British Army No2,3 and twelve stoves

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Surveyor, Jun 6, 2020.

  1. Surveyor

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    Has any one taken out the filler cap and put a pressure valve in to check for leaks, if so what size thread would be used?

    Thanks
     
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  3. Surveyor

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    Many thanks, keep forgetting to search there first
     
  4. Surveyor

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    The pressure gauge is on its way hopefully, can any one give a clue on the working and test pressures?
     
  5. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  6. Surveyor

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    Thanks for that, i have ordered a pressure gauge for the stove and am looking foe a pressure to read on the dial, the information is great especially the instructions for use, i have 4 No 12 so will be interested when i get them out to see what issues are on them
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  8. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    It doesn’t make sense to deal with leaks that way. If it’s a fuel leak you’ll soon know about it when attempting to pressurise the stove. Also obvious with an air leak, the stove depressurises and the intensity of the flame reduces quite rapidly.

    A pressure gauge will identify a leak you’d soon know about anyway but won’t tell you where the leak is, still requiring a ‘dunk test’.

    The only benefit of a pressure gauge I’ve found is on a Geniol military stove on which I habitually use the rapid pre-heater.

    It tells me when I’ve pressurised the tank enough to make the rapid pre-heater atomise fuel sufficiently to work properly and when to do some more pumping during the 90 seconds I pre-heat the burner to keep the rapid lighter working. Same with a Petromax lantern with a rapid pre-heater.

    A pressure gauge is handy on an Optimus 155 with pre-heaters too.

    Irony is, by a process of elimination I found an air leak on the Geniol was in the soldering of the bourden tube in the pressure gauge.

    The No.12 with its stainless steel welded fuel tank is about the least in need of a pressure gauge of any stove. Overpumping is impossible with it and the jet ultimately regulates the maximum flame possible, however highly pressured the air in the tank is.

    Still, a fun thing to watch the needle on I suppose.
     
  9. Surveyor

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    Thanks for this, i am just wanting a start point, my thinking is pressurize and leave for a while, waiting for liquid to come out and trace can be like catching smoke, and sometimes air comes out but not liquid