AGM WCS3

Discussion in 'AGM - American Gas machine' started by Marc, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    For your inspection today is my second non-Coleman suitcase stove, an AGM WCS3.

    "The best camp stove money can buy." Pure marketing, of course.
    20190705_175120.jpg

    Overview of case. The photo does justice to the outside, what it doesn't show about the inside is that many areas were sticky and greasy with someone's bacon sarnie leftovers.
    20190705_175204.jpg 20190705_175301.jpg

    Rear label once windscreen wings were folded out of the way. Slash across is mostly icky grease, not rust.
    20190705_175317.jpg

    Pump/filler cap removed, overview. The grey/gray section is actually painted or plated brass, not aluminum.
    20190705_175435.jpg

    Pump rod screws down. I didn't see a seal anywhere but I think this is a very rudimentary version of Coleman's locking pump. 20190705_175504.jpg

    Pump leather was intact but bone dry. 20190705_175540.jpg

    Pump leather oiled and reinserted, the pump worked beautifully and pressurized the tank just fine. Soapy water sprayed on the works, with pump handle screwed down it seems to hold pressure just fine. 20190705_175937.jpg

    What about without the pump handle screwed down? That won't do! Time to have a look at the NRV. 20190705_180000.jpg

    Tight grip with a rubber work glove on the pump tube and an adjustable spanner on the NRV nut got it loose. Here's a view of the NRV seat: 20190705_180231.jpg

    To be continued, next post.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2019
  2. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    NRV assembly:
    20190705_180348.jpg

    As much of a close-up as my phone will do on the NRV pip itself. Note the cross-wire in the spring, it fits into the slot visible on the side of the NRV pip holder. 20190705_180357.jpg

    Reverse side of the pip holder: 20190705_180528.jpg

    Pressed the pip holder against the nitrile sheet I had to create a ring, giving me a rough shape to cut out: 20190705_180749.jpg

    Previous pip came out with the consistency of cheese, remnants can be seen in the lower right of the photo. Replacement pip in place: 20190705_181033.jpg

    Reassembly in this order: 20190705_181156.jpg

    Result? No bubbles, no rising pump rod. Success. 20190705_181412.jpg

    Overview of the burners with cap and flame rings removed: 20190705_181548.jpg 20190705_181551.jpg

    Peek inside the auxiliary burner, showing the valve controlling that burner. Here it is, in the open position: 20190705_181716.jpg
     
  3. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Here it is, in the closed position:
    20190705_181747.jpg

    Model stamp, and grunge: 20190705_182320.jpg

    Interesting feet, they pull straight down and click into slots in the side of these sleeves. Here visible in the extended position and locked into place: 20190705_182616.jpg

    A quick squeeze of the two vertical pieces allows the foot to be pushed into the body of the stove: 20190705_182627.jpg

    Upon pumping for test firing, the fuel cap/pump tube started leaking fiercely despite sealing just fine previously. The O-ring was rock hard. D'oh, I know better, should have checked that. Here it is, replaced with an O-ring from an assortment I had on hand. 20190705_183004_001.jpg

    Holding pressure amid soapy water just fine, it's now go-time: 20190705_183212.jpg

    Success! 20190705_183532.jpg

    Auxiliary burner: 20190705_183618.jpg

    Whatever shall I do with a running stove? Got that one figured out. (Yes, I put the lid back on the perc basket before closing it up.) 20190705_184831.jpg 20190705_184902.jpg 20190705_185052.jpg
    Stove still needs a good cleaning, but otherwise it's good to go.

    Glad to finally get some stoving in. Thanks to everyone for reading along.
     
  4. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I've always wondered which is "the best camp stove money can buy." Now I know it's an AGM WCS3. And a very well presented one I might add. Thanks for going to the effort.

    Ben
     
  5. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Great presentation.
     
  6. JP2

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    Very nice plus I have learned a lot because I don't know much about those one.
    Thank
     
  7. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Thanks gents, appreciate the kind comments.
     
  8. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Any idea of the date of this stove?
     
  9. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Terry Marsh's site lists an AGM model LCS-42, which looks to be a copy of this stove in a different color, and dates that model to the late 50's.

    Edit: The cardboard box styling and sticker make me want to put this stove later than that, into the 60's or even 70's, but I have no documentation for that and am likely wrong.
     
  10. ROBBO55

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    A good detailed post @Marc :clap:
     
  11. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    @ROBBO55 Thank you!

    During the first test of this stove, it had the occasional orange tinge to the flame, so while I was busy in the shop doing various things(I was...ahem.....tidying up...) yesterday evening, I fired it up and gave it a "bloody good gallop" as James Herriot might have said. Burn the last few remnants of the old stale fuel out of the system.

    Today I refueled it with a substantial amount of fresh white gas, and took the opportunity of having a running stove to try "canned dog", a delicacy I've seen reported here on the forum.

    Once the stove was up on stride, it burned without the occasional orange tinge of before.

    20190707_135457.jpg

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    Not bad. Should have used the other burner for potatoes.