Any info on steel camp pan Cello, AS Campbell Co Boston?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by GeneH, Nov 20, 2019.

  1. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    Admins: I didn't know where else to post this, so pls move as you wish. Hopefully CCS can help.

    I picked this up at Goodwill for $5. It's 6 in. 20% thicker than my cool handle pans. I cannot find any info for this pan, just brass flasks by Campbell.

    BTW, just a little clean up and seasoned and it's like a frictionless surface for frying eggs and ham.

    IMG_8569.jpg IMG_8571.jpg IMG_8572.jpg
     
  2. SveaSizzler

    SveaSizzler United States Subscriber

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    Looks like the WWII vintage steel fry pan/handle/lid clamp from a Boy Scout messkit. Due to wartime shortage of aluminum, Scouts were encouraged to turn in aluminum for scrap. The steel pan was the replacement.
     
  3. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    Ah - good lead. I see that vintage steel now. close. just not the same handle connection to the pan. As a side note, I also found the long tin contqainer I picked up is a 50's tall meal serving container.
     
  4. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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    CELLO Gene !

    Oh those old things, they were recalled as hazardous to your health. I'll cover postage, please just forward it to me and I'll do all the archive paperwork to confirm it is secured in an approved hazardous materials storage facility. PM me for the particulars.


    hehehehe
    CELLO, I am sure I measured mine across the top at 7 1/2" (it holds 3 3/4c to brim). I really like 'em.
    Is it the bottom of your fry pan that measures 6".

    re your OP: "Any info on a steel camp pan, CELLO..."?
    why yes there is
    here
    A year you see there is c1922 but yours makes the 3rd version of CELLO fry pan and it "looks like" yours is the oldest of the 3.
    The Cello pan is larger, sturdier and may be the best BSA solo fry pan ever made?
    Thanks for posting it.

    PS oh, the all steel mess kits SveaS mentions... Cello is not that. Those steel/tin kits are also in that link if you scroll up to "c1941 - c1945: during aluminum rationing".
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2019
  5. Majicwrench

    Majicwrench Subscriber

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    Ha! I may have passed on one of those yesterday at an out-of-town thrift store, it was labeled something odd and then the boy scout logo and it was waaaay heavier than any other boy scout cook set I had ever seen.
     
  6. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    LOL! Only because heavy steel is such awesome cookware that you eat to much.
     
  7. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    @OMC yes I measured the bottom and should have measured across the top.

    I read the thread you linked to and that’s more good information. The one thing about my pan is that the handle does not hinge in any fashion. It keys into 2 holes and a wingnut secures the handle to the pan.
     
  8. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    Run back and get it!


     
  9. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    The snaps on the bag are marked, "RAUF CO. PROV. R.I."

    Here is more detail of the handle connection to the pan. Yes, the pan is 7 1/2 in across the top, 6 in on the flat bottom. At the possible age of this thing, 1920's something to 1940's something, I'm not sure I want to use it as a camping skillet now, especially since there isn't much info on it. Probably not of an real $value, but nice piece of history.

    0AC638C1-A29E-4B98-AF19-2B69C8322574.jpeg

    IMG_8573.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2019
  10. Radler Switzerland

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    For cooking, not for carrying, a well maintained an seasoned steel pan is much superior to any aluminium pan.

    Aluminium pans and kitchen gear became popular during and after the war in Switzerland. Aluminium was the only metal we could produce in Switzerland. There was shortage of steel, copper, coal and everything, but Bauxit (mineral to produce aluminium) and (hydroelectric produced) electric energy we had in the country. SIGG and some other producers made almost every thing and became pioneers for aluminium products then.

    Regards
    Radler
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2019
  11. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    Thanks for that bit of history Radler. I love the history of things.
     
  12. Laitch

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    It'd make a better banjo than a cello.
     
  13. GeneH

    GeneH Subscriber

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    I'm still trying to figure out a snarky reply but it just isn't coming to me. :-({|= :lol: