Beautyfly Burner

Discussion in 'India' started by RonPH, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. RonPH

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    An officemate of mine recently came back from India for vacation knowing my love for stoves bought me only the burner, flame ring, and spirit cup. Shoulda bought the whole stove but you cant look a gift in the mouth. The burner is I should say mass produced in India. What was interesting and I have not doubt to what he said about the spirit cup and flame ring. The shopkeeper had a small shop the size of a small bedroom and worked his trade on the sidewalk. Upon approaching the shopkeeper, he was more keen on showing off his talent rather than sell his items. Being in a hurry, my friend just asked if he has small stoves, unfortunately they were all the large size for home cooking. So he opted to buy just a burner as a present. My friend ask for the flame ring and spirit cup and the shopkeeper said one moment and he poured molten steel into a flat surface (weird) using his hands and tools (without as much as a glove) and within 3 minutes fabricated a spirit cup and flame ring. The cost for all three is $2. The shopkeeper wanted my friend to stay long and even said if you want something made, to just give him a sketch and he could do it apparently showing off, based on my friends description, a locally made Borde out of rough metal. Interesting! My friend will go on another vacation this Jan 2010 and I will be sending him some stove parts to see if the shopkeeper and duplicate it to exact specifications for mere loose change.

    Sigh! :cry: The burner will have to wait for a tank to mate it with for now.

    Ron 1251745080-Article_001.jpg 1251745093-Article_002.jpg 1251745130-Article_004.jpg 1251745148-Article_005.jpg 1251745162-Article_006.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. Zincman

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    I'm interested to know how this shopkeeper turned molten steel into a brass flame ring and spirit cup? Is that a typo? Can he do lead into gold as well?
     
  3. RonPH

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    I do not think the flame ring is made of brass, the last process according to my friend was to dip it into something to prevent rusting. But according to my friend he is good at it with most metal...brass included. So I will try to see if he can produce some nice brass spirit cups and flame rings...and other stuff.

    Ron
     
  4. brassnipplekey

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    Sounds like a plan :)
    Good luck :)
    India has a way with plans ;)

    Nick
     
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  5. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    Does the burner screw thread match the Swedish burner screw threads?
     
  6. Zincman

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    As steel melts at around 1300 degrees C (2400F) depending on the alloy, I'm afraid I can't swallow the idea of someone in a street workshop having kit to work at that temperature. He would need Oxy-acetylene or an induction type furnace and serious refractory crucibles, not to mention burning his retinas with the glare from the molten metal. (same intensity of light as from gas welding)
    Sorry to be pedantic but 25 years as a jeweller/silversmith tells me there is a mistake somewhere here. I have seen film of highly skilled Indian craftsmen at work, creating wonderful stuff with very basic equipment but never working steel in its molten form in a bazaar type environment. Hot forging certainly but not molten steel
    The colour of the pieces is very similar to what is known in the UK as Bright Zinc Plated, a yellow finish usually applied as an electroplate (as opposed to hot-dipped galvanized).
    BZP will come off with heat or abrasion leaving untreated steel exposed to the rigours of the enemy which never sleeps, rust.
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Ron, the kerosene consumption figure of 360g per hour, given on the box, would make this burner equivalent to that on a Primus No.2.

    This Indian burner will have a maximum power output of around 4.5kW or 15000BTU per hour.

    I agree with Zincman regarding the fabrication process. It is extremely unlikely that it involved steel melting, for the reasons he gave.


    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  8. RonPH

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    The thread does not match the primus/optimus stoves. Either I re-thread it or find a suitable adapter.
     
  9. RonPH

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    Kerophile/Zincman, I know its highly improbable but the shopkeeper did have a small foundry inside his shop and whichever way you think, as long as he can get the job done, am willing to go and give it a shot at him fabricating some stove parts which are perhaps hard to find nowadays. And in my belief there are such persons gifted with their "hands" who can do wonderful metal craft.
     
  10. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

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    Hmm . . . crimped flame ring and spirit cup . . . I wonder why ?
     
  11. RonPH

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    Its just a design he wanted to show off really. Used a hammer and nail of sort while metal was still hot before cutting it into shape according to my friend though its nicely done without sharp edges.

    Ron
     
  12. Zincman

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    Ron, I wasn't questioning the existence of a foundry in the workshop, they are fairly common. Non-ferrous alloys are relatively easy to melt and cast. My point was about the melting and pouring of steel, a different process altogether.
    The proof of the pudding will be when you fire up using that flame ring.
    If it all works out you will no doubt end up with a huge order book from all the stovies who have unobtainable parts missing!
     
  13. RonPH

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    Zincman, noted that. The flame ring is undoubtedly not cast iron and measuring the thickness of the material against the original flame rings of my stove is off only by how shall a say a few microns perhaps. In any case I still have to find a suitable tank to mount the burner and use the flame ring and how it measures up performance wise. Thanks for the new knowledge you have imparted.

    Ron
     
  14. brassnipplekey

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    Observations .
    Having spent a while in India & have an interest in stoves & engineering :-
    Beautyfly :) .. Suspiciously sounding ?like the Lee Hin (Singapore) Asian brand Butterfly :)
    The burner to riser thread is tapered , not intended to be used with sealing(heatproof) washers, no machined mating face .
    The spirit cup and flamering are die pressed steel with a BZP coating , available throughout the whole sub continent ... no matter how much your friend would like to believe he saw these fabricated in a back street workshop .. they are not one off's. [-X
    The quality of Bhang & Opium ( as with the quality of most Indian products) varies considerably across the country... Perhaps your colleague found the good quality ?
    In India its easy & often necessary to suspend belief .

    Nick
     
  15. -/-

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    So the shopkeeper might be a magician and have substiteted the "fabricated" parts with bought ones to impress further?