A different viewpoint

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by BradB, Apr 3, 2021.

  1. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    I have come to look at my modest stove collection in a new to me point of view. While my collection is less than an order of magnitude compared to many here at CCS, I have begun to informally categorize my stoves. The first, and most desirable category, are stoves that can easily be maintained indefinitely. These are stoves like the Optimus 8R or Svea 123. The parts needed to maintain them can mostly be found in a hardware store. If you keep replacing the fuel cap gasket and occasionally the valve packing and wick, the stoves should be generational. The Coleman 413 and 502 with their straight stick generators would also be examples of this type. The second category contains stoves that are undeniably headed for obsolescence, no matter what you do. Stoves like the Coleman 400 series have generators that are nearly impossible to clean and are no longer available are in this category. You need to use these with the understanding that their days are numbered. For me some stoves fall in between my two categories. My classic brassies like the Primus 5 and Optimus 1S are not able to be decoked and returned to functioning. I know some of you have the equipment and ability to do this, but my success has been very limited. I have not done well with my propane torch and air compressor, or with heat and quench. My Optimus 111 would be in this category as well. Luckily, at the present time my only stove that is in questionable condition is an Optimus 00. It would not burn longer than 5 or 10 minutes when I got it. Using my crude decoking methods has restored it till I have burned it up to a half hour. Thoughts are welcome on this topic. Brad
     
  2. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Watching... 8]
     
  3. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Buy more stoves you use more so you don't run out. :)
    Duane
     
  4. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    I’m surprised. I’ve had burners going back to 1898 (an Aetna) that were retrievable. You must have had some bad examples Brad!

    John
     
  5. IvanN

    IvanN United States Subscriber

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    I don’t have any experience with de-coking, so no help there. I would hate to think the brassies are not gonna last forever, as they are my favorites
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Love it. Bring on other points of view.

    Trangia would seem to be fantastic for perpetual use as well.
     
  7. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I have a Trangia burner that the inner 'ring' split. So, not perpetual.
     
  8. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    That's a shame, Ken.
     
  9. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    @presscall I might have left the wrong impression. My Primus 5, Optimus 5, and Optimus 1S are all running well. My failures have been with a Primus 210 and the Optimus 00. But, the Optimus 00 seems to be working better the longer I use it. I did try to de-coke it as it would clog the jet in as little as 5 minutes of running. It currently runs as long as I need it to heat coffee water, as long as 15 minutes for a large copper kettle. I once timed it to run over 30 minutes so I quit trying to fix it! I guess the point of my rant was that some stoves should be relatively easy to maintain in perpetuity, while others are a bit beyond the reach of an average stove user like myself. Others are not maintainable by most of us who are not mechanical geniuses! Brad
     
  10. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    @BradB Ah, right. Sounds like the Optimus 00 is well on the way to better health!
     
  11. Brenneman

    Brenneman Subscriber

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    When decoking, heating and using compressed air/knocking the burners on a wooden block is a (complementary) method.

    On a very coked burner I usually start with inserting a stranded wire at the bottom of the burner and insert the other end of the brake wire in a cordless drill and try to ‘brush’ it open, then remove the carbon by knocking.

    Brake wire can be used for larger burners which are completely clogged, copper wire for a more subtle approach as it is less aggressive on the brass tubes of the burner.
    Brake wire can be too stiff to get it properly into an 00/210 small burner; in that case I use some stranded (copper wire).
     
  12. Haggis

    Haggis Subscriber

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    Last summer I made a deliberate effort to sell all of my “second category” stoves... I did keep a NiB Coleman 533 I picked up for $10 (I’ll use it until it dies, and then toss it out),,, all of the others have gone... I feel much the happier for it...

    I only have one coked up burner, but I haven’t really put much effort into sorting it out... I’m thinking a piece of 3/64” rabbit snare cable ought to be flexible enough to ferret its way through,,, and I have plenty of that about...