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AGM Model #822 Kitchen Kook 1920's?

Discussion in 'AGM - American Gas machine' started by dday, Oct 29, 2009.

  1. dday

    dday United States Subscriber

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    I had this beautiful old stove shipped to me, but have not been able to locate any info on it. It is rather large in size. Any help on this models history or operation would be greatly appreciated. The gentleman that I purchased it from said that it is in working order (heard that before!), but it has more knobs and valves that any stove I have seen before. I would like to properly restore it over the winter, but will be getting it up and running before I start dismantling. Thank you in advance for any information that you can share.
    Dan
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    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. itchy United States

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    Nice stove,
    American Gas Machine Company, eh?
    Here is a place to visit if in Albert Lea Minnesota, well its just out side Albert Lea.

    The Spam® Museum
    This popular 16,500-square-foot museum exhibits the history and modern day phenomena of Spam® canned meat. When on a vacation in Albert Lea, be sure to check out this interesting museum.
    1101 North Main Street, Austin, Minnesota 55912
    (800) 588-7726
     
  3. Matukat United States

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    Beauty stove Dan! I have it's cousin from 1922, the "KampKook". That thing is a real step up from the Kampkook! Nice acquisition!!!

    https://classiccampstoves.com/posts/73650

    edit-Last I searched, you could find a lot of "AGM" print ads online and for sale on ebay. These might be the best source of info other than in the forum records.
     
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  4. marblecreek

    marblecreek United States Subscriber

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    Neat stove. I don't want to imagine what shipping cost! :D
     
  5. VooDuuChild United States

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    Wow & wow. Ya sure know how to make a fella green with envy!!! It's such a gorgeous stovetop the way it sits, I'd be hard pressed to restore one so nice.....but can't wait to see what you do with it!!!!!!!!


    vurrrrry nice indeed!!!
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hey, Dan,

    Outstanding score, my Friend!! Well done!! Are you planning a complete refurbishing, or just fettling it into life, and then using it? Either way, great Old Timer, and well worth owning! Thanks for sharing, and again, hearty congratulations! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  7. coleman413c United States

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    dday:

    Your Kitchen Kook is circa 1927-1928, maybe 1929. Your tag shows a '27 patent date. Your stove also has porcelain knobs and a built-in air pump. It was designed to compete with the Coleman Air-O-Gas series of stoves of the mid to late 20s. Even the grates are a close match. Check out the Coleman 328 Air-O-Gas on Terry Marsh's site. That one was mine, which I restored several years ago. Your stove and it, with minor differences, resemble each other.

    To find an early AGM kitchen stove as complete as yours and appearing in as good a shape as it is, is a great find. They were tough stoves. And pretty rare. My congrats to you.
     
  8. Bob M

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    Hi Joe, GREAT to see you posting here! Great bunch here! Does this have a pilot burner under the generator tube?
    What an old beauty this one is! When finished and operational it will surely be a treasure!

    Bob :clap:
     
  9. coleman413c United States

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    Hiya Bob:

    If you look at the 2nd photo showing the front of the stove, the smaller valve to the right, it does look like a pre-heating generation system. I couldn't tell you if it is the pilot burner but more than likely that it is. The main generator control is the large porcelain knob just above the fuel tank. The smaller valve by the pressure gauge is the main or master fuel shut-off to the whole system. Looking closer at the fuel shut-off, there is a "T" connection with fuel lines branching left and right. One of them leads to the pre-heating set-up while the other feeds the main generator. At least, that's what it appears to me without more pictures to look at. Either way, a nice old stove that is in good shape to begin with. Sure does make it a lot easier to restore should he want to.
    :^o
     
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  10. dday

    dday United States Subscriber

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    Thanks for the input and compliments Gentlemen!
    I was actually looking for a user (for camping) 1920's or 1930's Coleman or AGM stove and happened to stumble across this one from a very nice man in Hudson Valley NY. After receiving several additional pictures over email, I decided to buy it and he agreed to sent it via USPS. I just received it yesterday, so I haven't had much of a chance to play with it yet, other than re-install the fuel tank which he removed and wrapped in newspaper and a heavy plastic bag to contain any possible gas smell. Though I like old stoves that are original and in new condition, I also like old stoves that are in less than new condition. I guess the reason is that I can learn how they work and then try to make them work and look like new again :) . It is like therapy ( I need lots of it :D ) to me at times, so that is the reason I would like to eventually take my time and make this look like a beautiful stove again. I realize it might be worth more original, but thats half the fun of owning it me thinks.

