blog about jet boil

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by theyellowdog, Feb 14, 2011.

  1. theyellowdog

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    I have decided to get a gas stove, I am leaning towards the windpro, kovea moonwalker, brunton vesta or primus xpress spider. Anyway, while I was looking for info on these, I came across a blog with oodles of info about the jet boil and adapters. I did not read it as the jet boil stove does not seem like fun to me but I am sure some of you will enjoy reading it.

    http://pedaldamnit.blogspot.com/2010/02/jetboil-personal-cooking-system-remote.html

    As for my gas stove hunt I think the wind pro looks like the best option but I do think kovea products are fantastic quality. Will most likely go for the cheapest one.
     
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  2. RonPH

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    YD, whatever suits your budget and taste I'd say go for it. Since you have been reading up on the reviews, you know what you will be getting :thumbup: Dont forget to post pictures when you have received the stove.

    Ron
     
  3. linux_author

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    the little jetboil canisters are hard to find around here and are expensive - it's why i didn't contemplate this system even when i found it on sale for 30 percent off about a year ago... (i know you can use other canisters, but many times the 'all-in-one' setups where the stove stows inside the cookset are more convenient...

    and that vertical adapter for the long fuel canisters may work, but it like a *very* unstable stove setup and potentially dangerous!
     
  4. davidcolter

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    By half a through the article I was actually laughing out loud. Gas is supposed to be simple, this is it only advantage over other fuels! ](*,)
     
  5. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Well done for getting that far!
     
  6. BBM

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    I like my Optimus Crux, much easier than the 'plastic' JetBoil.
    And it all fits inside the pot with the gas can.
    If you need a windscreen, look at the Primus one wich fits around the gas can and also in the pot with everything else.
     
  7. hikin_jim

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    Snow Peak canisters are the same size and are typically much less expensive. Also I think Optimus and Brunton 4oz canisters are about the same size. Not trying to sell you on the JB, just mentioning options.

    MSR 4 oz canisters are very different in terms of their width.

    HJ
     
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  8. hikin_jim

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    Thanks for that; a very interesting blog post. He covered a lot of the basics of gas and adapters. I don't know if he realizes it or not, but some of those options at the very end for turning upright canister stoves into liquid feed gas stoves could be very dangerous.

    I'll be interested in hearing what you get. I see that SierraTradingPost has the Brunton Vesta for $54.95 USD which is far lower than the prices I typically see for the MSR WindPro which I consider to be in the same general class. I've got a 30% off coupon right now. With the 30% off coupon, the stove is $38.46 USD which is a really good price for a remote canister gas stove with a pre-heat loop (which makes it possible to use the canister in inverted mode in cold weather). PM me if you'd like me to pick one up for you. One complication: the coupon expires at 11:00 PM PST today (about six hours from now), and I'll have no idea as to the shipping cost until I go to the Post Office.

    I'm not familiar with the Vesta, so I don't know what it's reputation is in terms of quality, and I don't know how easy it is to invert the canister -- if indeed one can rotate the canister. I only know that it does have a pre-heat loop/generator.

    HJ
     
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  9. theyellowdog

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    Thanks for the offer HJ, I was on the STP site yesterday. I really wish the brunton bantam could burn gas as well as white fuel. I won't get one just yet as I have an add in the paper on thursday for a trangia gas burner. I do think the vesta is the best deal I have seen. Will let you know if I need any help.

    Thanks again
    Dan
     
  10. hikin_jim

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    It looks to me that the Bantam and the Vesta are the same stove in the same way that the Simmerlite and the WindPro are the Same stove. I must admit I'm curious about the Vesta.

    The do have the AF which will burn either Shellite type fuel or gas (or kero too), but it's a tad pricey: http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/,3391C_Brunton-Vapor-AF-All-Fuel-Expedition-Stove.html

    HJ
     
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  11. theyellowdog

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    and a tad noisy.
     
  12. johnsnz

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    Hi,

    If I was in the market for a gas stove currently I'd go for a SOTO OD-1R...



    OD-1R2-L.jpg

    The regulator makes this canister top interesting..


    Youtube video


    Cheers

    John
     
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  13. theyellowdog

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    That is a nice stove (but a clumsy oaf like me would spill too many dinners with a small stove). suddenly I am interested in gas stoves. I blame interesting posts by HJ and Presscall.
     
  14. hikin_jim

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    Well, I wonder about our friend the Soto regulator. It's certainly generated a lot of buzz, but is there any substance to the buzz? If I could pick one up cheaply, I'd love to play with it a bit. Unfortunately, they're a tad pricey right now.

    My speculation, and I'll own it as such, is that this regulator is more hype than help. When it's cold, the maximum amount of gas available is the maximum amount of gas available. In other words, opening the valve more won't cause additional vaporization in the tank. I think, the laws of physics being what they are, that the deciding factor at lower temperatures is the type of fuel used not the type of stove. If one uses a propane/isobutane blend at 25F, that will work reasonably well on a Soto or any other similar upright canister stove. If one uses 100% n-butane, it won't work well at 25F irrespective of the stove one uses.

    Perhaps the use of a regulator would help some if one were to just light a stove and let it burn until the canister were exhausted. I think it would work equally well if a person were standing by and once in a while opened the valve further manually.

    That test is interesting, but interesting only. What is the air temperature? Is this in a lab at the proverbial "room temperature" (75F)? If so, the canister temperature may not be all that cold. What is he doing that cools things that rapidly? Exactly what is being cooled? The stove? The gas feed alone? The canister? The entire assembly? I know of no mechanism that can change the temperature of the whole canister of gas that rapidly. I've very skeptical about the test shown. Just what is that thermometer measuring?

    I'd love to see some hard data on the Soto demonstrating that it has any advantage at any temperature below 0C over any other stove in the field under actual conditions.

    HJ
     
  15. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    I think a regulator could only be a bad thing. On a normal stove vaporisation takes place in the tank which has a large mass and surface area to handle the heat lost to vaporisation and pressure drop. On a regulator this pressure drop and the heat lost in the process happens in a small vessel with not much in the way of ability to reabsorb heat. It will freeze up if the conditions are right.
    Add to that the one of the things most canister stoves advertise as an advantage is simplicity. This one cant. The way I see it the less parts the less to fail. I would be happier with a $10 cheapy.
     
  16. johnsnz

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    What he is doing in the you tube video is altering the inlet pressure to that manifold with the Snow peak and SOTO stoves mounted on it...

    The guage is marked with temps in degrees F with stick on markings.

    What thay have done is to test what vapour pressure is generated in a canister of say 80/20 butane propane. The demo illustrates that at a vapour pressure you might expect a canister to produce at a low temp the stove with a needle valve will of course show the effects of low vapour pressure and the flame will be marginal.

    With a regulator and jetting of the appropriate size the stove can perform better on low vapour pressures.

    As in this case the appliance ( SOTO stove) has a fixed output it entirely possible to design a jet orifice and regulation mechanisim that works well for a given output on low vapour pressure.

    I'm not sure what mechanisim the SOTO uses to regulate the input pressure to the burner. It could be a restrictive orifice or it could be a diaphragm type regulator.

    The problem with Needle valve appliances in low temps is that the Liquid LPG in the canister just doesn't want to vapourise. You generally get some vapour pressure but often it's low and the performance is lack lustre...


    I think it's an interesting development. MSR have had a regulated appliance in the market for a while with the Reactor... That seems from what I read to work well.

    HTH


    John
     
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