or is it just straight gasoline only. Also, should I clean it up on the outside i.e. burn marks and all of the black? Or would that decrease its value. Forgot to mention, I looked inside of the tank when I disassembled it, it looked like it had been used maybe once or twice and kept good care of. The spares inside of the pump are still there and have never been used it looks like, also. Any idea what this is worth? I don't plan on selling it, but just out of curiosity.

    So to wrap up, the main questions are:
    Will white gas run or no,
    Clean vs No clean, and what chemical,
    and what would the value be for a CA, not just a PW.

    Thanks!

    Pictures!

    1942.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2015
  2. Matukat

    Matukat Subscriber

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    You got a GREAT deal. White gas is the thing to run it on. Better than gasoline by far. Gasoline was the needed fuel in WWII. Your stove was designed by Bestor Robinson.

    Valuations are forbidden on this forum. Read the rules for the chapter and verse. A great deal, and like anything else, it's worth whatever you can get for it! I recently found out that I value my M1942 mod more than anyone is willing to give for it on ebay, even with the cookset made for it! ;-)
     
  3. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Gasolene in WW2 days was much closer to white gas than gasolene is to either these days. It will run gasolene but that is the source of your black spots and it will need frequent stripping and cleaning. Use white gas and it will run forever without blocking a jet.

    Cleaning depends on use. If it's a shelf queen then it must be clean. Polished or not is up to you. If it's a user it must be clean enough to use. No-one wants to cook on a stove with yesterday's dinner on it but otherwise, as long as its maintained its good to go.
     
  4. tetley

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    Well done on starting a good hobby and congratulations on scoring a classic stove. That's a little beauty. :content:
     
  5. orsoorso

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    I scored my first M1942 in a "partisan hide hole" (guerrilla shelter against German Wermacht during WW2) about 40 years ago and it is still my first choice when in the field, working or hiking. It will not idle easily but it boils a litre of water in 4 minutes and a full tank will last a good 2 hours at full blast. As white gas is a rarity in Italy, I use my motorbike gas and yes, priming is soothing and I clean the mesh in the generator every four tankfuls. Never failed me.

    Be careful of the NRV pip. Not difficult to check, as the pumps come out any time you refill and you cat test the NRV (do it!) every time.

    Have fun, and be safe

    Orsoorso
     
  6. SMolson

    SMolson Subscriber

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    These are fun stoves to use wonderful history and very attractive. Love the pot support system too. They are quite common on ebay so do a query to check others if you're interested in what others pay for them. There are also a few different models of this stove, the rarer ones have a sprocket wheel below the burner (one sold on ebay last week). They do not have a very controllable heat setting or range, but they are great at burning hot! They can also be an 'exciting' stove to start, 'fireballs' are quite common at first - so be careful with her.

    Just use coleman fuel, readily available in the US. Prime with alcohol in the little spirit dish, give her some pumps - just follow the directions on the label.

    As others have mentioned, checked the seals and PIP by running a few air-pressure tests first, make sure the jet is clean (use the lever to clean it) and all that other good stuff. Good luck and hope to see some flame shots (not fireballs).
     
  7. hackrtanman

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    Oops, sorry, didn't notice valuations were illegal, but other than that, thanks for all of the feedback!
     
  8. davidcolter

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    If you need a spare pump check valve rubber, leather pump cup or filler cap gasket you can get them from oldcolemanparts.com

    Search there for M1950, it uses the same parts as your earlier M1942.

    I would recommend getting all three and replacing the ones on the stove (and maybe getting fresh spares as well)

    As you can see from this video, positioning the control valve upwind is a smart move!

    [media=youtube]u38qYj4tuRc[/media]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  9. Kristian123

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    Im just wondering about how the stove you got works with closing as it should? I bought a M1950 and it had problems closing the fuel supply when turned off so it burned until I blew out the flame and let out the pressure. Don't remember what happened when I tried to fix it but remember that it was a bit hard to dismantle the tank from the rest of the stove.

    Can anybody say if there is any difference between the M-1950 and M-1942 or is it mostly the same stove?
     
  10. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    They tend to burn on for a while before going out. This is simply the residual fuel in the burner burning off and generally nothing to worry about (or fix) unless it goes on for more than a minute or so...
     
  11. Kristian123

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    My stove burned continuously without stop after I had turned it off. Was a spring in the valve that was worn if I remember right.