    Hi Matukat, I like your #3, great find and man you always find the deals!! Looks like you need a few missing pieces and you'll be up and running. Before I bought this stove, I looked high and low for information on this model and even looked at all the AGM adds on ebay to no avail :( . Thanks for the tip though.

    Evening Doc, I do plan on using it if it simmers well and has plenty of high end, which I'll bet its got.

    Hi Bob, You are correct that this does have a pilot control. I will upload a picture showing the front of the stove and some of the manifold tomorrow. I thought that is what this was, but could not be sure until you mentioned it.

    Welcome to the forum Joe and thank you for your knowledge of this stove. I looked at your coleman and man is that nice. It is very similar to this old AGM, but I love the two different pot supports on yours. This stove has more knobs and valves that I ever imagined a stove would have. It has a pressure gauge and a fuel gauge (both with cracked glass :( ), three porcelin knobs, two dials (one under the second burner and one on the pump) and the fuel on/off valve. Thanks again and I look forward to seeing some more of your stoves soon.

    Dan
     
  11. coleman413c United States

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    Hello Dan and thank you very much for the welcome. I must confess that my knowledge of AGM products in the area of stoves is somewhat limited, which is true of early Prentiss Wabers stoves as well but I do know some things about them. I know more about older Colemans, being as that was my passion.

    I, too, used to do a fair amount of restorations of stoves as a kind of therapy myself but mainly, I just enjoyed doing it. Oftentimes, I had to wonder just what was going through my mind when I obtained them and began to strip them down. Especially when some of them qualified as basket cases. My old Model 140 Coleman Bungalow Cooker was an excellent case in point. Took over 3 months to restore back to operating condition and cosmetically with some minor fabrication of parts and on other parts, major repairing with the help of an old school welder who understood the properties of 80 year old cast iron.

    Unfortunately, I've had to sell off my collection almost in its entirety. Hopefully, I can go back to collecting and restoring in the future. In the meantime, I can only be a bystander and read with interest(and envy) some of the acquisitions many of you have had, wishing it was me who obtained them.

    With many early Coleman stoves, it is far easier to date them being as there is so much information out there but it does take some detective work and it did help that Coleman did print out some data sheets regarding when many models came out.

    With AGM, Prentiss Wabers and others, we, as collectors, are not as fortunate to find such information. Instead one has to peruse old product and parts catalogues to find when many of these models first appeared, if you can get lucky in finding them in the first place. Patent dates do help some. Other things I look for is general appearance, placement and style of parts and other tell tales. And plain logic in the scheme of things. And, of course, information exchange with others who have similar items or who know of it somehow.

    Remember, the parts of these old stoves are irreplaceable. But oftentimes, many of these parts were shared by other models as well so if you find a part that is no good, be patient and watch for other stoves, not necessarily an identical model(one is rarely that lucky) and look closely at the part(s) in question. You might be able to utiize it. Of course, that might mean you have to buy a whole stove for that one part but sometimes, that is how the game is played with restorations. And before I forget, guard those grates with your life! Of all the parts that are the hardest to find, grates are it, in my experience.

    Case in point regarding parts sharing was with my Model 140 Coleman cooker, my main burner cap was 50% gone, generator was totally plugged up and the preheating generator was half gone itself. I found out by comparing pictures and experimenting, an early Coleman Handy Gas Plant, which I had that was non-functional, had the parts I needed(burner cap and a decent generator, even though it was warped from heat. My preheating generator I made out of an Q99 lantern generator. Overall length was the same. The hard part was duplicating the double loop the original one had. When all was said and done, the cooker worked like a charm. Man, did it put out some serious BTUs! I think your AGM will do so as well. Two different appliances yet some parts commonality including the combination air stem/fuel cap and the porcelain burner knob.

    Enjoy your stove.

    Joe
     
  12. sefaudi Bosnia and Herzegovina

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    Hey Dan,

    What a lovely stove you had. Please always keep us advised at each fettling step you go ahead.
     
  13. hydro451

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    Super stove Dan, just terrific- such good condition too. Can't wait to see it running.

