1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

AGM KampKook 2522 circa 1947

Discussion in 'AGM - American Gas machine' started by shagratork, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,524
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    This is an American Gas Machine Company stove, model 2522.

    I have dated it as approximately 1947 because in my research I have not seen the model in adverts before or after this date. If it is not 1947 than it is close to it.

    Here is an AGM advert from 1947.

    AGM_2522_Advert_1947.jpg


    This is my first ‘suitcase stove’, unless an Optimus 22 can be classed as a suitcase.
    The case is steel and its dimensions are in the above advert.

    It is a two burner camping stove and was designed to run on any type of petrol/gasoline, which at the time was mostly leaded.
    Now we would probably run it on White Gas/Coleman Fuel/Aspen/Panel Wipe.

    The front of the case has slots to take the fuel tank and generator.

    KampKook2522_01.JPG


    The top, rear and left side are plain with no cutouts.
    When packed, the legs are hinged to fit over the top to hold it in place.

    KampKook2522_02.JPG

    KampKook2522_03.JPG


    The bottom of the case has eight holes to provide drainage and air access.

    KampKook2522_04.JPG


    The legs fold down and click securely into place and provide good support.

    KampKook2522_05.JPG


    The lid lifts just past vertical and stays upright.

    KampKook2522_06.JPG


    When packed, the fuel tank with attached generator fit neatly in front of the two burners.

    KampKook2522_07.JPG


    The grate is fixed to the stove but can be pivoted to gain access to the stove parts.

    KampKook2522_08.JPG


    The fuel tank with generator can now be lifted out of the case.

    KampKook2522_09.JPG


    The generator is then slid through the hole in the front of the case and the tank is hooked into the two lots. I find this to be a secure arrangement.

    KampKook2522_10.JPG


    The grid can now be swung back in place.

    KampKook2522_11.JPG


    The windshields can be swung out.

    KampKook2522_12.JPG


    As well as providing protection from the wind, the shields are designed to lock in place and so provide stability for themselves and for the lid.

    KampKook2522_13.JPG


    The filler cap is set in a circular concave end plate with a raised edge so that a funnel is not needed.

    KampKook2522_14.JPG


    The other end of the tank has the pump. This is similar in operation to the pumps found on Coleman stoves and lanterns.

    KampKook2522_15.JPG


    The fuel tank has a two valve arrangement, each valve having its own knob.
    When lighting the stove, once the tank is pressurised, the small knob on the left is opened one turn. Then a match is lit and held at the left-hand burner and the larger front knob gradually opened until the burner lights. After burning for about one minute, the small valve on the left is closed as this just provides air for starting.

    KampKook2522_16.JPG

    KampKook2522_17.JPG


    The burner jet.

    KampKook2522_18.JPG


    The generator has a fuel filter attached to it. As well as catching debris, it was designed to filter out the lead from petrol/gasoline. The small bore pipes take the fuel into and out of the filter.

    The filter is not serviceable. When it is at the end of it life it has to be replaced.

    KampKook2522_19.JPG

    2522_Filter.jpg


    The label on the underside of the lid is in excellent condition.

    KampKook2522_20.JPG


    The left-hand silent burner.

    KampKook2522_21.JPG

    KampKook2522_22.JPG


    The ‘U’ bend casting with the top hole into which the generator jet goes.

    KampKook2522_23.JPG


    The right-hand burner head has a slightly different design to the one on the left.

    KampKook2522_24.JPG


    This burner is controlled by a sliding spindle that is normally held inside the case until it is needed.

    KampKook2522_25.JPG


    To light the burner, the spindle is slid though a hole in the side of the case.

    KampKook2522_26.JPG


    A match is then held to the burner while the valve is turned open.

    KampKook2522_27.JPG


    The instructions for this stove can be found here.

    The only problem with stove for me is that, as you may have noticed, it has never been lit.
    I did not know this when I bought it. The advertising photos did not show enough and the description did not mention it.
    This is a shame because I bought it to use. So – should I or shouldn’t I??
    Those who know me already know the answer.
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    6,769
    Welcome to the world of the Yank suitcase, Shag!

