Anyone an authority on Grease?

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by presscall, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Not the movie, but to help me decide on the best of three options that I know of (High Temperature LM Grease - Graphite Grease - 'Copaslip' type Grease) or another alternative even more suitable for a specific application I have in mind.

    THIS Bukta Methex stove, in common with many other gravity-fed alcohol stoves has a regulator without a graphite packing, relying on the threads of the regulator spindle to prevent fuel vapour blow-by. On higher settings on the Methex there is some blow-by, to the extent that the escaping vapourised fuel will briefly ignite. The solution is to pack the regulator threads with grease, but the spindle gets hot and the best grease to resist the heat without gumming up or melting and dribbling out gets my vote.

    Your thoughts on this issue would be much appreciated.

    John
     
  2. Normo

    Normo Subscriber

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    Considered some of the high temp. thread jointing pastes? Or good old teflon tape? Won't help if the spindle itself has to be sealed.

    N
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2017
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @presscall

    What about graphite powder on the threads?

    I'm no expert on grease, but some mechanic here should pop in. I use copper grease on stoves but I have no idea whether it is suitable for this task.

    Tony
     
  4. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Generally I use copper grease ( never seaze ) or graphite grease. Boath work well and will make them come apart in the future even if they dri out. As a last resort I will use Teflon tape to seal something that is not in direct flaim. All are suitable in my opinion.

    Cheers
    Rob
     
  5. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    For what it's worth, I'd go for the graphite grease or powder, maybe a combination of both. The copa slip and similar products are merely to prevent things to seize up between the time you assemble/disassemble things (like exhausts on cars, spark plugs etc., or vapourizers on 71s, 80s, 123s and the like).

    All the best,

    Wim
     
  6. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    @presscall

    Hi John, in a previous life I used to use copper slip on plastic injection nozzles at temps up to and above some times 400 deg c. It was never used to seal anything as such though as they were always an interference fit. Have you thought about using some high temp silicone and mixing some graphite in with it?

    Si
     
  7. Peter.C

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    @presscall
    John ive used a graphite powder and beef dripping mix as a great anti seize, just enough dripping to make a dough out of it apply to threads etc.
    best of luck.
    Peter
     
  8. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    There is also nickel anti-seize to think about too, it can stand much higher temps - upto nearly 2,500°C. I've found on applications around burners that it forms quite a stiff paste after firing which might be helpful in a situation like this. But as with other suggestions only an actual test will tell.
    Ian.
     
  9. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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  10. Dr Phun

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    How hot? For something that doesn't get too hot, I use silicone grease. Made for o-rings, so it is sold in the plumbing section for lubricating o-rings in faucets. The internet says it is good up to 300 or 400 degrees F, and it is relatively thick. I think you want a thick grease for sealing, that would resist alcohol. Wheel bearing grease is a little thicker and rated for 500 degrees F but not sure how it would handle alcohol.

    How does everyone else lubricate their o-rings? For example, (not a hot application) I got an Optimus pump for a SVEA 123 that was stiff and didn't seal well. I took it (and the matching cap) apart, cleaned it up and lubed the o-rings with silicone grease and it works like new.
     
  11. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Thanks All! Sound suggestions all. I may resort to one or another.

    Meanwhile I'm trying an alternative I had to hand of a graphite-based 'grate polish' I use to get my cast iron goods gleaming.

    IMG_1924.JPG


    It fills the threads on the regulator spindle when screwed in.

    IMG_1923.JPG


    I tried it out on two Bukta Methex stoves. It worked in preventing vapourised fuel escaping past the spindle threads without melting and seeping out, maintained a smooth regulating action and didn't lock up the spindles on cooling.

    IMG_1925.JPG

    IMG_1926.JPG


    Cooled off I removed the regulators and saw that the polish had remained in place and hadn't degraded.

    IMG_1927.JPG


    I see how it fares longer term and will hang onto this thread for future reference, should I need to resort to one of your excellent suggestions.

    Thanks!

    John
     
  12. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    I use the silicon grease included in Primus and MSR stove maintenance kits, intended for lubricating pump cup washers.
     
  13. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Well 'ya bugga', I live and learn!
     
  14. G1gop

    G1gop United Kingdom Subscriber

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    We used silicon grease on all 'o' rings to help stop them drying out.
    We also used lithium grease on vacuum seals and high temp joints.
     
  15. dogface

    dogface United States Subscriber

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  16. cottage hill bill

    cottage hill bill Subscriber

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    John, My only hesitation with the cast iron polish is that anything meant as a polish most likely has some sort of abrasive in it. Not what you want on a threaded fitting. I think one of the anti-seize lubes would work well. I've got a quart can of Never-Seize brand that was partly used 45 years ago when I got it and is still half full. Be careful using it on fasteners though, it is a torque multiplier. Some have learned the hard way when using it on engine head bolts. Only other down side is that if you get it on your hand it will immediately spread to a one molecule thick layer on both hands and all tools you touch. ;)
     
  17. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    For similar applications I use Krytox XHT-AC. It's expensive but a little goes a long way. I contains corrosion inhibitors and is meant for extreme temperatures up to 750F. Here's the brochure.

    Ben
     
  18. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Whole range of anti-seize possible options there @dogface. Thank you.

    Good point @cottage hill bill about the association of abrasive with anything calling itself 'polish'. Gave me a bit of a forehead-slapping "Doh" moment there!

    Having just rubbed a blob of the stuff (messily) between finger and thumb it doesn't have a feel of a paste with abrasive content. I suspect that it's lacking any abrasive action, but carries graphite in a binder substance that enables the powdered graphite to be distributed over the surface before wiping off the excess and burnishing it with a rag.

    @z1ulike Thanks Ben. Haven't tracked down a UK source as yet but the specs are impressive.
     
  19. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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  20. Dr Phun

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    I thought about polish usually meaning abrasiveness, but I think what you are referring to as polish is also called stove black. Stove black isn't really a traditional abrasive polish - it is more of a heat resistant finish for cast iron stoves. Here is a description I found for one brand:

    "Williams Stove Black has been using the same proven formula for over 100 years. Although they've called this "stove polish" since the turn of the last century, it's more like wood stain for stoves. It comes out of the tube pure black, and you rub it on with a rag. The stove black polish withstands high heat, and leaves the cast iron stove with a dull sheen that's more attractive and traditional than paint.
    • Semi-paste
    • Contains no chemicals, waxes or solvents
    • Just pure graphite and carbon
    • Odorless
    • Cleans up with soap and water"

    I often use antisieze. It is very good anytime different metals are in contact to prevent them from corroding together (like steel bolts into aluminum). Because it spreads out so readily, I don't think it would provide much sealing benefit, though.