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1952 Military Burmos 2Pint

Discussion in 'Townson & Coxson' started by Shed-man, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. Shed-man

    Shed-man R.I.P.

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    This is a 1952 Burmos 2 Pint silent burner. It was covered in very thick and poorly applied military "Olive-drab" paint which was awful! I stripped it back to brass and cleaned it. Even the pan ring was painted the same khaki colour. However, what I do like about these stoves, and they were also made for the military by Monitor, Thermidor and possibly Buflam, is the weight of the brass used and the wonderful idea of a removable pump shaft. This made repairs in the field much easier. Steve.

    1341171893-Burmos_1_opt.jpg 1341171905-Burmos_2_opt.jpg 1341171915-Burmos_3_opt.jpg 1341171924-Burmos_4_opt.jpg 1341171935-Burmos_5_opt.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Blue Flame

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    I obtained a new (out of cardboard box Monitor C11) 1956. Only paint was Gold on the trivet.Otherwise,just Brass.
    Agree that the weight & quality of manufacturing are good
     
  3. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Steve a very nice addition,all the military stoves i have seen have had a removable pump tube like most blowlamps.
    I have often wondered why stoves except military stoves had there pump tubes soldered in,this may have been disscussed before on here, i assumed it was to keep the cost down.
    And have wondered why military stoves had a removable pump tube,i can now see why if a NRV needed a new pip, it would be far easier removing the pump, and unscrewing the NRV barrel with a pair of pliers/grips, to change the pip than to unscrew the whole NRV, that may even have seized in the pump tube which is often the case useing the NRV tool.
    I supose the screw part of the NRV which is not used would be kept as a spare or discarded.
    Will you be repainting the stove in its original olive army green in the future or keeping it polished.
    I have allso noticed, that all the millitary stoves,i have seen seem tohave a safety valve fitted in the filler cap.
    I know MONITOR and a few other makes fitted a safety valve as standard on there stoves but not all manufacturers.
     
  4. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Hate to tell you this, but my Monitor C11 MoD kero stove has a soldered-in pump tube.

    So much for the military stove = removable pump theory.

    Murph
     
  5. Wim

    Wim Belgium Subscriber

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    Yes, you're right, but these are the very late ones and I think by then economics played an important role! On the other hand, it shows how great a design them stoves were when invented late 19th century to be still in use by the military almost a century later.

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  6. Jean J

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    I do like to see brass stoves polished up like this Steve. However, my Monitor stove, which has been discussed here recently, has instruction labels both on top of tank and around side so I won't be able to clean it up as I would like.