    I have several unlit stoves. They are all shiny brass, of classic Swedish or British design. Of course, they were built to be lit, but they have that ineffable quality that calls upon many of us to use some for display only.

    On the other hand, an AGM, like a Coleman suitcase, only exists to be lit. There is no other option! 8)
     
  3. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Messages:
    3,355
    Location:
    Potato Country USA
    Trevor!

    You have a very nice example of an AGM and across the pond, I might add!

    I think I would light it, but as we all know that is a decision that is totally left up to you.

    You only live once.

    I can see the blue flames now...


    Thanks,
    sam
     
  4. snwcmpr United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    7,378
    Location:
    USA
  5. Lighthouse

    Lighthouse Sweden Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    237
    Location:
    Sweden
    Trevor, a grand old stove & in perfect condition!
    Personally I would never light anything that is NOS. That makes it just another user stoves - a pretty one at that, but just another user.

    I hope that you decide not to light it & get yourself a Coleman suitcase stove to use :mrgreen:

    Thanks for sharing

    Frank
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,041
    Location:
    UK
    Do I take it, Trevor, that the filter canister piggybacked on the generator tube is an in-line component with one connecting tube taking fuel vapour ahead of a stop in the generator and the outlet tube transferring it beyong the stop?

    If so, there can be no pricker rod and pricker in there as with a Coleman. Makes sense I suppose.

    John
     
  7. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,524
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    Well John, when I first got the stove I thought exactly the same as you.

    But it does have a pricker rod attached to the large generator knob.
    I took out the rod and it is a normal looking one.
    I thought it might have a sealing attachment part way along the rod that would line up between the two filter pipes when inserted - but it does not.

    I have looked down the generator tube but it is hard to see anything - but you can look straight through it to the hole at the other end.

    The generator tube is one piece of tube with no signs of two pieces being welded together.

    When re-inserting the pricker rod there is no feeling of resistance.

    So the question is - how does the fuel filter work?
     
  8. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,524
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    I think the answer is somewhere in this AGM Patent which was filed in 1944 - here.

    I have to admit that I am struggling with the patent information. Also, the filter described is not the same design as the one on my stove.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,041
    Location:
    UK
    Interesting, Trevor. I see what you mean about the complexity of the patent. Even the inventor concedes,

    From what you've said about there being a pricker rod and when it's removed visible line-of-sight to the generator tip, combined with the inventor's mention of 'concavoconvex' baffles in the generator tube, I'm inclined to think that rather than a positive stop part-way up the generator, with vapourised fuel directed into the filter and back to the generator on the other side of the stop, there may well be something akin to those funnel-shaped pricker wire guides in Tilley vapourisers, pictured in this sectioned example

    1410295541-1304719148-5.jpg


    The pricker rod would occupy most of the hole in the guide/baffle and the vapourised fuel would more readily take the route up the feed pipe to the filter, returning to the generator tube by the filter return pipe and beyond the funnel 'baffle'.

    Well, at least unfired there's a lot that's interesting about this stove even without prospect of it's being used.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  10. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    8,524
    Location:
    Durham City, England
    Hi John

    I am pleased that you also found the patent description rather complex. It is made more difficult because all such patents are the result of Optical Character Reading and there are lots of mis-translations in the text when referring to the parts of the diagram.

    You may be right about a funneling arrangement part way up the generator. It was something I also thought about but I could not see because where the knobs are the hole in the generator is constricted so it is not possible to get good look up the tube.

    I will have another try tomorrow as it was some time ago that I took it apart.
    I will also take a couple of photos.

    The good thing is that if I ever start to use it the filter should last for many years because I would be using Aspen fuel in it so the filter should not get blocked.

    As for using the stove I might break my rule as I want to know how it performs for real.
    Ideally I would buy a similar 'user' but I think the chances of finding another one on this side of the pond are remote. Getting one from the US would cost an arm and a leg in shipping.

    There again it might be the only unfired 2522 in existence . . . . . . . .