    Hi Joe , Welcome aboard, it 's me Tom Midgette, great to have you here - Your vast knowledge of Colemans and AGM's, etc will be greatly welcomed here - thanks for joining - Damn glad to to see you here, I saw the "coleman 413c" name and said , uh ? same as Joe's , but then I saw your comments and knew it was you - fantastic :clap: :clap: CCS has gained a great asset ! I'm so happy :)

    Tom
     
  14. Bob M

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    I SECOND THAT!

    Bob
     
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  15. dday

    dday United States Subscriber

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    Thanks for the great advice Joe. Sorry to hear that you sold most of your collection off, but just think of all those great projects that are waiting out there for you :) . Also think of all the smiles you created when a lucky buyer purchased one of your beautiful stoves. I found a topic here on CCS a month or two ago regarding a absolutely gorgeous restored coleman 2c that I believe was for sale? Was that one of your restorations? If so, you did a fantastic job. Again thank you for your advice and I look forward to hearing about some of your experiences and future stove projects.

    After work today, I managed to get an hour or two in working on the AGM. I had a few leeks on the fuel lines, a hard pump plunger and the tank cap was hard as a rock. After a nitrile gasket, a super high quality Sefa coleman cup (thanks Sefa) and some sealing, I was ready for the test :shock: . After figuring out the pilot light I was up and running!!! I am super super happy :D/ :D/ . After a few minutes, it really smoothed out. It has great high heat and simmers very well also. Here are the first pics in action.
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  16. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Evening, Dan,

    You have got a winner, there, my Friend!! Well done!! :clap: :clap: I also have to agree that it's very nice to have Joe amongst us, too! Even before he joined up, he was very kindly giving me advice and information about my old Coleman #7 range! He knows his stuff, and is very sharing of his knowledge and experience. Perfect fit for CCS, me thinks! Thanks, Joe! Dan, once again, very good job of fettling, and I think you have a really nice stove on your hands, which should bring you many years of satisfaction and pleasure. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  17. coleman413c United States

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    First of all, my thanks to Tom Midgette & Bob Meyer for welcoming me to this forum. I hope I can be of benefit to those few out there that have early Coleman, AGM & Prentiss Wabers stoves. I do have some knowledge, more on Coleman than the other two makes but in no way am I an expert. Much of my knowledge has come from the tried and true school of hardknocks with a little help of some paperwork, parts of old catalogues and information gleaned and offered to me during my collecting and restoration days.

    Dday: Fantastic job of getting the old girl lit up. It didn't surprise me that you were able to judging from the first photos you posted on it. It looked too good and complete not to function. As I said before, these old stoves were built tough and with a little care, will far outlive any of us. And still function! And yes, those leaks can be troublesome if you are not careful. Too many fuel line connections, not to mention the old packings on the valves.

    To answer your question regarding a 2C stove, that was not me. I did restore a 9D over a year ago that an old boyhood friend had given me, which had belonged to his father. I fully restored it and presented it back to him in front of his mom several months later. Was they shocked! He gave it, in turn, to his oldest son and he uses it frequently on his outings and as a remembrance of his grandfather, an heirloom, so to speak. That one is featured on Terry Marsh's site.

    I also restored a Model 1 Coleman stove 2 years ago that someone had put up in another part of this forum. That one is also on Terry's site.

    While I do miss my collection greatly and the enjoyment I had in restoring the stoves I had, hopefully, I can impart some of my knowledge I gained from doing it to someone out there that have similar stoves.

    Doc Mark: Thank you again for your welcome. Part of me envies you on your old Model 7 Coleman stove.

    Joe
     
  18. VooDuuChild United States

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  19. agmsteve

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    dday,
    Joe gave you some great info. The 822 was built in the 20,s. I have your exact stove featured in a 1927 AGM product line catalog. I also have the same stove down in the shop. Have fun with her. If you ever need any agm questions answered. I can help out. Thanks
     
  20. dday

    dday United States Subscriber

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    Thank you Steve. I have several AGM stoves, all suitcase varieties with the exception of this 822 Kitchenkook, and like them very much. I would however like to add a #3 to my collection as I was told they are very small. I also have a Kitchenkook that I cannot find any history on. I purchased it last year in New York and it does not appear to have ever been lit. It has some scuffs to the enamel and a little surface rust on the legs, but no heat marks whatsoever on the burners or the oven. If you could shed any light, it would be appreciated. Thanks again,
    Dan
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