Barthel butane camping stove

Discussion in 'Other Barthel Brands' started by presscall, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    9,132
    The packaging is a bit dog-eared, but contains an unused stove and a full gas cartridge

    1322174562-1.JPG

    1322174571-2.JPG

    1322174587-3.JPG

    1322174597-4.JPG


    Gas cartridge is unique to the stove, lindal-valve equipped, but not a screw fitting or faceted like a Coleman Powermax stove, so you'd be forgiven for wondering how it connects up ... revealed in a moment!

    1322174627-5.jpg

    Rough translation ...

    Attention! Combustible contents under pressure. Protect from sunlight and heat above 50%C Do not spray into flames and do not throw into fire. Isobutane is heavier than air Disposable container - not refillable

    Directions for use: Use only for intended equipment. Avoid piercing - pressure vessel! Keep away from children.



    Here's the outlet of the cartridge, plain, not threaded

    1322174641-6.JPG


    Hopefully this sequence will make it clear how the fitting works

    1322174662-8.JPG 1322174675-9.JPG 1322174689-10.JPG 1322174701-11.JPG 1322174715-12.JPG 1322174759-13.JPG


    The plastic insert is clicked into the neck of the cartridge first. Screwing the insert and cartridge assembly into the stove's valve housing pushes the inlet probe in the valve into the cartridge to depress the lindal valve spring and allow the gas to flow, an 'O'-ring seal on the probe ensuring a gas-tight seal. At the same time, the plastic component expands in the cavity of the cartridge neck, ensuring it's firmly locked into place. Neat.


    The jet nipple gives the impression at first sight of a typical Primus kero type ...

    1322174785-14.JPG

    ... but has a much smaller diameter threaded portion

    1322174803-15.JPG


    The stove disassembled and assembled, then with the legs stowed for packing. The burner cap is captive and could only be removed by levering up tabs on the brass component

    1322174905-17.JPG 1322174938-18.JPG 1322174992-19.JPG


    I've listed this as a Barthel stove because of the name and Barthel logo on the gas cartridge original to the stove, but there's nothing on the stove itself that marks it as a Barthel product

    The stove packaging reveals another manufacturer, ORSTA, which initial research suggests took over ownership of Barthel, or some part of it, and used the good old name on this product line

    1322175034-20.JPG

    1322175068-21.JPG


    Flame shots follow in a 'reply'

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    9,132
    Simmer up to full heat, smoothly controllable

    1322177131-22.JPG 1322177143-23.JPG 1322177153-24.JPG 1322177164-25.JPG


    Campingaz Rando stove cartridges fit I've noticed, but just a curiosity, since there's not a lot of point packing such a small cartridge and a stove that's much larger than the one it was intended for

    1322177177-26.JPG


    One for the 'Frankies, Mods and Hybrids' forum, but the Barthel gas cartridge was easy to refill ...

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  3. hikin_jim

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,519
    John,

    Perhaps I shouldn't be surprised, but I continually am. How do you find pristine old gas stove after pristine old gas stove?

    Very interesting how the connector works. Very similar to Coleman Powermax.

    Interesting also that it looks a bit like the Primus Grasshopper. It seems there were a number of such similar looking stoves back in the day. The fact that no such stoves are made today may have something to say about how practical the style is.

    HJ
     
  4. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    4,221
    Location:
    Dendermonde, Belgium
    Hi John, very nice example! You are well on your way to have the largest "gassies" collection worldwide! ;) :D/ .
    Regarding the manufacturer, that's another piece 'o cake. I guess you have to call it a "VEB Hydraulik Rochlitz" as that's the factory that made it (Volks Eigenes Betrieb: people's own company). It was part (subsidiary)of the Group (kombinat) ORSTA Hydraulik. The factory was at Geringswalde (Station street). There were no privat companies left in East Germany, all were "owned" by the people :roll: so names were of no importance most of the time.

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  5. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    9,132
    No secret cache or Indiana-Jones-like resourcefulness or determination Jim. This one came from ebay.de. I find specific country searches with a 'translate the page' facility engaged is more productive than a 'worldwide' search from the English site alone.



    You're right about the similarities of course.

    In terms of practicality, the design type makes it unweildy to pack, but the write-up for the Primus Grasshopper in Snowgoose's copy of 'Off Belay' in the Stove Reference Library suggests that it's height above a tent groundsheet is an advantage due to the reduction in conducted or radiated heat over a ground-hugging stove - of course, that puts it nearer to the tent roof ...



    Thanks for all that information about the East German manufacturer, Wim, and the political and social context of that time and place.

    Regarding my gassie collection ... well, possibly ... I'm not sure that my interest would be understood or condoned by those who see LPG stoves as having killed off their beloved classic liquid fuel stoves! Following Campingaz's lead with its Bleuet, the 'big names' in petrol and kero stove manufacturing seem to have marketed one or more, so they just saw it as another selling opportunity.

    I like the 'brassies' and the 'gassies' both, as I'm sure many of us on CCS do, and the ingenuity and variation of designs of the LPG stuff is fascinating.

    I've been thinking of using my collection to illustrate a (lengthy!) post in the Stove Forum exploring the various types, constructional details, operating characteristics and chronology of the things - a sort of "Encyclopaedia Butanica" - though I'll probably ditch the cheesy title!

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  6. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    Messages:
    4,221
    Location:
    Dendermonde, Belgium
    Speaking of gassies, at my local hardware shop today I saw pearceable cans (the 190g ones) with a butane/propane mix. Maybe I never noticed before, but it's the first time I spotted these. I thought pearceables came with butane only.

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  7. hikin_jim

    Offline
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    4,519
    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    You're just the man to do it, John.

    I like you find old gassies fascinating. The different things they tried, all the permutations, the ideas both good and bad (and sometimes laughably absurd). It fascinates me that some really good designs like the ALP and the Hank Roberts didn't make it. The stoving world is poorer for it.

    True about the fact that the Grasshopper style stove is further from a tent floor, but seems like pots atop that style are a bit less stable, and that style puts the flames up a bit into the wind. That style is also difficult to use a windscreen with.

    HJ
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  8. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Messages:
    9,132
    Well observed, Jim. A bestseller nevertheless, but I wonder if their survival rate (they're always cropping up on ebay) suggests that having discovered their faults, owners set them aside, barely used.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015