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Bulin gas guzzler

Discussion in 'China' started by presscall, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Li Ding posted his review of the Bulin HERE and at a point where the price of one was approaching 19GBP (postage from China included) I got one to play with. There, I've admitted it, TO PLAY WITH merely and with an inkling it wouldn't become a regular user stove - which proved to be a reasonably accurate inkling in point of fact.

    Straight out of the box, first thing I did was pop a canister on the valve and light it, obviously

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    Such haste meant that in these posed shots post-firing of stove (pot rest legs extended), stove (pot rest legs folded) the hot metal burner parts were no longer shiny

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    As usual, I couldn't resist taking a new acquisition to bits. Turns out, it was just as well - more of that later

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    The tri-burner set up utilises a clever anodised aluminium component to channel fuel to the jets and a couple of brass plugs that look superficially like jets (but without the holes obviously) blank off two superfluous tapped holes - a by-product of the machining process I suppose

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    I kid you not, I thought I'd discovered a pearl

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    I identified it as a blob of solder, confirmed by a quick zap on a fire brick with a blowlamp

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    It sat in this hollow and I don't see a purpose for it. It hadn't taken the contours of the hollow, so hadn't reached melting point when I fired the stove. I discarded it, and there's been no obvious consequence in terms of stove performance

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    This component screws onto the aluminium component's central spigot (where the 'pearl' was residing) and it's a heat exchanger - fins on the top end, heat conducted down the post to pre-heat the fuel charge, making an inverted canister liquefied gas feed workable for cold conditions. Nothing is said of the inverted cartridge capability in the instructions however and I established it by trial and error - no flaring once the stove had reached operating temperature with the gas cartridge 'upright'

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    Jet (3 of) orifices are as marked, 0.3mm (tested by 0.23mm pricker - a loose fit - and a 0.32mm pricker - not quite a fit)

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    Sintered metal filter you sometimes find on butane stoves - makes sense if poor quality fuel is used - not that I've ever come across any really poor quality butane that's clogged my stove jets not having the filter

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    Those triangular burner vanes clip on and serve a purpose to channel the flame front from the burner the ignition source lights to the other two burners in an instant. I've tried lighting the stove without the vanes attached and there's a delay of a second or two until the other two burners ignite

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    I'd say the total burner area of the three Bulin burners is comparable with that of an MSR SuperFly. However, the MSR jet has a 0.38mm jet orifice and the Bulin has 0.3mm X 3. Consequently, the Bulin has the potential to be a gas guzzler if the loud pedal is pressed. If backed off, it can be made to sip fuel - sort of.

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    This short stub of stainless cable is found in the stove-end end of the fuel hose. A baffle function I'm supposing, to even out fuel pressure spikes - not many from a butane gas source - possibly an indication that the stove could vapourise gasoline? I'm not too eager to go down that route

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    Here's what sapped my confidence - the crimped ferrule pulled off the stove-end end of the fuel hose without much prompting

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    Here's the stove connector hose barb. Not much of a barb for the hose to grip. The bend in the connector pipe is to provide clearance for the stove pot legs

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    The ferrule at the valve end of the fuel hose is longer and better crimped

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    This is something from another project, but of the same pattern and it's likely the hose barb will be a match and is properly formed as opposed to the one at the stove end of the Bulin

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    REPAIR AND FLAME SHOTS TO FOLLOW
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  2. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia Subscriber

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    G,,day . interesting little stove .
    you could have started making jewellery , and mounted your pearl in a ring or necklace :lol:
    cheers
    kerry
     
  3. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Very true Kerry!

    Conclusion.

    My replacement ferrule alongside the stock item.

    The stock ferrule is of chromed brass. Mine's made from brass tube with a drilled end piece silbrazed on (adds rigidity and stops the flexihose braided wire covering poking out and snagging fingers)

    Both are of about the same gauge metal, but the short length of the stock one and the poor crimping is what contributed to it losing its grip on the connector

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    Replacement in place on the hose, before crimping

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    Crimping process using a lathe four-jaw chuck

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    Job done

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    Flame shots from low to high. The middle setting and a simmer are the most usable in the range, unless searing meat and veg for a stir-fry is your thing

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    Cooling off

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    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  4. kerry460

    kerry460 Australia Subscriber

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    John , nice flame shot :thumbup:
    I reckon you bought it just for the flame pattern , sort of reminds me of another stove of yours :)
    kerry
     
  5. itchy United States

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    Excellent write up, again.
    Thanks John.
    The solder blob is curious. Could it be some sort of crude over-temp safety? Someone needs to get a second one of these and see if the blob is intentionally placed.
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Itchy.

    Solder blob as an overheating safety device? If so, I'm stumped how it might work. It's out of sight, masked by the heat exchanger rod when screwed in place, so couldn't offer a visual clue of overheat conditions to the user and obviously has no thermodynamic/mechanical function to reduce or stop the gas flow if it were to melt.

    You're right, it would be interesting to see if it's there in anyone else's. They'll need a thin 11mm wrench to engage with the flats on one of the heat exchanger fins to remove it to see.

    On giving it more thought, I'm pretty sure that the solder blob is residue from another process at the stove factory and got swept or fell into a parts bin containing heat exchanger post components for this stove, then got trapped in the hollow base of one of the components and wasn't spotted and removed by the assembly worker.

    John
     
  7. itchy United States

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    Ah yes, I should have looked at pics 5 and 6 more carefully. Ballast? :)